Protein bars that taste terrible

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Jan 29, 2006.

  1. Hugh Beyer

    Hugh Beyer Guest

    "joanne" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1138601679.791463.52960
    @f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com:

    > Mug wrote:
    >> On Sun, 29 Jan 2006 21:36:01 -0500, Dally <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >I had to throw out my MetRX bars.

    >>
    >> ROTFLMFAO! Like this fat cow could/would ever part with food.

    >
    > Gee you must have her confused with your mother in that barn you grew
    > up in.
    > Dally is looking pretty svelt in those bike shorts these days ...
    >
    >
    > joanne
    >


    Lady. Troll. Move along, nothing to see here...

    Hugh


    --
    Exercise is a dirty word. Whenever I hear it, I wash my mouth out with
    chocolate. ("Ladi")
     


  2. Shaved Arse

    Shaved Arse Guest

    On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 03:40:02 GMT, Hugh Beyer <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Lady. Troll.


    A lady troll? That's relatively rare.


    >Move along, nothing to see here...


    I bet you look like that fat cop on South Park too.


    "You know what John Wayne would be doing right now if he was alive?

    Scratching at the roof of his coffin, most likely."
     
  3. DZ

    DZ Guest

    Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote:
    > DZ wrote:
    >> I don't think protein bars are Pavel-approved food. Why don't you
    >> butch up and chew on some dry beets.

    >
    > Borscht was often served during my growing up, and I always thought it
    > tasted terrible. I imagine dry beets to be even worse. In the land of
    > the Running Capitalist Dog, we have some choices, you know, and I intend
    > to make the most of them. :)


    I don't know why they put "t" in Borsch. There is no "t" in either
    Russian or Ukrainian spellings. But Borsch tastes quite good when
    properly made.

    They did serve restituted "salad" from previously dried beets during
    our military training, as well as "compote" made from dry fruit: a hot
    brown-colored drink with pieces of variety fruits in it. Yum.
     
  4. JMW

    JMW Guest

    DZ <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> DZ wrote:
    >>> I don't think protein bars are Pavel-approved food. Why don't you
    >>> butch up and chew on some dry beets.

    >>
    >> Borscht was often served during my growing up, and I always thought it
    >> tasted terrible. I imagine dry beets to be even worse. In the land of
    >> the Running Capitalist Dog, we have some choices, you know, and I intend
    >> to make the most of them. :)

    >
    >I don't know why they put "t" in Borsch. There is no "t" in either
    >Russian or Ukrainian spellings. But Borsch tastes quite good when
    >properly made.


    Actually, just the other day, I was thinking about asking if you had a
    decent recipe. When my mother was alive, she made some that was
    pretty tasty, but I haven't had it in years. I don't recall all the
    ingredients, but I remember that she grated the beets in the
    Cuisinart, and the texture was nice. I also recall that it was good
    with a large dollop of sour cream.
     
  5. Dally

    Dally Guest

    JMW wrote:
    > DZ <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>But Borsch tastes quite good when
    >>properly made.

    >
    >
    > Actually, just the other day, I was thinking about asking if you had a
    > decent recipe. When my mother was alive, she made some that was
    > pretty tasty, but I haven't had it in years.


    Am I allowed to make fun of muscleheads swapping soup recipes? Just a
    teeny bit?

    > I also recall that it was good
    > with a large dollop of sour cream.


    IME nearly everything is good with a large dollop of sour cream. I have
    found that the Greek Yogurt they sell at Trader Joe's is a good
    substitute for it, though. Certainly higher in protein.

    Dally
     
  6. JMW

    JMW Guest

    Dally <[email protected]> wrote:
    >JMW wrote:
    >> DZ <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>But Borsch tastes quite good when
    >>>properly made.

    >>
    >>
    >> Actually, just the other day, I was thinking about asking if you had a
    >> decent recipe. When my mother was alive, she made some that was
    >> pretty tasty, but I haven't had it in years.

    >
    >Am I allowed to make fun of muscleheads swapping soup recipes? Just a
    >teeny bit?
    >
    >> I also recall that it was good
    >> with a large dollop of sour cream.

    >
    >IME nearly everything is good with a large dollop of sour cream. I have
    >found that the Greek Yogurt they sell at Trader Joe's is a good
    >substitute for it, though. Certainly higher in protein.


    Whether the yogurt is Greek or not is irrelevant. The milkfat level
    is relevant. Nonfat yogurt is a tolerable substitute for sour cream,
    but it by no means replaces it.
     
  7. DZ

    DZ Guest

    Dally <[email protected]> wrote:
    > JMW wrote:
    >> DZ wrote:
    >>
    >>>But Borsch tastes quite good when properly made.

    >>
    >> Actually, just the other day, I was thinking about asking if you had a
    >> decent recipe. When my mother was alive, she made some that was
    >> pretty tasty, but I haven't had it in years.

    >
    > Am I allowed to make fun of muscleheads swapping soup recipes? Just a
    > teeny bit?
    >
    >> I also recall that it was good with a large dollop of sour cream.

    >
    > IME nearly everything is good with a large dollop of sour cream. I have
    > found that the Greek Yogurt they sell at Trader Joe's is a good
    > substitute for it, though. Certainly higher in protein.


    It's got to be sour cream. I'll track down a good recipe. I have a
    friend who lives in the Russian Far East but he's originally from here
    - (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krasnodar_Krai). Borsch really is his
    specialty. He stayed at my house in the US and we were inviting people
    to eat that stuff. He can speak with some heavy Southern-Russian
    accent with lots of Ukrainian words in it. It's even funnier than the
    Southern US accent.
     
  8. JMW

    JMW Guest

    DZ <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Dally <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> JMW wrote:
    >>> DZ wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>But Borsch tastes quite good when properly made.
    >>>
    >>> Actually, just the other day, I was thinking about asking if you had a
    >>> decent recipe. When my mother was alive, she made some that was
    >>> pretty tasty, but I haven't had it in years.

    >>
    >> Am I allowed to make fun of muscleheads swapping soup recipes? Just a
    >> teeny bit?
    >>
    >>> I also recall that it was good with a large dollop of sour cream.

    >>
    >> IME nearly everything is good with a large dollop of sour cream. I have
    >> found that the Greek Yogurt they sell at Trader Joe's is a good
    >> substitute for it, though. Certainly higher in protein.

    >
    >It's got to be sour cream. I'll track down a good recipe. I have a
    >friend who lives in the Russian Far East but he's originally from here
    >- (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krasnodar_Krai). Borsch really is his
    >specialty. He stayed at my house in the US and we were inviting people
    >to eat that stuff. He can speak with some heavy Southern-Russian
    >accent with lots of Ukrainian words in it. It's even funnier than the
    >Southern US accent.


    Russian hillbilly?
     
  9. Dally

    Dally Guest

    JMW wrote:
    > Dally <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>IME nearly everything is good with a large dollop of sour cream. I have
    >>found that the Greek Yogurt they sell at Trader Joe's is a good
    >>substitute for it, though. Certainly higher in protein.

    >
    > Whether the yogurt is Greek or not is irrelevant. The milkfat level
    > is relevant. Nonfat yogurt is a tolerable substitute for sour cream,
    > but it by no means replaces it.


    Don't knock it until you try it. The greek yogurt really is different,
    more tangy.

    Dally
     
  10. JMW

    JMW Guest

    Dally <[email protected]> wrote:

    >JMW wrote:
    >> Dally <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>IME nearly everything is good with a large dollop of sour cream. I have
    >>>found that the Greek Yogurt they sell at Trader Joe's is a good
    >>>substitute for it, though. Certainly higher in protein.

    >>
    >> Whether the yogurt is Greek or not is irrelevant. The milkfat level
    >> is relevant. Nonfat yogurt is a tolerable substitute for sour cream,
    >> but it by no means replaces it.

    >
    >Don't knock it until you try it. The greek yogurt really is different,
    >more tangy.


    Even generic yogurt is more "tangy" than sour cream. That's not what
    makes sour cream yummy.
     
  11. "DZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> DZ wrote:
    >>> I don't think protein bars are Pavel-approved food. Why don't you
    >>> butch up and chew on some dry beets.

    >>
    >> Borscht was often served during my growing up, and I always thought
    >> it
    >> tasted terrible. I imagine dry beets to be even worse. In the land
    >> of
    >> the Running Capitalist Dog, we have some choices, you know, and I
    >> intend
    >> to make the most of them. :)

    >
    > I don't know why they put "t" in Borsch. There is no "t" in either
    > Russian or Ukrainian spellings.


    Seems to work both ways in English - try Googling Borscht and you'll get
    plenty of hits.

    > But Borsch tastes quite good when
    > properly made.


    I will fault my mother, then.

    > They did serve restituted "salad" from previously dried beets during
    > our military training, as well as "compote" made from dry fruit: a hot
    > brown-colored drink with pieces of variety fruits in it. Yum.


    Restituted is a new word in English for me - I would have said
    "reconstituted." I'm not suggesting my choice is better than yours -
    from a reading of the dictionary, either seems OK to me.

    -S-
    http://www.kbnj.com
     
  12. DZ

    DZ Guest

    Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "DZ" wrote:
    >> Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> DZ wrote:
    >>>> I don't think protein bars are Pavel-approved food. Why don't you
    >>>> butch up and chew on some dry beets.
    >>>
    >>> Borscht was often served during my growing up, and I always
    >>> thought it tasted terrible. I imagine dry beets to be even worse.
    >>> In the land of the Running Capitalist Dog, we have some choices,
    >>> you know, and I intend to make the most of them. :)

    >>
    >> I don't know why they put "t" in Borsch. There is no "t" in either
    >> Russian or Ukrainian spellings.

    >
    > Seems to work both ways in English - try Googling Borscht and you'll get
    > plenty of hits.


    Right. I just thought the word is a transliteration from Russian and
    Ukrainian. The word means "beet" in some Southern Russian dialect.

    >> But Borsch tastes quite good when properly made.

    >
    > I will fault my mother, then.


    Did she come from Eastern Europe?
     
  13. DZ

    DZ Guest

    JMW <[email protected]> wrote:
    > DZ wrote:
    >>It's got to be sour cream. I'll track down a good recipe. I have a
    >>friend who lives in the Russian Far East but he's originally from here
    >>- (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krasnodar_Krai). Borsch really is his
    >>specialty. He stayed at my house in the US and we were inviting people
    >>to eat that stuff. He can speak with some heavy Southern-Russian
    >>accent with lots of Ukrainian words in it. It's even funnier than the
    >>Southern US accent.

    >
    > Russian hillbilly?


    Well, THEY don't think so! But he told me that when he started his
    career in genetics he was advised by people who meant well to work on
    his word usage and pronunciation (he's some 20 years older than me).
    Also, some Ukrainians think that they are the pure Slavic material and
    that Russians are a herd of mongrels with up to 25% Asian makeup
    because of the past genetic flow from the Mongol Empire. That suits me
    well though. A Russian poet Alexander Blok embraced it: "Yes, we are
    Asians - with slanted avid eyes!".
     
  14. JMW

    JMW Guest

    DZ <[email protected]> wrote:

    >JMW <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> DZ wrote:
    >>>It's got to be sour cream. I'll track down a good recipe. I have a
    >>>friend who lives in the Russian Far East but he's originally from here
    >>>- (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krasnodar_Krai). Borsch really is his
    >>>specialty. He stayed at my house in the US and we were inviting people
    >>>to eat that stuff. He can speak with some heavy Southern-Russian
    >>>accent with lots of Ukrainian words in it. It's even funnier than the
    >>>Southern US accent.

    >>
    >> Russian hillbilly?

    >
    >Well, THEY don't think so! But he told me that when he started his
    >career in genetics he was advised by people who meant well to work on
    >his word usage and pronunciation (he's some 20 years older than me).
    >Also, some Ukrainians think that they are the pure Slavic material ...


    You say that as if it's a good thing ... ;)
     
  15. "DZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> "DZ" wrote:
    >>> Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>> DZ wrote:
    >>>>> I don't think protein bars are Pavel-approved food. Why don't you
    >>>>> butch up and chew on some dry beets.
    >>>>
    >>>> Borscht was often served during my growing up, and I always
    >>>> thought it tasted terrible. I imagine dry beets to be even worse.
    >>>> In the land of the Running Capitalist Dog, we have some choices,
    >>>> you know, and I intend to make the most of them. :)
    >>>
    >>> I don't know why they put "t" in Borsch. There is no "t" in either
    >>> Russian or Ukrainian spellings.

    >>
    >> Seems to work both ways in English - try Googling Borscht and you'll
    >> get
    >> plenty of hits.

    >
    > Right. I just thought the word is a transliteration from Russian and
    > Ukrainian. The word means "beet" in some Southern Russian dialect.


    Probably a botched transliteration that stuck and nothing more than
    that, although perhaps it has the "t" in some other language/dialect ...

    >>> But Borsch tastes quite good when properly made.

    >>
    >> I will fault my mother, then.

    >
    > Did she come from Eastern Europe?


    Both parents trace their roots to Eastern Europe and Russia. We had a
    funny "incident" here when my father first met my next-door neighbors -
    the neighbors are both from Romania, and apparently although Yiddish was
    the main language spoken at home when my father was a child, some
    Romanian was spoken as well. My father introduced himself to the next
    door neighbors by saying "shut up" in Romanian, since that was what he
    remembered his mother always saying to him. Needless to say the
    neighbors were a bit surprised to be told to shut up by my father, who
    they'd just met, and equally needless to say, I hope, he rather quickly
    explained himself.

    BTW, did pullup "ladders" on Wednesday with a couple of guys at the gym.
    Two ladders up to 5, so that's 30 total reps, quite a lot of pullups for
    me in one day. I did mine with a 30 lb. dumbbell held between my feet
    and did a hanging leg raise w/ the dumbbell, pulling my thighs up to 90
    degrees on each rep. My training partners used lighter weights, ~10
    lbs., and dropped the weight for some of the later reps. Nice way to
    get in some volume.

    -S-
    http://www.kbnj.com
     
  16. Razor Ramon

    Razor Ramon Guest

    "DZ" <> Did she come from Eastern Europe?>

    No she came from a good fudging that I gave her. took the entire yam up her
    bung, and then she shit cream pies.
     
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