Proform TDF Pedal Problem

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by jwroubaix, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. jwroubaix

    jwroubaix New Member

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    I just got a Proform TDF and I'm trying to install my Look Keo pedals. I can't not get them to go on like they are supposed. The threads aren't going in all the way and they arent even. The top threads are in and bottom are sticking. I installed the wrong pedal on one side, Did I ruin it? Can you purchase replacement cranks.
     
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  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. Well, this may be after-the-fact, but the LEFT (non-driveside) pedal has a LEFT HAND THREAD and the RIGHT (driveside) pedal has a RIGHT HAND THREAD.

    Typically, you should be able to insert & remove a pedal using only an ALLEN WRENCH ... often a 6mm, sometimes a 5.5mm (most later LOOK pedals, AFAIK).

    A "Pedal Wrench" can expedite the initial loosening & final tightening the pedal spindle in the crankarm, but (IMO) you can make the pedal tight enough with just an Allen Wrench.

    It is possible that you CROSS THREADED the crankarms ...

    If that is the case, then HERE's your remedy (AT LEAST, HOPEFULLY THIS WILL WORK):

    • remove the pedals
    • inspect the receiving threads on the cranks
    • grease the threads with ANY light grease
    • insert the appropriate pedal from the BB side of the crankarm & thread it in using the appropriate Allen wrench ... you are essentially CHASING THE THREADS which you may have cross threaded ...
    • remove the pedal
    • insert from the correct side of the crank arm
    • tighten with the Allen Wrench
    • REPEAT on the other crankarm

    IF you cannot chase the threads then it is possible that you trashed your crankset ... there are ways to resolve this, but most shops won't AND (regardless) it may be less expensive & less trouble to bite-the-bullet and plan on buying a replacement crankset + BB. An English BB (68mm BB shell, 1.37x24 threading) is still standard on most bikes.

    Good luck!
     
  3. jwroubaix

    jwroubaix New Member

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    I got one side to work, but I think he other side is stripped. I have it in there right now but it's not straight. I'll have to replace it.
     
  4. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    You may want to see if the threads on the buggered crank arm can be chased and brought back into serviceable form. Next time be sure to lube the pedal axle threads and finger tighten the things before getting out the wrenches. You should be able to thread them on pretty easily with only your digits.
     
  5. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    It is possible to re-thread the crank. If you don't have tap and die tools find a good mechanic or machine shop. A helicoil can also be inserted if the threads are too far gone to be re-threaded.
     
  6. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. Unless a friend is a machinist (who will do the work for a beer-or-soda & pizza while you chat with him about this-or-that), it is probably impractical to pay one to re-tap the threads ...

    Helicoils ARE an option, but they are hard to find for a crankarm's pedal threads (at least, that was my experience).
     
  7. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    I could get it done for 5 dollars or maybe free, regional thing I guess. It would take 5 minutes. Any half blind , half competent mechanic can retap threads. It's a simple thing.
     
  8. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    It's dead simple for a machinist to chase those threads. Just insert from the backside. No tricks needed.
     
  9. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    I guess the machinists where I live charge more ...

    Regardless, in my initial reply in this thread, I indicated to the OP how he could chase the threads for FREE ...
     
  10. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Yes. Thank you for echoing the technique which I indicated in my initial posting in this thread.
     
  11. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    ....and thus it's just as easy to cut threads from the back. Again, no machinist required.
     
  12. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

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    Heli coils work best when installed in blind holes. Heli coils require drilling and tapping with non standard size taps. Left handed heli coils are very rare. Crank arms are not flat so the threaded hole is counter-bored so it has a perpendicular surface to the thread to allow the pedal to mount square. Drilling to install the Heli coil will remove the counter-bored hole. IMO a heli coil should be the last option.
     
  13. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

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    I would try this method it requires nothing other than your pedal and the wrench you used to install it to make the repair.
     
  14. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

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    Good advice. I am sure very many have learned this lesson the hard way.
     
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