profuse sweating

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Steve Shattuck, Aug 2, 2004.

  1. On a 85+ degree day with 90% + humidity, I easily sweat out 4 pounds of
    water per hour. I drink as much as I can, using Accelerade or Powerade but
    after about 3 hours, assuming I'm in the middle of a half ironman, I feel
    drained. Is this possibly because I cannot replenish as much as I'm losing.
    In addition to the above, I take Lava salt capsules and Enervit GT tablets.
    Going through all of the above, at least I've solved my muscle cramping
    issue but the energy issue is still out there.
    Help me if you can.
    Steve
     
    Tags:


  2. gentolm

    gentolm Guest

    power bar??/

    Steve Shattuck wrote:
    >
    > On a 85+ degree day with 90% + humidity, I easily sweat out 4 pounds of
    > water per hour. I drink as much as I can, using Accelerade or Powerade but
    > after about 3 hours, assuming I'm in the middle of a half ironman, I feel
    > drained. Is this possibly because I cannot replenish as much as I'm losing.
    > In addition to the above, I take Lava salt capsules and Enervit GT tablets.
    > Going through all of the above, at least I've solved my muscle cramping
    > issue but the energy issue is still out there.
    > Help me if you can.
    > Steve
     
  3. John B.

    John B. Guest

    I don't have an answer for you, but I'm curious about how you've
    solved your muscle cramps. Is it the Powerade or the salt or the
    Enervit or is it all of them combined? I get terrible cramps in my
    legs after about 15 miles and I've never been able to figure out how
    to avoid them. Thanks.



    "Steve Shattuck" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On a 85+ degree day with 90% + humidity, I easily sweat out 4 pounds of
    > water per hour. I drink as much as I can, using Accelerade or Powerade but
    > after about 3 hours, assuming I'm in the middle of a half ironman, I feel
    > drained. Is this possibly because I cannot replenish as much as I'm losing.
    > In addition to the above, I take Lava salt capsules and Enervit GT tablets.
    > Going through all of the above, at least I've solved my muscle cramping
    > issue but the energy issue is still out there.
    > Help me if you can.
    > Steve
     
  4. amh

    amh Guest

    "Steve Shattuck" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On a 85+ degree day with 90% + humidity, I easily sweat out 4 pounds of
    > water per hour. I drink as much as I can, using Accelerade or Powerade but
    > after about 3 hours, assuming I'm in the middle of a half ironman, I feel
    > drained. Is this possibly because I cannot replenish as much as I'm losing.
    > In addition to the above, I take Lava salt capsules and Enervit GT tablets.
    > Going through all of the above, at least I've solved my muscle cramping
    > issue but the energy issue is still out there.
    > Help me if you can.
    > Steve


    Having done 1 half iron man in the conditions you describe I can
    attest to the draining power of a long endurance event.

    I can't stomach energy drinks when I'm racing but I can chew down
    powerbars which do me good. I'm not familiar with the tablets you
    refer to. My recomendation would be to find a different source of
    energy. A trainer who works with first time ironman aspirants
    recomends Endurox or something like it.

    I've only done 3 events that ran into the 5-6 hour range and each time
    I got my energy from a solid bar rather than liquid. One event I
    downed a snickers bar which helped alot.

    Andy
     
  5. Philip Uglow

    Philip Uglow Guest

    I use a product called "Cell Food", which is a water additive that
    allows for better absorption of water by your body. For energy I use
    pumpkin seed oil capsules, ( 1 per mile). I also add "Endurlyte" from
    Genestra to my water. Endurlyte is a vitamin sodium replacement.
    Like Gatorade without the junk.
    Works for me, but everyone is different.
    Phil.

    On Tue, 03 Aug 2004 01:35:08 GMT, "Steve Shattuck"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On a 85+ degree day with 90% + humidity, I easily sweat out 4 pounds of
    >water per hour. I drink as much as I can, using Accelerade or Powerade but
    >after about 3 hours, assuming I'm in the middle of a half ironman, I feel
    >drained. Is this possibly because I cannot replenish as much as I'm losing.
    >In addition to the above, I take Lava salt capsules and Enervit GT tablets.
    >Going through all of the above, at least I've solved my muscle cramping
    >issue but the energy issue is still out there.
    >Help me if you can.
    >Steve
    >
     
  6. >I use a product called "Cell Food", which is a water additive that
    >allows for better absorption of water by your body. For energy I use
    >pumpkin seed oil capsules, ( 1 per mile). I also add "Endurlyte" from
    >Genestra to my water. Endurlyte is a vitamin sodium replacement.
    >Like Gatorade without the junk.
    >Works for me, but everyone is different.
    >Phil.


    Ignore him. 8 or 10 glasses of water, 3 tall gatorades (from the powdered mix,
    not the liquid stuff) and you'll need nothing else, well, except for training.
     
  7. dieshooter

    dieshooter Guest

    >
    > I've only done 3 events that ran into the 5-6 hour range and each time
    > I got my energy from a solid bar rather than liquid. One event I
    > downed a snickers bar which helped alot.
    >
    > Andy


    A good source of lasting energy can come from meal replacement drinks
    such as Boost, Boost Plus, or Ensure .. there are many varieties out
    there, flavors, brands, etc ... if you can find one you like, it can
    be a great source of easily digestible calories that last longer than
    a sugar spike ...
     
  8. On 03 Aug 2004 17:23:48 GMT, [email protected] (TheBillRodgerz)
    wrote:

    >Ignore him. 8 or 10 glasses of water, 3 tall gatorades (from the powdered mix,
    >not the liquid stuff) and you'll need nothing else, well, except for training.


    Not necessarily true

    Yesterday I ran 5.5 miles in a leisurely 40 minutes. It was 83
    degrees with about 70% humidity and when I finished I was 4 lbs
    lighter and soaked to the skin to the point of my running shoes
    squishing. Typical for me this time of year. So I have first hand
    experience with your problem and can tell you that there is no good
    solution.

    When I was running marathons a few years ago I found that if I walked
    through every water stop and drank 2 or 3 cups of water, took a GU
    pack every other water stop, and was in good enough shape to finish in
    around 3 hours then my experience was similar to what other people
    describe in a marathon. If I had a bad day and was out on the course
    for more than 3:20 or so then I had the same problems that you do. If
    I tried to drink more water, as suggested above, then I would get sick
    and toss. I simply can not process the water intake as fast as I can
    sweat it out.

    On an interesting note, when the weather is hot and the race is short
    (5 miles or less) I have found that I can run further up in the pack
    then normal and still compete. If my body has enough water stores
    then it will handle the heat better than others. I also make sure
    that I "splash" the other runners and I always get my choice of lines.
    Gross, but effective.

    Mark
     
  9. Steve W.

    Steve W. Guest

    Steve,
    Check your hydration by the number of pit stops you
    need to make. If you don't pee at least twice you
    aren't drinking enough.

    Low energy is a different issue. I think you need
    calculate your total calorie intake. Assuming 6
    hours for the event and about 250 calories per
    hour you need to consume 1500 calories. That is
    alot of sports drink at 135 calories per bottle.

    There are several other sources for calories:
    gels, bars, high calorie liquids & real food.
    Experiment in training. IMHO sports drink alone
    isn't enough for a 1/2 IM or longer.

    Steve W.



    "Steve Shattuck" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On a 85+ degree day with 90% + humidity, I easily sweat out 4 pounds of
    > water per hour. I drink as much as I can, using Accelerade or Powerade but
    > after about 3 hours, assuming I'm in the middle of a half ironman, I feel
    > drained. Is this possibly because I cannot replenish as much as I'm losing.
    > In addition to the above, I take Lava salt capsules and Enervit GT tablets.
    > Going through all of the above, at least I've solved my muscle cramping
    > issue but the energy issue is still out there.
    > Help me if you can.
    > Steve
     
  10. >Not necessarily true

    Do it for a year, and your body is trained. Taking water in a less than 1.5
    hour run is not neccasary if you train yourself properly.
     
  11. >Experiment in training. IMHO sports drink alone
    >isn't enough for a 1/2 IM or longer.


    Agreed.
     
  12. On 03 Aug 2004 23:34:22 GMT, [email protected] (TheBillRodgerz)
    wrote:

    >>Not necessarily true

    >
    >Do it for a year, and your body is trained. Taking water in a less than 1.5
    >hour run is not neccasary if you train yourself properly.


    Utter bullshit!

    It would appear that your lack of knowledge, combined with your
    unwillingness to open your mind, and the fact that you have lost sight
    of everything but the inside of your lower large intestine, is making
    your comments in the tread worthless.

    You can not train yourself to sweat less, and your body's ability to
    process water is controlled by many factors, most of which are beyond
    your control. A well trained person will begin to sweat quicker and
    reach their maximum sweat rate quicker than an untrained person, but
    the maximum sweat rate is different for various people and can not be
    externally controlled. Think of sweating as a valve that opens to let
    water flow. If my valve opens more than someone elses, but both of
    our water intake capabilities are the same, I will dehydrate quicker
    if we replace water at the same rate.

    Yes, I can train my body to function better when I am slightly to
    moderately dehydrated, but that is not what is being discussed here.
    And even with training, there is a loss in performance that is
    measurable.

    In other words, if you are a heavy sweater you are probably screwed in
    a long race in warm weather.

    Mark
     
  13. >Utter bullshit!

    Yes, your comments are. What are you, like 13 years old? You must be a complete
    idiot to believe your crap. I run 9 miles a day. What qualifications do you
    bring to the table moron?

    >in the tread worthless.


    At least I can spell thread you idiot.

    >You can not train yourself to sweat less,


    No idiot you can't, but you can train to be more efficent, and this eludes many
    of todays so called "atheletes" who load up on Goos, and crap to make their
    runs. This has opened the field up to a whole bunch of punk, wussies (like you)
    who instead of training rely on gimmicks, because without them you are
    incapable.

    >body's ability to
    >process water is controlled by many factors, most of which are beyond
    >your control.


    Certainly beyond yours, because your too ignorant to know how to properly train
    for it.

    >Yes, I can train my body to function better when I am slightly to
    >moderately dehydrated


    If that's what you call efficent running, I see your problem. You are a knob
    (tree stump).

    >In other words, if you are a heavy sweater you are probably screwed in
    >a long race in warm weather.


    LOLOLOL what a moron.
     
  14. >And even with training, there is a loss in performance that is
    >measurable.


    In your mind, possibly. But since you've never trained properly, and have no
    clue as to how to do it, you couldn't possibly know.



    >if you are a heavy sweater


    Yeah, I'm a cardigan.
     
  15. Dan Stumpus

    Dan Stumpus Guest

    "Steve Shattuck" <[email protected]> wrote

    First off, you are not alone, and yes, you can learn to deal with it. I run
    ultras lasting from 5 to 8 hours, and it took me quite a while to get my
    salt and hydration right.

    > On a 85+ degree day with 90% + humidity, I easily sweat out 4 pounds of
    > water per hour.


    Some of that loss is glycogen consumption, which is ok.

    Just curious--what's your BMI? (http://www.halls.md/body-mass-index/av.htm)
    Higher body mass people tend to sweat more.

    I've emptied a 2 liter camelback (4 1/4 lbs) in a one hour climb at 95
    degrees, so you are above average, but not off the scale. And I'm only 5-8
    and 150 lbs.

    > I drink as much as I can, using Accelerade or Powerade


    Do you meter your drinking? I usually use bottles--it's easy to see how
    much you're drinking. I trained myself to drink every 15 minutes (8 to 12
    oz depending on the conditions). I do this even on a short 1 hour training
    run. During a race, I drink like clockwork to ensure I don't get behind the
    curve.

    In my last race, I drank 40 oz/hour, and after 7:30 finished 5 lbs lighter
    than I started. So I will drink a bit more next time if it's hot.

    Salt is very important on long races: you need about a gram of sodium for
    each quart you sweat. That's about 1 succeed capsule (625 mg of sodium) per
    20 oz bottle you drink. If you get low on salt, your stomach won't drain
    and what you drink will slosh around. Because your stomach is full, you
    don't want to drink, and you dig yourself a hole. If you're sloshing, take
    another capsule.

    With Succeed caps, I can drink and absorb it as quickly as I sweat.

    > but after about 3 hours, assuming I'm in the middle of a half ironman, I

    feel
    > drained.


    If you're dehydrated, nothing works right -- you overheat, get nauseated,
    your muscles use more glycogen, and you cramp up.

    > Is this possibly because I cannot replenish as much as I'm losing.
    > In addition to the above, I take Lava salt capsules and Enervit GT

    tablets.

    1. Train yourself to drink at a high rate (eg, x ounces every 15 minutes).
    2. Take 600 mg of sodium (1 Succeed cap) every 16-20 oz you drink to
    promote stomach emptying.

    I used to think that I could never get enough liquid in me, until I learned
    about the importance of salt in in emptying the stomach. I'd drink, but
    with my stomach full the last thing I wanted to do was drink more. All the
    while I was becoming more and more dehydrated.

    > Going through all of the above, at least I've solved my muscle cramping
    > issue


    I found that I cramp up if I lose 5% or more of my body weight. When I
    finally learned how to drink, the cramps went away.

    > but the energy issue is still out there.
    > Help me if you can.


    Most ultra guys I know consume about 300 calories per hour during
    competition, mostly from drink, with gels, ensure, or other snacks thrown
    in. My favorite is little pieces of pizza or mexican food. Some can eat
    more and do fine; I find that digesting too much slows me down.

    If you're getting your calories, and are still in the dumpster, then I'd
    look at hydration, and finally at pacing. Half way through a 50 miler, I'm
    tired, but I can maintain my pace to the end. The trick is to conserve your
    glycogen. You need glycogen to burn fat, strange as it may sound.

    -- Dan
     
  16. >Just curious--what's your BMI?

    Dude, why do you care what his BM's look like? I've never heard of feces being
    related to running.
     
  17. Steve W.

    Steve W. Guest

    Mark and Christine <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 03 Aug 2004 17:23:48 GMT, [email protected] (TheBillRodgerz)
    > wrote:
    >
    > When I was running marathons a few years ago I found that if I walked
    > through every water stop and drank 2 or 3 cups of water, took a GU
    > pack every other water stop, and was in good enough shape to finish in
    > around 3 hours then my experience was similar to what other people
    > describe in a marathon. If I had a bad day and was out on the course
    > for more than 3:20 or so then I had the same problems that you do. If
    > I tried to drink more water, as suggested above, then I would get sick
    > and toss. I simply can not process the water intake as fast as I can
    > sweat it out.


    While everyone is different, 400 calories per hour is way over the norm
    especially at marathon intensity. Eating 13 GUs in three hours, WOW!
    That's a tough stomich.

    Steve W.
     
  18. \El Paisano\

    \El Paisano\ Guest

    "Steve W." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Mark and Christine <[email protected]> wrote in message

    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > On 03 Aug 2004 17:23:48 GMT, [email protected] (TheBillRodgerz)
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > When I was running marathons a few years ago I found that if I walked
    > > through every water stop and drank 2 or 3 cups of water, took a GU
    > > pack every other water stop, and was in good enough shape to finish in
    > > around 3 hours then my experience was similar to what other people
    > > describe in a marathon. If I had a bad day and was out on the course
    > > for more than 3:20 or so then I had the same problems that you do. If
    > > I tried to drink more water, as suggested above, then I would get sick
    > > and toss. I simply can not process the water intake as fast as I can
    > > sweat it out.

    >
    > While everyone is different, 400 calories per hour is way over the norm
    > especially at marathon intensity. Eating 13 GUs in three hours, WOW!
    > That's a tough stomich.
    >

    And a thick wallet. And a big fanny pack. But perhaps there wasn't a water
    station at every mile.
     
  19. \El Paisano\

    \El Paisano\ Guest

    "Steve W." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Mark and Christine <[email protected]> wrote in message

    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > On 03 Aug 2004 17:23:48 GMT, [email protected] (TheBillRodgerz)
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > When I was running marathons a few years ago I found that if I walked
    > > through every water stop and drank 2 or 3 cups of water, took a GU
    > > pack every other water stop, and was in good enough shape to finish in
    > > around 3 hours then my experience was similar to what other people
    > > describe in a marathon. If I had a bad day and was out on the course
    > > for more than 3:20 or so then I had the same problems that you do. If
    > > I tried to drink more water, as suggested above, then I would get sick
    > > and toss. I simply can not process the water intake as fast as I can
    > > sweat it out.

    >
    > While everyone is different, 400 calories per hour is way over the norm
    > especially at marathon intensity. Eating 13 GUs in three hours, WOW!
    > That's a tough stomich.
    >

    And a thick wallet. And a big fanny pack. But perhaps there wasn't a water
    station at every mile.
     
  20. On Wed, 4 Aug 2004 13:52:41 -0600, "\"El Paisano\""
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Steve W." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> Mark and Christine <[email protected]> wrote in message

    >news:<[email protected]>...
    >> > On 03 Aug 2004 17:23:48 GMT, [email protected] (TheBillRodgerz)
    >> > wrote:
    >> >
    >> > When I was running marathons a few years ago I found that if I walked
    >> > through every water stop and drank 2 or 3 cups of water, took a GU
    >> > pack every other water stop, and was in good enough shape to finish in

    >>
    >> While everyone is different, 400 calories per hour is way over the norm
    >> especially at marathon intensity. Eating 13 GUs in three hours, WOW!
    >> That's a tough stomich.
    >>

    >And a thick wallet. And a big fanny pack. But perhaps there wasn't a water
    >station at every mile.


    I should have stated that in most of the marathons that I run/ran,
    there were water stops every 5K, give or take, based on good places to
    set them up.

    I don't think I have ever seen a marathon with water stops more often
    than every 2 miles.

    Mark
     
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