Problems removing crankset

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by John Appleby, Jul 1, 2003.

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  1. John Appleby

    John Appleby Guest

    Hi,

    I am having problems getting my crankset off. The bolts (allen type) seem pretty much welded to the
    BB and my attempts have purely managed to round them off.

    Is there anything I can do to get it off now except for to take a drill to the bolts?

    I'm planning on replacing the crankset anyhow, so I'm not hugely bothered if I ruin the existing
    crankset and BB in doing so.

    TIA,

    John
     
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  2. John Rees

    John Rees Guest

    "John Appleby" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am having problems getting my crankset off. The bolts (allen type) seem pretty much welded to
    > the BB and my attempts have purely managed to round them off.
    >
    > Is there anything I can do to get it off now except for to take a drill to the bolts?
    >
    > I'm planning on replacing the crankset anyhow, so I'm not hugely bothered
    if
    > I ruin the existing crankset and BB in doing so.

    Drill out the crank bolts. Maybe What kind of cranks? Are they self extracting bolts? If they are,
    they are likely part of the problem. If you drill them out, you're going to have to figure out a way
    to replace them. I personally do not like self extracting crank bolts for this reason. John Rees
     
  3. John Appleby

    John Appleby Guest

    > > I am having problems getting my crankset off. The bolts (allen type)
    seem
    > > pretty much welded to the BB and my attempts have purely managed to
    round
    > > them off.
    > >
    > > Is there anything I can do to get it off now except for to take a drill
    to
    > > the bolts?
    > >
    > > I'm planning on replacing the crankset anyhow, so I'm not hugely
    bothered
    > if
    > > I ruin the existing crankset and BB in doing so.
    >
    > Drill out the crank bolts. Maybe What kind of cranks? Are they self extracting bolts? If they are,
    > they are likely part of the problem. If
    you
    > drill them out, you're going to have to figure out a way to replace them.
    I
    > personally do not like self extracting crank bolts for this reason.

    I'm sorry, I should have been more specific.

    It's a Trek 9900 OCLV frame with a UN-72 high-profile BB and 1992 Deore LX chainset. All the rings
    have gone and need replacing which is why I need to get it off and it also creaks like hell.

    The bolts are regular steel bolts; I managed to get the non-chainset crank bolt out and then screwed
    an extractor all the way in. On tightening the inner part of the crank extractor to try to extract
    the crank, it tore itself out and dethreaded the crank.

    I'm planning on replacing the crankset and BB so I'm not too bothered if I ruin anything in the
    process. Other than the frame!

    Regards,

    John
     
  4. John Rees

    John Rees Guest

    "John Appleby" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > > I am having problems getting my crankset off. The bolts (allen type)
    > seem
    > > > pretty much welded to the BB and my attempts have purely managed to
    > round
    > > > them off.
    > > >
    > > > Is there anything I can do to get it off now except for to take a
    drill
    > to
    > > > the bolts?
    > > >
    > > > I'm planning on replacing the crankset anyhow, so I'm not hugely
    > bothered
    > > if
    > > > I ruin the existing crankset and BB in doing so.
    > >
    > > Drill out the crank bolts. Maybe What kind of cranks? Are they self extracting bolts? If they
    > > are, they are likely part of the problem. If
    > you
    > > drill them out, you're going to have to figure out a way to replace
    them.
    > I
    > > personally do not like self extracting crank bolts for this reason.
    >
    > I'm sorry, I should have been more specific.
    >
    > It's a Trek 9900 OCLV frame with a UN-72 high-profile BB and 1992 Deore LX chainset. All the rings
    > have gone and need replacing which is why I need
    to
    > get it off and it also creaks like hell.
    >
    > The bolts are regular steel bolts; I managed to get the non-chainset crank bolt out and then
    > screwed an extractor all the way in. On tightening the inner part of the crank extractor to try to
    > extract the crank, it tore itself out and dethreaded the crank.
    >
    > I'm planning on replacing the crankset and BB so I'm not too bothered if I ruin anything in the
    > process. Other than the frame!

    Wow. I guess it's time to take a hack saw and cut the crank off at the spindle on the non drive
    side. The thread off the bb (if that is willing to give in) and pull the wretched thing off the
    other side, bb still attached to the crank. Oh wait, you can't get a bbt tool on the drive side yet.
    Man, that sucks. Is un72 square taper or octalink? You could cut the cranks off by cutting where the
    square is. then throw the whole lot into a river! John Rees
     
  5. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    > > I'm sorry, I should have been more specific.
    > >
    > > It's a Trek 9900 OCLV frame with a UN-72 high-profile BB and 1992 Deore
    LX
    > > chainset. All the rings have gone and need replacing which is why I need
    > to
    > > get it off and it also creaks like hell.
    > >
    > > The bolts are regular steel bolts; I managed to get the non-chainset
    crank
    > > bolt out and then screwed an extractor all the way in. On tightening the inner part of the crank
    > > extractor to try to extract the crank, it tore itself out and dethreaded the crank.
    > >
    > > I'm planning on replacing the crankset and BB so I'm not too bothered if
    I
    > > ruin anything in the process. Other than the frame!
    >
    > Wow. I guess it's time to take a hack saw and cut the crank off at the spindle on the non drive
    > side. The thread off the bb (if that is willing
    to
    > give in) and pull the wretched thing off the other side, bb still attached to the crank. Oh wait,
    > you can't get a bbt tool on the drive side yet. Man, that sucks. Is un72 square taper or octalink?
    > You could cut the cranks off by cutting where the square is. then throw the whole lot into a
    > river! John Rees
    >
    >
    You can probably rent/borrow a gear puller from your local NAPA Auto Parts store that'll get that
    pesky crank off without resorting to hacksaws or blowtorches. Since the crank is just a press fit,
    it shouldn't take too much to get it off...

    Mike
     
  6. Appkiller

    Appkiller Guest

    "John Appleby" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am having problems getting my crankset off. The bolts (allen type) seem pretty much welded to
    > the BB and my attempts have purely managed to round them off.
    >
    > Is there anything I can do to get it off now except for to take a drill to the bolts?
    >
    > I'm planning on replacing the crankset anyhow, so I'm not hugely bothered if I ruin the existing
    > crankset and BB in doing so.
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > John

    Reciprocating saw. Metal blade.

    Good luck.

    App
     
  7. John Appleby

    John Appleby Guest

    > Wow. I guess it's time to take a hack saw and cut the crank off at the spindle on the non drive
    > side. The thread off the bb (if that is willing
    to
    > give in) and pull the wretched thing off the other side, bb still attached to the crank. Oh wait,
    > you can't get a bbt tool on the drive side yet. Man, that sucks. Is un72 square taper or
    > octalink? You could cut the cranks off by cutting where the square is. then throw the whole lot
    > into a river!

    1992 LX crankset? Octalink? What's that? :)

    To be fair it has served me well through several bike frames, but I think this time it has finally
    given up the ghost. Mostly because good quality non-compact rings are getting harder to find, as is
    a front mech that will fit. Since my front mech has given up the ghost as have all the chainrings, I
    thought I might as well replace the lot.

    Isn't the BB pretty hard to hacksaw through? I'm wondering about the bucket of boiling water and a
    hammer approach.

    I don't even want to THINK how hard it's gonna be to remove the BB. I didn't install it; it came
    with the frameset, which I bought in August 1997. Here's praying that they greased it well. At
    least the Shimano BB tool is a pretty solid contraption, though I think mine was bought some 12
    years ago or more:)

    John
     
  8. Before you give your BB spindle a lobotomy, Try some WD-40. Saturate the bolts and let them soak,
    allowing the etch to work on the corrosion that had "welded' your bolts in place.

    Someone in this group had a similar problem wioth his seat post. It took a little patience (and a
    lot of WD-40), but he managed to salvage both post and frame.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  9. The cranks are a lot easier to cut than the axle (aluminium vs. steel). Use a Dremel tool with a
    cutting wheel to make a cut opposite the arm of the crank and in line with a corner of the axle.
    Make sure to hold the tool so it tends to kick away from the frame when it jams in the slot. No need
    to cut all the way through - once you have a deep enough cut, you should be able to put force on the
    pedals and stretch the hole in the crank.
     
  10. Tue, 1 Jul 2003 11:06:18 -0700, Mike S.:

    >You can probably rent/borrow a gear puller from your local NAPA Auto Parts store that'll get that
    >pesky crank off without resorting to hacksaws or blowtorches. Since the crank is just a press fit,
    >it shouldn't take too much to get it off...

    2- or 3-arm puller will most likely not work on their own. But - combined with heating the crank
    with an "electric hot air gun" (like used to remove paint or shrink shrink sleeves) or a gas burner
    it is easy to pull of the crank, because aluminium expands much more while heated than steel.

    Andreas
     
  11. John Appleby

    John Appleby Guest

    > 2- or 3-arm puller will most likely not work on their own. But - combined with heating the
    > crank with an "electric hot air gun" (like used to remove paint or shrink shrink sleeves) or a
    > gas burner it is easy to pull of the crank, because aluminium expands much more while heated
    > than steel.

    Yeah I thought of using a heat gun - is that safe to do around a carbon frame though?

    Regards,

    John
     
  12. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    -Several attributions were lost in earlier edits-
    > > > I'm sorry, I should have been more specific. It's a Trek 9900 OCLV frame with a UN-72
    > > > high-profile BB and 1992
    Deore
    > LX
    > > > chainset. All the rings have gone and need replacing which is why I
    need
    > > to
    > > > get it off and it also creaks like hell.
    > > >
    > > > The bolts are regular steel bolts; I managed to get the non-chainset
    > crank
    > > > bolt out and then screwed an extractor all the way in. On tightening
    the
    > > > inner part of the crank extractor to try to extract the crank, it tore itself out and
    > > > dethreaded the crank.

    > > > I'm planning on replacing the crankset and BB so I'm not too bothered
    if
    > > > I ruin anything in the process. Other than the frame!
    > >
    > > Wow. I guess it's time to take a hack saw and cut the crank off at the spindle on the non drive
    > > side. The thread off the bb (if that is
    willing
    > to
    > > give in) and pull the wretched thing off the other side, bb still
    attached
    > > to the crank. Oh wait, you can't get a bbt tool on the drive side yet. Man, that sucks. Is un72
    > > square taper or octalink? You could cut the cranks off by
    cutting
    > > where the square is. then throw the whole lot into a river!

    "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > You can probably rent/borrow a gear puller from your local NAPA Auto Parts store that'll get that
    > pesky crank off without resorting to hacksaws or blowtorches. Since the crank is just a press fit,
    > it shouldn't take too much to get it off...

    Have you actually tried that? A gear puller or a steering wheel puller is a poor fit across a
    5-arm crank
    . The experience is unforgettable.

    A VAR 932 slips over the arm (not across the spider) and is very quick and effective for better
    quality arms. Modern inexpensive arms are so soft that the VAR tool will bend them without removal.

    If the crank will not be reused, heat the crank. Once the crank is hot, a smart tap from the inside
    will knock it right into the waiting bucket of water .Oxy-Acetylene directed right on the meatiest
    part of the crank is best. The crank expands fairly quickly so you can do that without extraneous
    heat effects . With a small propane tank, the flame temperature is lower so you end up with a lot
    more total heat. That risks burning the grease in the BB and possibly paint damage.
    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  13. Wed, 2 Jul 2003 11:29:48 +0100, John Appleby:

    >
    >Yeah I thought of using a heat gun - is that safe to do around a carbon frame though?

    Build a "heat shield" made from cardboard. Try to heat up the crank very quick (highest power
    setting of the hot air gun). I don't expect any problem for the frame (up to 70°C should not damage
    the resin, the carbon fibers can stand much more).

    Andreas
     
  14. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "John Appleby" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I don't even want to THINK how hard it's gonna be to remove the BB. I didn't install it; it came
    > with the frameset, which I bought in August 1997. Here's praying that they greased it well. At
    > least the Shimano BB tool is a pretty solid contraption, though I think mine was bought some 12
    > years ago or more:)

    The problem I've had with BB removal is the tool teeth and matching slots in the BB are very
    shallow and the tool tends to cam out with any significant torque. If the Shimano tool doesn't have
    a bolt (the Park I have doesn't) you can buy a bolt & some washers. I had to do this & use a *big*
    wrench to get a BB off recently. Unfortunately, to do this, you have to get the existing bolts out
    of the BB...
     
  15. Derk

    Derk Guest

    Peter Cole wrote:
    > The problem I've had with BB removal is the tool teeth and matching slots in the BB are very
    > shallow and the tool tends to cam out with any significant torque.
    Not if you use the TACX tool....: "the keys come with an axle and pressure spring that can be
    screwed into the cartridge to prevent keys from slipping and damaging the bicycle".
    http://www.tacx.nl/frameset.cfm?l=en&id=100

    grets, Derk
     
  16. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Derk" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Peter Cole wrote:
    > > The problem I've had with BB removal is the tool teeth and matching slots in the BB are very
    > > shallow and the tool tends to cam out with any significant torque.
    > Not if you use the TACX tool....: "the keys come with an axle and pressure spring that can be
    > screwed into the cartridge to prevent keys from slipping and damaging the bicycle".
    > http://www.tacx.nl/frameset.cfm?l=en&id=100

    Yeah, but at 25 euro a pop, I think the Park tool combined with an M8 bolt is a better deal. I
    haven't seen the TACX, but I wonder why a spring is necessary.
     
  17. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    si l'usine ou livres de wud se réunissent les sans secs de crank/spindles jamais-nous saisissent que
    le wudn't ont ces problèmes.
     
  18. Ant

    Ant Guest

    "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > The problem I've had with BB removal is the tool teeth and matching slots in the BB are very
    > shallow and the tool tends to cam out with any significant torque. If the Shimano tool doesn't
    > have a bolt (the Park I have doesn't) you can buy a bolt & some washers. I had to do this & use a
    > *big* wrench to get a BB off recently. Unfortunately, to do this, you have to get the existing
    > bolts out of the BB...

    i have a bb spline tool, and like anyone else i suppose, have trouble using it on shallow splines,
    or with stuck bbs. instead of going to the hardware store, i cut a 2.5" x 2.5" square of 1/4"
    plywood, and drilled a hole in the center. using a crank bolt, you can just thread it into the
    crank, and the wood holds the tool from popping out of the splines. finger tight works a charm, and
    you can tighten it or loosen it as you work the tool.

    i also have a 1/2" wood piece. between these two wooden 'washers', i have had no trouble, and
    havent broken teeth off a welded-in cheapo left-out-in-the-rain-for-two-years plastic adjustable
    cup in two years. ;)

    (nothing new here, just saves a trip to the store, and a lot of places dont carry m8 bolts anyway)

    anthony
     
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