Program training for 60 Km road race.



Cpro

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Jan 27, 2012
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Please i need a detailed program of training for a road race 60 Km nearly 1st june.
Now im making distances 37 km, with an average 25 Km/h so im not very experienced,
I need a scedule of training weekly, with warmup, coolut, and interval trainings to maximize speed cruising and distance.
I need your opinions for that.
 

danfoz

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Apr 12, 2011
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Unfortunately that is a request for a very labor intensive answer. The good thing is if you search the forums deep enough, or visit a decent bookstore the information is available.

Another good thing, if you are not very experienced, you do not really need a very detailed program and simply riding 4 or 5 times a week for an hour or two for a couple of months, and then adding a couple longer rides of 3 hours in the third month will get you to improve. Slowly build up your mileage so that you are able to comfortably ride 1.5 times the distance of your race (80-90k). Include hills on your ride, that is like having built in intervals. Structured intervals at this point will serve no good purpose. Ride with other experienced cyclists to get used to riding in a group when possible. 4 months is a very short time to go from being inexperienced to entering your first race, even if it's entry level.

Don't worry if you don't achieve the result you desired, use the experience to learn from. Bicycle racing is an artform that takes a long time to master, several years maybe. That is part of the beauty of this sport.

Someone once asked Morihei Ueshiba what the secret of Aikido was. The answer was simply "to show up".
 

Cpro

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Jan 27, 2012
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Someone told me to put intervals training on my scedule to maximize the speed cruising. But i dont know the base for this if is heart, power, time, or distance, the cadence of this. And such a lot of information. Which is the speed cruising that you suggest to bring this out, the average speed?I ve already training for about 1 and half hour with bicycle nearly 3 years but this is a mtb, and now is Road Race bike. So you think that i must build up mileage to 80-90 kms, two months before the race?
The Road bike i think is the best exercise for full body and especially foots.
 

danfoz

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Apr 12, 2011
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Having been riding for 3 years makes a difference, doesn't matter what kind of bike. Regular rides of 40k is not bad in the context of a 60k race, but others have probably been riding far more for this distance race. Riding 60k and racing 60k are very different unless you don't mind being the lantern rouge, the last rider to finish. Increasing mileage is best done in steps. If you are comfortable riding 80-90k 2 months out or 1 month out won't imo make a big difference.

Riding shorter distances at faster speed is a good way to increase average speed, the interval. It's best to do intervals once you have a level of basic fitness, however they will improve fitness regardless. Don't worry about the speed in kph you reach during the interval, it's really about level of effort. Imagine someone much fitter, both of you would do the same interval at different speeds.

There are many different types of intervals but to reduce these to two basic types makes things easier. There are many variations.

To keep it simple let's just call them the long interval (the threshold interval) and the short (VO2 max) interval. Even with these the length of time and intensity could vary but again we'll just keep it simple for now. Personally I keep a pretty similar cadence whatever the intensity I am riding at (90-105), but when climbing the cadence drops a bit. These are my personal preferences, others do it differently, this is one of the things that takes time, learning what is best for you.

Ok, the long interval: anywhere from 10-20 minutes. I usually start at around 10-12 minutes, and around 80-85% of my MaxHR, faster than tempo, but slightly slower than my time trial pace. I increase the length of time as the season progresses. After a good level of fitness achieved by just riding for a couple months I'll add these. 2x10 minutes in the first couple weeks, then 3x10 the next couple weeks, 3x15, 2x20, etc. slowly increasing the time of the interval, not the intensity.This is not a rule, others do it different, ramp it up different, that's them. Twice a week on these workouts for me. These intervals help to increase your cruising speed. If you don't have an HR monitor, it would be approximately 7 on a scale of 1-10 imo. Only short sentences possible or maybe faster. Once fit, you could do these year round. My rule of thumb for rest between: .5 to 1 So for a twenty minute interval I am resting 10 minutes between each. I often do these as hard as I can go or close to it for that time-frame (which I guess is technically my TT pace).

The short interval: my personal favorite is between 2-3 minutes. These are tough. 89-92% of MaxHR. 9 on a scale of 1-10, pretty much all out but not a sprint. I do these starting 4-5 weeks before the opening season race, some like to start 6 weeks out, or more. Week 1 would be something like 3x2mins, or 3x3mins. I would not do this workout more than twice a week. Each week I would add a repetition. So by the 4th week it would be 5x2mins. Some people break these into sets with a bigger rest between. i.e. 2[3x3min]. Rule of thumb for rest is 1 to 1. So for a 2 min interval, 2 mins of rest between reps, a 3 minute, 3 mins of rest between each (a 2:1 rest between multiple sets. i.e 6 minutes for a 3min interval set). Some like more rest, some like less rest. But too much rest between and your body won't adapt as quickly to processing lactate. Because heart rate lags, it is easy to start these too hard. Some like to start explosively (at max effort), I like to build up to max over 20 seconds or so. If you cannot complete your set, you went out too hard. If you are not pretty tired after you finish, you went to easy. In my opinion the real value of this exercise, aside from being able to increase your bodies capacity to process lactic acid, is learning how your body works at red line, right on the edge of your own abilities, without going over, also known as "blowing up". Some like to do them a little longer, an intensity maintainable for 5 minutes or so, which would target many of the same energy systems. The 2-3 minute variety both improve capacity to carry oxygen as well as process lactate, like killing two birds with one stone. If I were doing the long version of the "VO2" interval (5 or 6 minutes) then I would also be doing shorter, harder, 1 minute efforts with more reps (up to 10) to focus solely on the ability to process lactate. i.e. breaking the short version into 2 further categories. These workouts are both very mentally as well as physically demanding because of the difficulty.

Because the short interval significantly increase the overall workload it is good to bring down the length of your long distance rides a little as you increase the intensity of your workouts. And getting ready to race I would stop doing any real intensity at least a week or so out so you are fresh for your race.

The better your aerobic base, the easier it is to recover from these workouts. Think of your fitness as a pyramid with the aerobic stuff (65-80% of maxHR) making up the base, with the short intervals at the tip of the pyramid. It's a very stable structure. Try to turn the pyramid upside down (intervals without a solid level of basic fitness) and it will easily topple over. It's what I like to refer to as "fragile" top-end fitness. Stronger and faster, but fitness gains (which can be quite substantial if out of shape) will be short lived and dissipate quickly. When seasoned athletes get sick and are off the bike this is the stuff that disappears first, the base remaining largely intact.

I have written only a few paragraphs, there are entire books dedicated to this. This is a simplified approach.

I would still put more focus on slowly increasing the mileage so you able to ride more than the race distance quite easily. Then worry about the speed work. 4 months is certainly enough time.


... a labor intensive answer. [Edit: But with no objection. It'll will be helpful to find others to ride with and learn how to ride comfortably in someone's draft. One of the big diffs between road and mountain is conserving energy this way. Not too close because when wheels overlap the guy in the back usually goes down, and not to far because then there's no benefit. Solo speeds are not indicative of race speeds which are usually quite a bit higher because of the aerodynamic gestalt of the peleton. But for an entry level category race 30+kph solo cruising speed would be better, large group speeds can quickly exceed 40kph and by quite a bit when it's hammer time. Don't be discouraged if you can only do 30kph+ for a short time, when Michael Hutchinson attempted the hour record, a few months out he could only maintain the speed he needed to beat the record for a few minutes, not even close to sixty minutes! He didn't ultimately beat it, but he came pretty close. There's some other edits too.]
 

Cpro

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Jan 27, 2012
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Danfoz thank you for your time honesty, this was a very detailed answer for my needs. I keep training and learning about this, because i figured that i like it too much. I will tell you the results of this course of course!!!!
 

An old Guy

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Feb 12, 2011
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Originally Posted by Cpro .

But i dont know the base for this if is heart, power, time, or distance, the cadence of this.
Danfoz made some suggestions based on percentage of heart rate. I have no objections. Just a comment.

It is hard to pinpoint the actual heart rate number from a percentage. Depending on the coach and "system" the 100% number is somewhere between the lactate threshhold number and the absolute max. And the 0% number is somewhere between 0 and a "resting" number. 90% might vary by 10 beats per minute depending on what you use.

On the road it is very hard to keep your heart rate steady within a reasonable range.

Don't take the numbers too seriously. (I like to think that as I get in better condition that I will be able to sustain a higher effort for the same heart rate.)
 

danfoz

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Apr 12, 2011
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Not only that, because HR lags behind effort, it's tough to quantify the starting effort of a 2min interval in those terms, unless looking at the data post-ride. And easy to go out too hard. That's where one of the very apparent benefits of a PM comes in to play.
 

Cpro

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Jan 27, 2012
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Please my problems this time are that:
1. I m searching a way to calculate the lactate threshold except laboratory, is there any way to do that?
2. I'm also searching a way to calculte the Vo2 Max, is there a way to do this?
3. The Vo2 Max, increased with short intervals as i understand, but for what reason an athlete need to increase his own Vo2 Max?
4.A 50/16 high gear is sufficient to finish a solo 100 miles in under 5 hours. A 50/14 is sufficient to finish in under 4 hours. Unless you are a pro anything higher is just pretending "what is the 50/16"?
5. You suggest to make training of short intervals Vo2 Max, and long intervals lactate threshold individual or is possible to make them to the same training day?
I ask this because my training plan is one day per week only uphill, and the others days of training will include short, long intervals and increase distance per weak at 5Km until comfortably ride 80 Km.
 

swampy1970

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Feb 3, 2008
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Originally Posted by Cpro .

Please my problems this time are that:
1. I m searching a way to calculate the lactate threshold except laboratory, is there any way to do that?
2. I'm also searching a way to calculte the Vo2 Max, is there a way to do this?
3. The Vo2 Max, increased with short intervals as i understand, but for what reason an athlete need to increase his own Vo2 Max?
4.A 50/16 high gear is sufficient to finish a solo 100 miles in under 5 hours. A 50/14 is sufficient to finish in under 4 hours. Unless you are a pro anything higher is just pretending "what is the 50/16"?
5. You suggest to make training of short intervals Vo2 Max, and long intervals lactate threshold individual or is possible to make them to the same training day?
I ask this because my training plan is one day per week only uphill, and the others days of training will include short, long intervals and increase distance per weak at 5Km until comfortably ride 80 Km.

1. Go out and ride at a very hard pace that you can just about maintain for an hour. That's your threshold. Alternatively, do 3 intervals of 20 minutes each and what you can routinely do for the last two intervals in training is similar to what you could mostly likely ride at for a 40km TT.

2. As above but for 5 to 8 minutes.

3. Because you need too. :p

Instead of trying to get the details for every last little bit of info at this stage of the game, knowing that you need to raise your sustainable power and short term power will achieve the same results. Think 1 hour effort, 5 minutes effort, 1 minutes effort and if you can't sprint worth a damn, 5 to 15 second effort.

4. Most think they refer to chainring/sprocket combinations... but they're actually the brain cells that one has before and after trying to understand Old Guy. 50/ probably refers to 50^50 and 14 is, sadly, just that.

5. You can train them in the same day. Ride sub threshold for a couple of hours and throw in some hard 5 minute TT efforts up a small hill or one the flat heading towards a specific marker like a town sign.

Try for 10km a week rather than 5km. If you're new to all this, initial improvements will likely happen quick and even 12km is only an extra 30 minutes at your current pace.

The first thing you need to get sorted out is the position on the bike (seat, bars etc etc)
 

Cpro

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Jan 27, 2012
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1Quote: Originally Posted by swampy1970 .



1. Go out and ride at a very hard pace that you can just about maintain for an hour. That's your threshold. Alternatively, do 3 intervals of 20 minutes each and what you can routinely do for the last two intervals in training is similar to what you could mostly likely ride at for a 40km TT.

2. As above but for 5 to 8 minutes.

3. Because you need too. :p

Instead of trying to get the details for every last little bit of info at this stage of the game, knowing that you need to raise your sustainable power and short term power will achieve the same results. Think 1 hour effort, 5 minutes effort, 1 minutes effort and if you can't sprint worth a damn, 5 to 15 second effort.

4. Most think they refer to chainring/sprocket combinations... but they're actually the brain cells that one has before and after trying to understand Old Guy. 50/ probably refers to 50^50 and 14 is, sadly, just that.

5. You can train them in the same day. Ride sub threshold for a couple of hours and throw in some hard 5 minute TT efforts up a small hill or one the flat heading towards a specific marker like a town sign.

Try for 10km a week rather than 5km. If you're new to all this, initial improvements will likely happen quick and even 12km is only an extra 30 minutes at your current pace.

The first thing you need to get sorted out is the position on the bike (seat, bars etc etc)



1. You mean that lactate threshold is the average heart bpm after make this one hour exercise?
2. I heard that short intervals must be harder that longest intervals (the first one must be 10/10 hard when the seconds one must be at 8/10 tough per my power or heart pulse).
3. The Vo2 max, is need to use more oxygen when im tired?
4.Ok for this.
5.The position i think is ok in this time.
 

rxter

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Oct 15, 2011
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Great posts gents. I am getting pretty fit now after 5 months on the saddle. On my long ride days I've done 75 miles in the flats and 50 in rolling hills at around 15 and 13.5 mph, respectively. I hit the street every morning. My week usually looks like this

1) mixed small hills and flats - 75 minutes
2) flats as fast as I can go - 75 minutes
3) mixed small hills and flats - 75 minutes
4) bigger hills - 75 minutes
5) lazy garbage ride (looking at the scenery and enjoying life) - 90 minutes
6) long ride - 3 to 5 hours
7) rest

Does it look like I'm doing any Vo2 or interval or threshold stuff? I know that I sweat like hell ;)

Feels like I am hitting the wall a bit with speed. My gains are now measure in a minute or so, 1/10th mph.

Thanks
 

danfoz

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Apr 12, 2011
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Originally Posted by rxter .

Does it look like I'm doing any Vo2 or interval or threshold stuff? I know that I sweat like hell ;)

Feels like I am hitting the wall a bit with speed. My gains are now measure in a minute or so, 1/10th mph.
Maybe on the hills? Hard to tell what your actual intensity is by speed alone as there are many factors including headwind, etc., but the body itself doesn't ascribe to acedemic definitions of intensity. On a fixed course where conditions are relatively similar throughout the year is as good a ballpark as any to measure of progress over time. If you are cranking to the top of a climb that takes between 3 and 7 minutes at a constant effort and are hitting the top unable to ride further without easing up, very possibly.

Sometimes speed progress happens overnight, it can be a strange thing. You can quite literally wake up one day and just be faster. Maybe it's not your morning just yet. It's also possible that your body has adapted to whatever stress you are throwing at it and does need more to get stronger. Those 1/10mph increments might be attributable to other geophysical variants like wind, then moon's gravity, whatever. Regardless, any sustainable gains are good.

The long rides are good, even just once weekly. There is a school of thought that suggest the effects of one long brutal ride can last quite sometime by producing an excess of a hormone known as Interleukin6. It's ordinarily found in in Cancer patients but also in quite healthy endurance athletes, and who's levels have been found to be quite a bit higher after long, glycogen depleting workouts. Some have even gone so far as to call it the "endurance hormone" but the jury is still out as this research is still in it's infancy and mostly supported by anecdote, as in " Man 12 or 13 days after that century I could really ride like the wind".

PS. that's the same kinda mileage young Davey was doing before he seriously started training for (and won) the Hell of the West /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif
 

rxter

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Oct 15, 2011
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Thanks for the thoughts. Likely that I need to mix things up a bit to keep gaining.

I'm an old guy working for the fun and fitness of it, not to win any real race (only the race in my head). But I am very goal oriented and so I like to keep setting and achieving targets. My first target was a 50mile charity ride in April. I am pretty confident that I'll do this as long as no-one runs me over (I'm not a big fan of pack riding so I'll likely hang out near the back and enjoy the ride). My next target will be the same ride day next year but the 100 mile ride.

The interim steps are the weekly tracking of speed, total miles, hill rides, stuff like that.

I appreciate sharing from your and others experience here on the forum. It's been quite beneficial to me preparing for and while riding.