Produce, Decoded

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Nancy Young, Mar 14, 2004.

  1. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    This is straight out of Reader's Digest:

    Those little stickers on fruits and vegetables at the
    supermarket aren't just for the checkout clerk to find the
    price. You can use the numbers to figure out how the produce
    you're buying has been grown.

    A sticker with four digits means the food was conventionally
    grown. Five digits starting with an 8 indicate genetically
    engineered produce (the food's genetic material has been
    altered), and five digits starting with a 9 means the food
    was organically grown (without the use of most conventional
    pesticides or synthetic fertilizers).

    Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker adhesive -
    it's required to be safe to eat.

    (writer: Neena Samuel)
     
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  2. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 15:16:39 -0500, Nancy Young
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker adhesive -
    >it's required to be safe to eat.

    I've eaten the not just the adhesive, but the stickers as
    well. Chopped them right up while stuck to the vegetable.

    Everyone could use a little more fiber in their diet.

    Thanks for the info, BTW. I never knew that.

    -sw
     
  3. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    Nancy Young <[email protected]> deliciously posted in
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    > This is straight out of Reader's Digest:
    >
    > Those little stickers on fruits and vegetables at the
    > supermarket aren't just for the checkout clerk to find the
    > price. You can use the numbers to figure out how the
    > produce you're buying has been grown.
    >
    > A sticker with four digits means the food was
    > conventionally grown. Five digits starting with an 8
    > indicate genetically engineered produce (the food's
    > genetic material has been altered), and five digits
    > starting with a 9 means the food was organically grown
    > (without the use of most conventional pesticides or
    > synthetic fertilizers).
    >
    > Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker adhesive -
    > it's required to be safe to eat.
    >
    > (writer: Neena Samuel)

    Interesting info and thanks for posting it. I had no idea. I
    get so irritated with those stickers.

    Michael
    --
    Deathbed statement...

    "Codeine . . . bourbon." ~~Tallulah Bankhead, actress, d.
    December 12, 1968
     
  4. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker adhesive -
    > it's required to be safe to eat.
    >
    >
    Unless you're a vegan and don't like ingesting any products
    derived from an animal source.

    (Not that I am - just making an observation.)
    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist
    hopes they are.
     
  5. John Gaughan

    John Gaughan Guest

    Steve Wertz wrote:
    > I've eaten the not just the adhesive, but the stickers as
    > well. Chopped them right up while stuck to the vegetable.
    >
    > Everyone could use a little more fiber in their diet.

    A few times I have missed those stickers until it is too
    late. I now know what sauted sticker tastes like: tasteless.
    Anyway, I doubt even the sticker is harmful. I am still
    alive, and I swear I am not crazy.

    --
    John Gaughan http://www.johngaughan.net/
    [email protected]
     
  6. Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker adhesive -
    >it's required to be safe to eat.

    It was the tastiest part of one Chilean nectarine I had a
    couple of weeks ago.

    --Blair "The rest was a
    crime against nature."
     
  7. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    Donna Rose wrote:
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>,

    > > Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker adhesive
    > > - it's required to be safe to eat.
    > >
    > >
    > Unless you're a vegan and don't like ingesting any
    > products derived from an animal source.

    In that event they wouldn't buy anything with a sticker
    on it, no?

    nancy
     
  8. John Gaughan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Steve Wertz wrote:
    >> I've eaten the not just the adhesive, but the stickers as
    >> well. Chopped them right up while stuck to the vegetable.
    >>
    >> Everyone could use a little more fiber in their diet.
    >
    >A few times I have missed those stickers until it is too
    >late. I now know what sauted sticker tastes like:
    >tasteless. Anyway, I doubt even the sticker is harmful. I
    >am still alive, and I swear I am not crazy.

    I grated the label into my asiago once.

    --Blair "Didn't notice until
    cleanup time."
     
  9. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Donna Rose wrote:
    > >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    >
    > > > Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker
    > > > adhesive - it's required to be safe to eat.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > Unless you're a vegan and don't like ingesting any
    > > products derived from an animal source.
    >
    > In that event they wouldn't buy anything with a sticker
    > on it, no?

    My guess is that would be their choice - however, have you
    tried finding produce without those stickers lately? I
    usually root through the bins looking for the occasional one
    that doesn't have a label on it, since I find them so
    difficult to remove on some things. And I buy most of my
    produce from the markets in Chinatown, instead of from the
    local stupidmarket. I suppose the farmers' markets would be
    a good source, though.
    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist
    hopes they are.
     
  10. Alzelt

    Alzelt Guest

    Nancy Young wrote:

    > This is straight out of Reader's Digest:
    >
    > Those little stickers on fruits and vegetables at the
    > supermarket aren't just for the checkout clerk to find the
    > price. You can use the numbers to figure out how the
    > produce you're buying has been grown.
    >
    > A sticker with four digits means the food was
    > conventionally grown. Five digits starting with an 8
    > indicate genetically engineered produce (the food's
    > genetic material has been altered), and five digits
    > starting with a 9 means the food was organically grown
    > (without the use of most conventional pesticides or
    > synthetic fertilizers).
    >
    > Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker adhesive -
    > it's required to be safe to eat.
    >
    > (writer: Neena Samuel)

    Will you please forward me a decoder ring to wear when I
    visit the supermarket.

    --
    Alan

    "If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the relig-
    ion, and avoid the people, you might better stay home."
    -- James Michener
     
  11. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    alzelt wrote:
    >
    > Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    > > This is straight out of Reader's Digest:
    > >
    > > Those little stickers on fruits and vegetables at the
    > > supermarket aren't just for the checkout clerk to find
    > > the price. You can use the numbers to figure out how the
    > > produce you're buying has been grown.
    > >
    > > A sticker with four digits means the food was
    > > conventionally grown. Five digits starting with an 8
    > > indicate genetically engineered produce (the food's
    > > genetic material has been altered), and five digits
    > > starting with a 9 means the food was organically grown
    > > (without the use of most conventional pesticides or
    > > synthetic fertilizers).
    > >
    > > Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker adhesive
    > > - it's required to be safe to eat.
    > >
    > > (writer: Neena Samuel)
    >
    > Will you please forward me a decoder ring to wear when I
    > visit the supermarket.

    Sure, send 5 proofs of purchase and $3.95 s&h.

    nancy
     
  12. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 15:16:39 -0500, Nancy Young
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >This is straight out of Reader's Digest:
    >
    >Those little stickers on fruits and vegetables at the
    >supermarket aren't just for the checkout clerk to find the
    >price. You can use the numbers to figure out how the
    >produce you're buying has been grown.
    >
    >A sticker with four digits means the food was
    >conventionally grown. Five digits starting with an 8
    >indicate genetically engineered produce (the food's genetic
    >material has been altered), and five digits starting with a
    >9 means the food was organically grown (without the use of
    >most conventional pesticides or synthetic fertilizers).

    I've been thinking about this and aren't most of the
    "traditionally grown" veggies also genetically modified?
    Take a Texas 1015 (4 digits), and obviously the product of a
    laboratory (1015 stands for something significant - like
    10:15 in the morning when it was finally created).

    In a way, all the veggies we've grown all over the decades
    have been genetically modified, whether in a lab, or VIA
    selective breeding and crossbreeding.

    -sw
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>,
    alzelt <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    > > This is straight out of Reader's Digest:
    > >
    > > Those little stickers on fruits and vegetables at the
    > > supermarket aren't just for the checkout clerk to find
    > > the price. You can use the numbers to figure out how the
    > > produce you're buying has been grown.
    > >
    > > A sticker with four digits means the food was
    > > conventionally grown. Five digits starting with an 8
    > > indicate genetically engineered produce (the food's
    > > genetic material has been altered), and five digits
    > > starting with a 9 means the food was organically grown
    > > (without the use of most conventional pesticides or
    > > synthetic fertilizers).
    > >
    > > Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker adhesive
    > > - it's required to be safe to eat.
    > >
    > > (writer: Neena Samuel)
    >
    > Will you please forward me a decoder ring to wear when I
    > visit the supermarket.

    ROTFLMAO!!! Excellent, Alan.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 3-13-04.
    Rec.food.cooking's Preserved Fruit Administrator (I've got
    the button to prove it!) "The only difference between a rut
    and a grave is the depth of the hole."
     
  14. Alzelt

    Alzelt Guest

    Nancy Young wrote:

    > alzelt wrote:
    >
    >>Nancy Young wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>This is straight out of Reader's Digest:
    >>>
    >>>Those little stickers on fruits and vegetables at the
    >>>supermarket aren't just for the checkout clerk to find
    >>>the price. You can use the numbers to figure out how the
    >>>produce you're buying has been grown.
    >>>
    >>>A sticker with four digits means the food was
    >>>conventionally grown. Five digits starting with an 8
    >>>indicate genetically engineered produce (the food's
    >>>genetic material has been altered), and five digits
    >>>starting with a 9 means the food was organically grown
    >>>(without the use of most conventional pesticides or
    >>>synthetic fertilizers).
    >>>
    >>>Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker adhesive
    >>>- it's required to be safe to eat.
    >>>
    >>>(writer: Neena Samuel)
    >>
    >>Will you please forward me a decoder ring to wear when I
    >>visit the supermarket.
    >
    >
    > Sure, send 5 proofs of purchase and $3.95 s&h.
    >
    > nancy
    I have five TPR labels but no proof of purchase. :)
    --
    Alan

    "If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the relig-
    ion, and avoid the people, you might better stay home."
    -- James Michener
     
  15. B . Server

    B . Server Guest

    On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 22:36:10 GMT, Donna Rose
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    >[email protected] says...
    >> Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker adhesive
    >> - it's required to be safe to eat.
    >>
    >>
    >Unless you're a vegan and don't like ingesting any products
    >derived from an animal source.
    >
    >(Not that I am - just making an observation.)

    I'll bite. What is it that you presume the adhesive
    contains?
     
  16. B.Server <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 22:36:10 GMT, Donna Rose
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>[email protected] says...
    >>> Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker adhesive
    >>> - it's required to be safe to eat.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>Unless you're a vegan and don't like ingesting any
    >>products derived from an animal source.
    >>
    >>(Not that I am - just making an observation.)
    >
    >I'll bite. What is it that you presume the adhesive
    >contains?

    Antioxidants.

    Caloric.

    Myrrh.

    --Blair "Pass the
    phlogiston, will you?"
     
  17. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 22:36:10 GMT, Donna Rose
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > >[email protected] says...
    > >> Don't worry if you can't remove all the sticker
    > >> adhesive - it's required to be safe to eat.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >Unless you're a vegan and don't like ingesting any
    > >products derived from an animal source.
    > >
    > >(Not that I am - just making an observation.)
    >
    > I'll bite. What is it that you presume the adhesive
    > contains?
    >
    Isn't glue made from horse's hooves or something?
    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist
    hopes they are.
     
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