Problem mounting a tire

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Palisades, Aug 9, 2006.

  1. Palisades

    Palisades New Member

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    I am having a very hard time mounting a Vredestein tire onto my wheel, the first one went on easy, with no problems. I have changed tires before with no problems, but with this one it seems impossible to mount the final part of the tire to the wheel without using tire wrenches. The problem is I keep popping the tube with the wrenches. I was told never to use tools to mount a tire because of this, but what do you do when the tire is just too tight to get on with just your hands? I made sure it is the right size. Is there any trick to getting on especially difficult tires? Any help/advice would be appreciated, I can't tell you how frustrating it is to finally muscle it on and then hear the unmistakable hiss of air escaping. Thanks.
     
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  2. Scotty_Dog

    Scotty_Dog New Member

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  3. lks

    lks New Member

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    Some rim & tire combinations result in the tire, being used, being impossiible to mount without tire levers. I have friends that traded in their new Trek's Bontrager wheels, for Ksyriums, because they had to use force on their tire levers to mount their Michelins and were pinching tubes all the time. I can mount brand new Michelin Pro2 Race tires on my top of the line Ksyriums, using only my bare hands, without ever pinching my tubes, which only weigh 50 grams. I would think there are a lot of other rim and tire combinations that you can do the same. Dealers should know what those combinations are, at least for the wheel and tires they sell.
     
  4. carpediemracing

    carpediemracing New Member

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    the culprit when dealing with really hard mounting tires is usually the rim. tires are molded on a precise mold and rarely deviate too much. rims are extruded from a long piece of aluminum, cut, plugged. there is a lot of variance with rims (not necessarily true with carbon rims).

    the way to get tires on no matter how tight they are:
    1. semi inflate tube so it holds shape but doesn't stretch.
    2. put tube in tire (folding tires are a pain) at least enough that the beads cradle the tube
    3. put on the first bead. if you have to use a lever, do so
    4. put the tube "into" the rim. this means put the tube so it is totally inside the rim bead. only the second bead of the tire should be hanging outside the rim bead.
    *note - always start installing a tire at the valve (and when removing, always start opposite the valve)
    5. for semi-impossible to mount tires, get 2/3 of the tire mounted so that you are left with the last foot or so to mount. the, holding the wheel so the unmounted bit of bead is on the other side of the rim, start pulling the bead over with your 8 fingers. *don't* use your thumbs to try and push the bead up. your 8 fingers do better work
    6a. for virtually impossible tires, get to the last 6 or so inches (the bead will probably be 1" below the rim edge in the middle). use two levers. position one at one end of the unseated bead, slipping it under the bead. this one is to hold the tire in place so when you try and seat the other side it doesn't unseat this side.
    6b. position another lever about 1-2" away from the unseated bead on the other side. using your whole hand to move the lever, slowly and gently move the lever up (under the bead) so that it pushes the bead up onto the rim. it may not be necessary to even hook the lever on the rim (which is when you will kill your tube). if you have to hook it, slide the lever up the rim so that there is no tube under it, get to the rim bead, and slowly move the lever up.
    6c. do NOT let the lever snap vertical when the bead pops over as you will probably kill your tube. instead just as the bead slips over the rim, hold the lever so it's still mainly horizontal (90 deg to the rim) and move it down the tire 1/4" or so. repeat until you have about 3" of bead left. then slowly and carefully push up on the levers (remember, don't let the snap vertical) and let the bead pop over the rim

    **Critical** after you've used the levers, there is a very good chance the tube will be pinched under the bead. after you inflate your tire, the tube will slowly bulge out from under the bead and eventually blow up. signs of this are a huge rip in the tube with a virtually undamaged tire (damaged only from riding on it once it blows, or crashing if it happens at a bad time).

    ** to prevent the above from happening, deflate tube totally. then check, starting at the valve, each side of the tire. squeeze the tire to see if there is any bead sticking out from under the bead. there should be NO tube visible outside the bead. be very careful at the opposite end from the valve (since this is where you should have finished mounting the tire). if there is some tube sticking out, you can carefully push it under the bead while lifting the tire as much as possible off the rim. inflate to 20-30 psi (to help pull tube from under the bead), deflate, and check again. only after you've verified that there is NO tube sticking out from under the bead should you inflate fully.

    I've never had a tire blow out after making such checks. I've only needed the levers to install tires on maybe 50 or 60 wheels (out of thousands of wheels). the 8 finger method worked on virtually all the tires I've mounted. and finally I've never pinched tubes if my tire lever doesn't snap vertically.

    I'd say 1/5 of the tires difficult to mount result in some tube under the bead.

    you don't need a fancy tire lever to do this. the "one lever" stik will NOT work (end is too fat). I have a Ritchey "tool" which resembles a tire lever with some allen and screw heads growing out of one end. it has a metal center, a thin "lever" end, is very rigid, and is my favored tool for difficult tires.

    on a side note I don't remember ever breaking a tire lever installing a tire but I've broken dozens removing them.

    good luck with your tires
    cdr
     
  5. Palisades

    Palisades New Member

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    Thank you for your excellent post, I think you are absolutely right, when I use the levers they do snap vertically when the tire gets on and that is when i pop the tube. I will try your suggestions this weekend. Thanks again.

     
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