protecting saddle + post from theft?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Sanjay Punjab, Aug 4, 2003.

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  1. I recently had my saddle and seat post stolen off my bike. I had allen screws securing both, not
    quick release levers. Is there a way to secure the saddle and seat post better to a bike? Locking
    the saddle frame to the triangle of the bike frame could atleast help protect the saddle, but a
    relatively thin cable lock can be cut easily. I am looking for some effective ideas to secure
    both. Thanks
     
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  2. Sam Huffman

    Sam Huffman Guest

    [email protected] (Sanjay Punjab) writes:

    > I recently had my saddle and seat post stolen off my bike. I had allen screws securing both, not
    > quick release levers. Is there a way to secure the saddle and seat post better to a bike?
    > Locking the saddle frame to the triangle of the bike frame could atleast help protect the
    > saddle, but a relatively thin cable lock can be cut easily. I am looking for some effective
    > ideas to secure both.

    There are cables that you can use to "secure" the seat. Basically they loop around the mechanism
    bolting the seat to the post, and around the frame.

    This requires that the seat be removed from the post before removing the post from the bicycle. Or,
    alternatively, the thief could use a wire-cutters. I'd imagine using one is somewhat more effective
    than not using one, and my seat made it through two years on a college campus without being stolen.
    That is, until I made the mistake of locking my bicycle to a tree.

    Sam
     
  3. Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (Steven) wrote:
    >
    > >And hearing all the noise in the Giro etc. about bike manafactures being able to make a bike
    > >signifigantly less than the 16.5 pounds that the UCI set's as the lower limit of weight. My
    > >thought is essentially this, why not make that bike but throw extra weight back in by making the
    > >drive train more efficient.
    > >
    > >Lets say that for arguments sake the average pro cylist puts out 400 watts during a climb up alp
    > >d'huez and his drive train is 90% effecient.
    >
    > Thing is, the data I've seen suggest a clean, well-adjusted drivetrain is closer to 98% efficient.
    > That doesn't leave a lot of room for improvement (at least not without spending a fortune on a
    > chain with itty bitty little bearings in every link).
    >
    > That number hasn't changed in recent history, either - probably won't in the near future.
    >
    > Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame

    www.ihpva.org/pubs/HP52.pdf

    This study puts the effecieny of Shimano 7 speed derailer hubs at
    94.5%-90.3% effecient. I am not sure what has changed since 2001....I would imagine effeciency has
    improved but probably not to 98%, although I have been wrong a few times in my life so....Where
    did you get this number? I would love to read read the research you got this number from.

    SPA

    This is not backed up by the research I could find. The best effecieny rating I could find was 98.6%
    but it was for a large rear cogged single speed drive train, taking the
     
  4. Thunder9

    Thunder9 Guest

    On 04 Aug 2003 07:33:34 -0700, Sam Huffman <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] (Sanjay Punjab) writes:
    >
    >> I recently had my saddle and seat post stolen off my bike. I had allen screws securing both, not
    >> quick release levers. Is there a way to secure the saddle and seat post better to a bike?
    >> Locking the saddle frame to the triangle of the bike frame could atleast help protect the
    >> saddle, but a relatively thin cable lock can be cut easily. I am looking for some effective
    >> ideas to secure both.
    >
    >There are cables that you can use to "secure" the seat. Basically they loop around the mechanism
    >bolting the seat to the post, and around the frame.
    >
    >This requires that the seat be removed from the post before removing the post from the bicycle. Or,
    >alternatively, the thief could use a wire-cutters. I'd imagine using one is somewhat more effective
    >than not using one, and my seat made it through two years on a college campus without being stolen.
    >That is, until I made the mistake of locking my bicycle to a tree.
    >
    >Sam

    What does locking a bike to a tree have to do with stealing a seat?

    Is seat stealing a common occurance? Does that happen more often than bike stealing (ie seat
    stealing only vs. complete bike stealing)?

    I think one could go a bit overboard trying to secure things on a bike. Perhaps the best deterrent
    would be to make the seat *look* like it isn't worth stealing.

    Regards, Thunder9
     
  5. Sam Huffman

    Sam Huffman Guest

    [email protected] (Thunder9) writes:

    > >This requires that the seat be removed from the post before removing the post from the bicycle.
    > >Or, alternatively, the thief could use a wire-cutters. I'd imagine using one is somewhat more
    > >effective than not using one, and my seat made it through two years on a college campus without
    > >being stolen. That is, until I made the mistake of locking my bicycle to a tree.
    >
    > What does locking a bike to a tree have to do with stealing a seat?

    The seat didn't get stolen by itself. On college campuses, locking a bicycle to a tree is (as I
    found out) a sure way to get the bike stolen. The thief simply cuts down the tree. A bike locked to
    a street sign is a similarly easy target.

    > Is seat stealing a common occurance? Does that happen more often than bike stealing (ie seat
    > stealing only vs. complete bike stealing)?

    It's extremely common. Stealing a bike usually requires cutting a lock or chain. Stealing a seatpost
    often simply requires opening a quick release and putting the seat in a bag.

    > I think one could go a bit overboard trying to secure things on a bike. Perhaps the best deterrent
    > would be to make the seat *look* like it isn't worth stealing.

    On a college campus, anything that can be stolen will be stolen. I've seen studies indicating that
    10% of all bikes on a college campus are stolen each year.

    sam
     
  6. Gary Young

    Gary Young Guest

    [email protected] (Sanjay Punjab) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I recently had my saddle and seat post stolen off my bike. I had allen screws securing both, not
    > quick release levers. Is there a way to secure the saddle and seat post better to a bike? Locking
    > the saddle frame to the triangle of the bike frame could atleast help protect the saddle, but a
    > relatively thin cable lock can be cut easily. I am looking for some effective ideas to secure
    > both. Thanks

    Both Kryptonite and Pitlock (www.pitlock.com) make locking seattube skewers. That won't prevent your
    saddle from being stolen off of the post. When that happened to me, I switched to a two-bolt
    seatpost (the more you can slow thieves down the better) and use wax or silicon to close the hex
    holes. Here in NYC, no one trusts the thin cables you're referring to. The popular thing to do is
    take a length of chain (drivetrain chain), cover it with a length of inner tube, run it through the
    seatstays and the saddle rails and then close the loop with a chain tool.
     
  7. Don Wiss

    Don Wiss Guest

    On 4 Aug 2003 13:03:05 -0700, [email protected] (Gary Young) wrote:

    > Here in NYC, no one trusts the thin cables you're referring to. The popular thing to do is take
    > a length of chain (drivetrain chain), cover it with a length of inner tube, run it through the
    > seatstays and the saddle rails and then close the loop with a chain tool.

    Yes. My understanding is bolt cutters tend to crush the chain and not cut
    it. Also electrical tape is often used to close the gap between the inner tube ends. Not that
    thieves carry chain tools, but they'd also have to carry a knife to get to the chain. Anyway, I
    am not aware of anyone that has lost a seat chained down this way.

    The one seat I lost was when I removed the quick release and used an allen head bolt. I didn't leave
    the bike more than 10 minutes. I gather the thief had vise grips with him to get it off.

    Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
     
  8. tock

    tock Guest

    "Sanjay Punjab" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I recently had my saddle and seat post stolen off my bike. I had allen screws securing both, not
    > quick release levers. Is there a way to secure the saddle and seat post better to a bike? Locking
    > the saddle frame to the triangle of the bike frame could atleast help protect the saddle, but a
    > relatively thin cable lock can be cut easily. I am looking for some effective ideas to secure
    > both. Thanks

    If you can get the seat adjusted to a height you're happy with, you could weld it in place, or drill
    a hole through the post, bolt it in place, and mess up the threads so it couldn't be undone without
    a hacksaw.
     
  9. Ahhh, only in America...

    Who else would spend $4,000 fretting away every milligram of bicycle weight, only to load it down
    with 50 lbs of anchor chain to keep it from being stolen!
     
  10. Ant

    Ant Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<6uIXa.2166
    > If you can get the seat adjusted to a height you're happy with, you could weld it in place, or
    > drill a hole through the post, bolt it in place, and mess up the threads so it couldn't be undone
    > without a hacksaw.

    if your bike wasnt stupid light, a rivet or two would look a lot cleaner than a bolt, and would be
    more secure. you could always drill them out later. or for a beater-glue. you could just fill
    fastener heads with epoxy. use a punch (to break otu the epoxy) or a screw-extractor to remove
    later. or- perhaps even filling the fastener with something temporary like wax might work. stop a
    thief inserting an allen key without a whole lot of fussing about.

    thoughts,

    anthony
     
  11. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On 5 Aug 2003 07:33:16 -0700, [email protected] (beaver charlie) from
    http://groups.google.com/ wrote:

    >Ahhh, only in America...
    >
    >Who else would spend $4,000 fretting away every milligram of bicycle weight, only to load it down
    >with 50 lbs of anchor chain to keep it from being stolen!

    I don't think anyone here would be using a 4K bike as a townie.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace I represent a sardine!!
    12:47:19 PM 5 August 2003
     
  12. Pat

    Pat Guest

    x-no-archive:yes

    , [email protected] (beaver charlie) from
    >> >Ahhh, only in America...
    > >
    > >Who else would spend $4,000 fretting away every milligram of bicycle weight, only to load it down
    > >with 50 lbs of anchor chain to keep it from being stolen!

    >
    > I don't think anyone here would be using a 4K bike as a townie.

    Yeah, but then reality wouldn't sound so great, would it? When you badmouth somebody--or in this
    case, an entire country, exaggeration helps a lot.

    Pat in TX
     
  13. Tim Cain

    Tim Cain Guest

    "ant" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<6uIXa.2166
    > > If you can get the seat adjusted to a height you're happy with, you
    could
    > > weld it in place, or drill a hole through the post, bolt it in place,
    and
    > > mess up the threads so it couldn't be undone without a hacksaw.
    >
    > if your bike wasnt stupid light, a rivet or two would look a lot cleaner than a bolt, and would be
    > more secure. you could always drill them out later. or for a beater-glue. you could just fill
    > fastener heads with epoxy. use a punch (to break otu the epoxy) or a screw-extractor to remove
    > later. or- perhaps even filling the fastener with something temporary like wax might work. stop a
    > thief inserting an allen key without a whole lot of fussing about.

    In an Allen screw, a ball bearing to fit + clear bathroom silicone sealant is a good deterrent.

    Tim.

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.506 / Virus Database: 303 - Release Date: 01/08/03
     
  14. Bruni

    Bruni Guest

    The industrial types produce bolts/wrenches with a pin in the center of the socket, hole in wrench
    as "tamper proof". Discourages opportunistic theft. Tom

    --
    Bruni Bicycles "Where art meets science" brunibicycles.com
    410.426.3420 <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Sanjay Punjab" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I recently had my saddle and seat post stolen off my bike. I had allen screws securing both, not
    > > quick release levers. Is there a way to secure the saddle and seat post better to a bike?
    > > Locking the saddle frame to the triangle of the bike frame could atleast help protect the
    > > saddle, but a relatively thin cable lock can be cut easily. I am looking for some effective
    > > ideas to secure both. Thanks
    >
    > If you can get the seat adjusted to a height you're happy with, you could weld it in place, or
    > drill a hole through the post, bolt it in place, and mess up the threads so it couldn't be undone
    > without a hacksaw.
     
  15. Paul Bielec

    Paul Bielec Guest

    take it with you

    "Sanjay Punjab" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I recently had my saddle and seat post stolen off my bike. I had allen screws securing both, not
    > quick release levers. Is there a way to secure the saddle and seat post better to a bike? Locking
    > the saddle frame to the triangle of the bike frame could atleast help protect the saddle, but a
    > relatively thin cable lock can be cut easily. I am looking for some effective ideas to secure
    > both. Thanks
     
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