Protective equipment



Response to John Hearns:
> As seen in the Times travel supplement on Saturday:
>
> http://www.baboongear.com/


It may for all I know be a good idea, but my first thought was still "If
just one child's **** is saved..."

--
Mark, UK

"One should as a rule respect public opinion in so far as is necessary to
avoid starvation and to keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond
this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny, and is likely to
interfere with happiness in all kinds of ways."
 
Mark McNeill wrote:
> Response to John Hearns:
>> As seen in the Times travel supplement on Saturday:
>>
>> http://www.baboongear.com/

>
> It may for all I know be a good idea, but my first thought was still "If
> just one child's **** is saved..."
>


But will it deter them from boarding? ;-)

--
Tony

"The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
right."
- Lord Hailsham
 
John Hearns wrote:
> As seen in the Times travel supplement on Saturday:
>
> http://www.baboongear.com/


Damn, I thought it had something to do with strapping an angry baboon
to your handlebars :) I have unfortunately broken my coccyx and can
say that its unbeleivably painful, still wouldnt be seen dead wearing
that tho.

Stan Cox
 
Response to Stan Cox:
> I have unfortunately broken my coccyx and can
> say that its unbeleivably painful, still wouldnt be seen dead wearing
> that tho.


According to the website, it can be worn next to the skin under your
shorts. You might have a bit of a VPL, though.

--
Mark, UK

"Between believing a thing and thinking you know is only a small step and
quickly taken."
 
Mark McNeill wrote:
> Response to Stan Cox:
>> I have unfortunately broken my coccyx and can
>> say that its unbeleivably painful, still wouldnt be seen dead wearing
>> that tho.

>
> According to the website, it can be worn next to the skin under your
> shorts. You might have a bit of a VPL, though.
>


And, using the h****t arguments, its going to make you bum bigger and
heavier which is not the world's best starting line for marketing ;-)

--
Tony

"The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
right."
- Lord Hailsham
 
Matt B wrote:
> "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:p[email protected]...
> > As seen in the Times travel supplement on Saturday:
> >
> > http://www.baboongear.com/

>
> It's use though may well be considered irresponsible my many, as it will
> surely increase the propensity to behave recklessly, and with less respect
> for others.


Yer right, the main use for this item is insulating your **** whilst
sitting invisible below a lip, toking up (I ski past snowboarders - but
I don't inhale)
 
Matt B wrote:
> "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:p[email protected]...
>> As seen in the Times travel supplement on Saturday:
>>
>> http://www.baboongear.com/

>
> It's use though may well be considered irresponsible my many, as it will
> surely increase the propensity to behave recklessly, and with less respect
> for others.
>


But that's what snowboarders do ;-^)


--
Tony

"The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
right."
- Lord Hailsham
 
On Mon, 07 Nov 2005 09:51:30 +0000, Matt B wrote:

> "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:p[email protected]...
>> As seen in the Times travel supplement on Saturday:
>>
>> http://www.baboongear.com/

>
> It's use though may well be considered irresponsible my many, as it will
> surely increase the propensity to behave recklessly, and with less respect
> for others.


Yes. When I were lad we had to make do with bin liners to slide on our
backsides down the hill.
Later I graduated to using poly survival bags (Peter C - is there ANY
other use for these things? I wouldn't care to spend the night in one).
Also have used those sit-mats given away in magazines for the purpose.

I guess giving the youth of today a built-in glissade pad in the **** of
their trousers will lead to carnage. Or some ripped trousers.
 
Tony Raven <[email protected]>typed


> Mark McNeill wrote:
> > Response to Stan Cox:
> >> I have unfortunately broken my coccyx and can
> >> say that its unbeleivably painful, still wouldnt be seen dead wearing
> >> that tho.

> >
> > According to the website, it can be worn next to the skin under your
> > shorts. You might have a bit of a VPL, though.
> >


> And, using the h****t arguments, its going to make you bum bigger and
> heavier which is not the world's best starting line for marketing ;-)


Yebbut do you think *that* little shield is big enough for *my* bum? ;-)

(Methinks there's sufficient padding there already...
.... I don't cycle anyway.)

--
Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
Edgware.
 
John Hearns wrote:

> Later I graduated to using poly survival bags (Peter C - is there ANY
> other use for these things?


Absolutely: they're very good as a protective cover for the back of your
car when sticking goop covered bikes inside, and as supplementary
groundsheets for tents on rough ground.

> I wouldn't care to spend the night in one).


God, no. I've known people who have, and they don't recommend it.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
Peter Clinch wrote:
> John Hearns wrote:
>
>> Later I graduated to using poly survival bags (Peter C - is there ANY
>> other use for these things?

>
> Absolutely: they're very good as a protective cover for the back of your
> car when sticking goop covered bikes inside, and as supplementary
> groundsheets for tents on rough ground.
>
>> I wouldn't care to spend the night in one).

>
> God, no. I've known people who have, and they don't recommend it.
>


I wouldn't recommend it either. If your companions are intent on it,
stick with the Captain Oates line of "I'm just going outside to find a
good hotel and may be some time" ;-)

--
Tony

"The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
right."
- Lord Hailsham
 
John Hearns wrote:
> Later I graduated to using poly survival bags (Peter C - is there ANY
> other use for these things? I wouldn't care to spend the night in
> one).

I am not Peter C but for years used one as an extra liner in a rucksac
(other people use/I used to use a fertiliser sack [much cheaper]) have
spent the night (by choice couldn't get into a youth hostel so decided
to "bivvy-up at the back of it) in one, got absolutely soaked (they do
not let sweat/water vapour out) would not recommend it and would not do
it again through choice. May well save your life though; mmm eight
hours with the wind kept off you (they are usually only about four foot
long so would not keep heavy rain off your top half) and some heat kept
in-V-walking off next day with wet kit, close one.
Would much rather find a cave/couple of rocks to use as shelter and
take my chances with the body heat the bag would conserve being lost,
maybe putting all the "spare" clothing I had, on.
--
This post contains no hidden meanings, no implications and certainly no
hidden agendas so it should be taken at face value. The wrong words
may be used this is due to my limitations with the English language .
 
got absolutely soaked (they do
> not let sweat/water vapour out) would not recommend it and would not do
> it again through choice. May well save your life though; mmm eight
> hours with the wind kept off you (they are usually only about four foot
> long so would not keep heavy rain off your top half) and some heat kept
> in-V-walking off next day with wet kit, close one.
> Would much rather find a cave/couple of rocks to use as shelter and
> take my chances with the body heat the bag would conserve being lost,
> maybe putting all the "spare" clothing I had, on.



As another unfortunate who has spent a night in a big orange poly bag I
would also not recommend it. Unfortunately as I was stuck halfway up a
mountain in the rain it was a choice between spending the whole night
wet and cold outside the bag or spending the night inside the bag
getting slowly colder and damper as the night went on and my sleeping
bag gradually soaked up the condensation..
This of course was back in the pre goretex days. A similiar night
now in a goretex bivvy bag would be fairly comfortable

Iain
 
Tony Raven wrote:

> Peter Clinch wrote:
>
>> John Hearns wrote:
>>
>>> Later I graduated to using poly survival bags (Peter C - is there ANY
>>> other use for these things?

>>
>>
>> Absolutely: they're very good as a protective cover for the back of
>> your car when sticking goop covered bikes inside, and as supplementary
>> groundsheets for tents on rough ground.
>>
>>> I wouldn't care to spend the night in one).

>>
>>
>> God, no. I've known people who have, and they don't recommend it.
>>

>
> I wouldn't recommend it either. If your companions are intent on it,
> stick with the Captain Oates line of "I'm just going outside to find a
> good hotel and may be some time" ;-)
>


I find the less I remember of it, the better it was ;-)

But heading up a hill with no tent may be worth it for the occasional
time that one can sleep outside the bag. Compared to a snow-hole in
February, none of my normal bivvying experiences can be considered truly
horrible.

James
--
James Annan
see web pages for email
http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
http://julesandjames.blogspot.com/
 
Response to Peter Clinch:
> > I wouldn't care to spend the night in one).

>
> God, no. I've known people who have, and they don't recommend it.


Summit of Snowdon, 1978. I think I've more or less warmed up by now.

--
Mark, UK

"One should as a rule respect public opinion in so far as is necessary to
avoid starvation and to keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond
this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny, and is likely to
interfere with happiness in all kinds of ways."
 
James Annan wrote:

> But heading up a hill with no tent may be worth it for the occasional
> time that one can sleep outside the bag.


Though if you can throw some money at the problem then something like a
Rab Survival Zone (~£60 IIRC) takes up less pack space than a big
poly-bag, very possibly weighs less and will be a whole lot more fun to
sleep in...

> Compared to a snow-hole in
> February, none of my normal bivvying experiences can be considered truly
> horrible.


Done a planned one in March in Norway, that wasn't horrible at all. But
"planned" makes a very big difference to comfort potential!

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
Peter Clinch wrote:
>
> James Annan wrote:
>
> > But heading up a hill with no tent may be worth it for the occasional
> > time that one can sleep outside the bag.

>
> Though if you can throw some money at the problem then something like a
> Rab Survival Zone (~£60 IIRC) takes up less pack space than a big
> poly-bag, very possibly weighs less and will be a whole lot more fun to
> sleep in...


I've got one of these and it's excellent. I've only used it outside once
but in Scotland it saves me the worry of my down bag getting wet even in
a tent or snow hole.

> > Compared to a snow-hole in
> > February, none of my normal bivvying experiences can be considered truly
> > horrible.

>
> Done a planned one in March in Norway, that wasn't horrible at all. But
> "planned" makes a very big difference to comfort potential!


I've found snow holes quite comfy, even unplanned ones (a mate managed
to loose a tent pole). This could be because when climbing in scotland I
tend to take a light weight shovel with me so have been able to dig big
enough holes.

James