prostate problems and road bikes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Greg, Apr 11, 2006.

  1. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "(PeteCresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Per Derk:
    > >It's an inflammation of the prostate and it's cause can be either
    > >bacterial or unknown. If it's bacterial, you're lucky, because it
    > >can be treated with anti-biotics. therefore it's very important to
    > >have it diagnosed. If you are not lucky , it will go on gor ages and
    > >every time you think you got rid of it, it will come back.

    >
    > If it were me, I'd do a course of prostate-specific antibiotic no
    > matter what. The uro doesn't know whether it's an infection or not.
    > He can guess...and maybe he'll be right most of the time - but what
    > percentage accuracy can he claim? Does anybody even know what the
    > average doc's percentages are? They'd have to record the guess and
    > then biopsy the patient - and do that on a few hundred patients for
    > each doctor and do it over for some statistically significant number
    > of doctors..... I don't think so.


    Your doc can easily check for bacterial infections of the prostate.
    There's a fairly unpleasant technique for getting a sample that involves
    no needles (biopsy is only necessary if prostate cancer is being ruled
    out) but does involve "the position" and a rubber glove...
     


  2. Derk

    Derk Guest

    (PeteCresswell) wrote:

    > If it were me, I'd do a course of prostate-specific antibiotic no matter
    > what.

    That's dumb, since this is the way to create resistent bacteria in the
    future. There's no need to take them if they're no pathogenic bacteria
    present.

    > The uro doesn't know whether it's an infection or not. He can
    > guess...and maybe he'll be right most of the time - but what percentage
    > accuracy can he claim?

    Of course he does and this is the ways he knows it: (and this is no fun
    either) the urologists massages your prostate with a finger to get some
    fluid out, which is then examined in the lab for presence of bacteria.


    > As I (who has no medical training/experience whatsoever) understand it,
    > part of the problem with prostate infections is that the longer they go
    > on, the more of that spongy glandular tissue gets bacteria in it.

    No, there is 50% chance there won't be bacteria.

    Gr, Derk
     
  3. Derk

    Derk Guest

    Tim McNamara wrote:


    > Your doc can easily check for bacterial infections of the prostate.
    > There's a fairly unpleasant technique for getting a sample that involves
    > no needles (biopsy is only necessary if prostate cancer is being ruled
    > out) but does involve "the position" and a rubber glove...

    yep. But it can be worse: I was told by the urologist that they sometimes
    would use the following technique, that most men refuse: a (big) echo
    device is inserted and then they can see an image of the prostate on a
    monitor. They seem to do this mostly to examine enlarged prostates, but for
    100% certainty they also like do this for examining prostatitis. I also
    said "no thanks" to this btw.

    Prostatitis is a very nasty thing that takes ages to cure if the cause isn't
    bacterial. Since you have nothing to lose as a patient, I would take my
    bike, ride to the market and stuff loads of broccoli in the bike-bags :)

    To th eoriginal poster: it could of course be a coincidence that prostate
    pain begins after riding a new saddle. It looks like there's a relationship
    when 2 things coincide, but it doesnt have to be that way.

    Gr, Derk
     
  4. Per Tim McNamara:
    >Your doc can easily check for bacterial infections of the prostate.
    >There's a fairly unpleasant technique for getting a sample that involves
    >no needles (biopsy is only necessary if prostate cancer is being ruled
    >out) but does involve "the position" and a rubber glove...


    Been there, done that. Better than a guess, but if it's negative it still
    doesn't mean there is no infection - my conclusion, at least from repeated
    situations where it was negative but a course of antibiotic stopped the pain.
    It's happened too often to be a placebo effect.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >I normally ride a TREK carbon fiber bike with Koobi saddle with
    >cutout, and have never had problems with numbness. Lately, I have been
    >riding a Litespeed (more stiff), and have had slight pain, and I have
    >been messing around with different saddles and position. On Sunday, I
    >took out my hybrid, more upright position and a squishy seat, and
    >rode it 2 hrs like a road bke. Now I think I have hurt the prostate.
    >It's not numbness, it's a low level burning sensation down there, and
    >it's been there for 48 hrs. Urologists call it referal pain. I am
    >going to the urologist Monday, but I'm afraid he will tell me to quit
    >riding. I'm 52 yrs old, and ride about 150 miles a week on the road
    >bike. I don't think it's as simple as a perinial artery problem. Any
    >ideas? Anybody else struggle with this? Any good saddles that don't
    >pressure the prostate?


    That you have had no problems riding your Trek means that you are having
    some fit issues with the other bikes. Best bet is to get the same saddle
    on all your bikes and adjust the to have the same height and tilt.
    ---------------
    Alex
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >I would suggest Castration. There will be no more problems "down
    >there". You will be able to focus better.


    Is your focus better now?
    -------------
    Alex
     
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