Protein Powder?

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by mcgr, Aug 12, 2007.

  1. mcgr

    mcgr New Member

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    I am 17 years old and just about to purchase my first road bike. I have done mountain biking occasionally a few years ago. I want to go riding 5-6 times per week for 1-3 hours per day. I am also going to join a cycling club. I will train between 5-7 o'clock in the morning. Would protein powder be benificial to my training? I am aiming to become a very strong rider and enter competitions in about a year.

    Thanks
     
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  2. nath1

    nath1 New Member

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    Hi that all depends, there is certainly now harm in a protein shake but I find that pasta and a couple of pouched eggs are just as good for a post ride recovery meal. However, I do on occasion use protein shakes when I am in rush so they are good in that sense. Just try not to believe all the bull that they say on the tubs about HUGE power increases. At the end of the day it is just a source of protein that can be found in food. Sounds a bit 'old school' but I have tried them all( supplements that is). Another draw back is that they are so expensive certainly if you go for a more refined product which could be better spent on food. I would at least try some to make up your own mind. I have found the best range from EAS , I sometimes use their 'race recovery'. It is very similar to other products but the main thing is that it does not taste like crap, in fact it is rather more'ish, lol especialy the chocolate flavour. Saying all this some people will swear by the use of supplements. See how you go, if you struggle to recover from workouts even with a good diet,then why not, you wont lose anything but a few dollers. lol. good luck nath.
     
  3. R400

    R400 New Member

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    I agree with nath1; proper nutrition is far more beneficial.

    Though I too have just recently started cycling, I have been into various forms of very demanding exercise for many years--running, weight lifting, kick boxing, jiu jitsu...etc--so I understand the benefits, as well as the negative effects of protein. Basically, in my experience, one serving of a quality protein is beneficial after an intense workout. Quality protein often contains a good amount of branch chain amino acids, as well as glutamine. In my experience, these supplements do contribute to a fast recovery.

    With that said, I caution you to NOT drink too much protein. Excessive amounts of protein is good for body builders, but they can't even scratch their back let alone pedal with the best of them. It's simple really, if you drink a ridiculous amount of protein, you'll develop a ridiculous amount of "stupid muscle." Conversely, taking a shake or two per day has its benefits--again, in my experience.

    I've researched--and more importantly tried--various proteins and other supplements for the last few years. In the end, this is the protein I use: http://bodybuilding.com/store/dym/elite.html

    It's ultra high quality (basically the same as Isopure, but at a fraction of the price) and tastes awesome!

    Stay away from refined flour--white bread, white pasta, white bagel..etc. Eat whole grain bread, pasta, bagel...etc. Makes a big difference.

    Good luck. Go eat! :D
     
  4. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    Presuming you eat a normal mixed diet (including vegetarian), and don't eat a bizarre diet (e.g., you just drink energy drinks), and aren't in a heavy weight loss phase, then it's highly unlikely that you'd need supplemental protein. Unless you like wasting money.

    Ric
     
  5. Luffers

    Luffers New Member

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    No truth to that at all.
     
  6. mongooseboy

    mongooseboy New Member

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    a few times a week i drink a two-scoop protein shake for breakfast, instead of eating. why? well I only do it on days i know i wont be on the bike, and I know my diet really lacks protein (and probably vitamins...) for my bike rebuilding. Plus, im trying to loose a bit of weight, and the protein shake keeps me full for hours, unlike cereal or anything like that. In winter, ill eat mostly oatmeal for breakfast, as it fills me up very well, and doesnt have a lot of calories really.

    at 17, i DOUBT you need any extra protien for cycling. weight lifting, sure, cycling I doubt it unless you are competative. Like I said, im a bit overweight and im mixing with skim milk to cut carbs and fat. You would be better off having an extra chicken breast, or small steak, maybe even some pinto beans and rice? for me its a meal replacement...
     
  7. stevetroyer

    stevetroyer New Member

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    I have found several products that have helped me in my cycling that may be of interest to you. I have started using these last year and have seen my performance increase remarkably this year.

    Major league baseball, professional football, many teams with the NBA and professional hockey are using these products. They are NSF certified as aproved for sports. They are all natural and come with a money back guarantee. If they don't help you, you get your money back!

    They have an energy drink that has helped me outperform people in their twenties...I'm 52.

    I could not resist the offer and I never did ask for my money back. These nutrional products do work.

    If you would like more information, you can contatct me at [email protected]
     
  8. Maltese

    Maltese New Member

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    If you are exercising to strenghten you muscles then yes Protein supplements will help. Proteins are needed to help your muscles to recover and grow after exercising. Considering that you are trying to stay lean and not really trying to build huge muscles I would go with a protein that is low in sugar and fat. The one I use is http://www.illpumpyouup.com/bsn/syntha-6.htm, it has 46 grams of protien per serving with only 4 grams of sugar.... plus the taste is awesome...:)
     
  9. fstrdr7

    fstrdr7 New Member

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    your body can only handle so much protein, so after a certain amount, the rest just turns to waste product. But it is good to make sure you are getting enough. After a hard workout or ride i usually have a protein shake or a tall glass of chocolate milk. I have tried lots of protein supplements, by far and away as far as taste and price and mixability is Optimum 100% Whey Protein. It also includes glutamine to improve recovery time and boost your immune system. You can definitely get the protein you need from a well balanced diet, but I like to have a shake every once in a while as well, it is just easy.

    http://bodybuilding.com/store/opt/whey.html
     
  10. Fudge Monkey

    Fudge Monkey New Member

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    What he said.

    Protein is only part of the equation - just like fats.
    Complex carbs and H2O should be at the top of your list.
     
  11. BernardM

    BernardM New Member

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    Supplements that dramatically increase your athletic performance??? Like what?? How about sharing your special secret?? :D

     
  12. root

    root New Member

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    You don't need protein supplements. Not even if you are a body builder, let alone a cyclist. The beauty of cycling is that you can eat healthy and balanced diet and perform well, unlike say body building where you do need to eat more protein than what would be considered balanced.

    Most normal diets contain more than enough protein, so unless you eat weirdly or are strict vegetarian (where it is difficult to get all essential amino acids), you already get plenty.
     
  13. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    This is untrue in elite cyclists, riding events such as a Grand Tour. That is, the need for protein is highest in these cycling events compared to any other sporting event. However, even these rates of protein can be supplied by a normal, mixed diet. In other words, for GTs the carbohydrate and protein requirement, per kg of body mass needed is higher than for body building.

    Even in a strict vegetarian diet it's not difficult to meet the sporting protein requirements. For e.g., i'm a strict vegetarian, and when i last did a dietary assessment, my protein intake would have been sufficient for riding a GT. It's not difficult to reach such high intakes (unless you eat a 'bizarre' diet).

    ric
     
  14. Fudge Monkey

    Fudge Monkey New Member

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    An athlete requires .3 grams of protein per LEAN body mass. Anything more overloads your kidneys to metabolise your expensive protein concentrate so you can pee it down the toilet.

    This summer i weighed 169lbs at 6.9% BF.

    This means i needed about 47grams of protein daily - the equivalent of 2 handfulls of almonds.

    Protein is misleadingly promoted by the supplement industry because there is so much money to be made. There is no money in selling fruit or tap water.

    For example if i was protein deficient by 10% i couldn't honestly measure any a decrease in performance. Of course i'm not a TDF athlete, but a serious one none the less.

    I hope you don't buy into this BS protein gimmick.
     
  15. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    While i don't believe that you need protein supplements, the rest of your post is incorrect. For e.g., most endurance athletes (e.g. up to ~15 hrs/week training) will require around 1.5 g of protein per kg of body mass. For evidence see, ACSM position stand.

    Ric
     
  16. jackson123

    jackson123 New Member

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    you need 47grams of protein daily? how does it work out
     
  17. root

    root New Member

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    It is easy to get x grams of protein. You can do it from bread alone. However, not all protein is the same, and it is not easy to get all essential amino acids from vegetable sources. Luckily most vegetarians are more interested in nutrition in general, and are aware of this and know what they need to eat.

    Same goes for vitamin B, which is not well absorbed from vegetable sources. Hence, strict vegetarians should probably get B12 injection once a year, just to be safe.
     
  18. Fudge Monkey

    Fudge Monkey New Member

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    Never heard of it, but i'll google it and let you know what i think.

    The evidence i read chronicled subjects who secreted excess protein from mimimal intake.. of course when discussing the protein paradox, ask any 2 people and you'll get 4 different answers.


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