Protest rallies a huge success



Your blog has made it clear that you don't like high racers, the
Bacchetta Company, and it's owners? So what do you ride and why do
like it?

Jim Reilly
Reading, PA
 
S

Sunset Lowracer [TM] Fanatic

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Your blog has made it clear that you don't like high racers, the
> Bacchetta Company, and it's owners? So what do you ride and why do
> like it?


The HRS blog has had positive comments about Volae (relative to other
highracers), Trek upright road bikes, the Velokraft NoCom, the Optima
Baron and the ReBike.

--
Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
 
I was hoping to hear a response from Mojo directly but I suppose an
indirect response from the political arm of the Mojo Republican Army
will have to do.

Jim
 
S

Sunset Lowracer [TM] Fanatic

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> I was hoping to hear a response from Mojo directly but I suppose an
> indirect response from the political arm of the Mojo Republican Army
> will have to do.


If this were the case, I should be getting a free Velokraft NoCom as
payment for my services.

--
Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
 
Maybe you will. Chirstmas is coming. All joking aside, the NoCom
looks amazing! Still the position of the rider's legs as well as the
chain has me wondering how far one could turn the front wheel before
hitting one or the other. What do you know about that?

Jim, still near Reading, PA
 
M

Mark Leuck

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Maybe you will. Chirstmas is coming. All joking aside, the NoCom
> looks amazing! Still the position of the rider's legs as well as the
> chain has me wondering how far one could turn the front wheel before
> hitting one or the other. What do you know about that?
>
> Jim, still near Reading, PA


I rode one a month ago, forget about turning the front wheel more than a few
degrees. The NoCom is a nice looking but impractical bike, I'll stick with
my Baron
 
S

Sunset Lowracer [TM] Fanatic

Guest
Jim Reilly who is still near Reading, PA ([email protected]) wrote:
> Maybe you will. Chirstmas is coming. All joking aside, the NoCom
> looks amazing! Still the position of the rider's legs as well as the
> chain has me wondering how far one could turn the front wheel before
> hitting one or the other. What do you know about that?


I have ridden a couple of lowracers that run the chain by the front
wheel (this is an option on the Earth Cycles Sunset Lowracer [TM]).
Useable steering "lock" is rather limited in this arrangement. The two
situations where wheel/chain interference are generally an issue are
when starting out and when making tight turns. The former can be dealt
with by proper starting technique, i.e., have the bike vertical, in the
proper gear, and the crank/pedals in an orientation that allows the
rider to generate the largest possible force on the pedal. The later
can be addressed by riding in a vehicular manner; i.e. not attempting
any maneuvers that one would not do in a motor vehicle. Negotiating
certain bike paths with sharps turns could be a problem, but this is
not the ideal environment for a bicycle like the Velokraft NoCom [1]
which begs to be ridden at higher speeds. At the 20+ mph (35+ kph)
speeds easily obtained on the NoCom, limited steering lock will not be
an issue.

[1] Until proven otherwise, the Velokraft NoCom is the fastest "Stock
Class" bicycle in the known universe.

--
Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
 
S

Sunset Lowracer [TM] Fanatic

Guest
Mark Leuck wrote:
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > Maybe you will. Chirstmas is coming. All joking aside, the NoCom
> > looks amazing! Still the position of the rider's legs as well as the
> > chain has me wondering how far one could turn the front wheel before
> > hitting one or the other. What do you know about that?
> >
> > Jim, still near Reading, PA

>
> I rode one a month ago, forget about turning the front wheel more than a few
> degrees. The NoCom is a nice looking but impractical bike, I'll stick with
> my Baron[.]


Standard or "low" Baron? The large amount of tiller is very noticeable
on the stock Optima Baron setup, but it still handles quite well at
lower speeds.

--
Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
 
E

Edward Dolan

Guest
"Sunset Lowracer [TM] Fanatic" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> Jim Reilly who is still near Reading, PA ([email protected]) wrote:
>> Maybe you will. Chirstmas is coming. All joking aside, the NoCom
>> looks amazing! Still the position of the rider's legs as well as the
>> chain has me wondering how far one could turn the front wheel before
>> hitting one or the other. What do you know about that?

>
> I have ridden a couple of lowracers that run the chain by the front
> wheel (this is an option on the Earth Cycles Sunset Lowracer [TM]).
> Useable steering "lock" is rather limited in this arrangement. The two
> situations where wheel/chain interference are generally an issue are
> when starting out and when making tight turns. The former can be dealt
> with by proper starting technique, i.e., have the bike vertical, in the
> proper gear, and the crank/pedals in an orientation that allows the
> rider to generate the largest possible force on the pedal. The later
> can be addressed by riding in a vehicular manner; i.e. not attempting
> any maneuvers that one would not do in a motor vehicle. Negotiating
> certain bike paths with sharps turns could be a problem, but this is
> not the ideal environment for a bicycle like the Velokraft NoCom [1]
> which begs to be ridden at higher speeds. At the 20+ mph (35+ kph)
> speeds easily obtained on the NoCom, limited steering lock will not be
> an issue.


In other words, a good bike for ideal riding conditions. However, in the
real world there hardly ever exist ideal riding conditions, most especially
not in urban areas. No thank you! I want a bike I can ride easily and
handily under any and all conditions. This includes really bad roads, sharp
turns, totally congested conditions where going slow is mandatory, ... the
list just goes on and on.

Some bikes are designed more for the race track than real roads. Anyone here
into racing? I thought not!

Regards,

Ed Dolan - Minnesota

>
> [1] Until proven otherwise, the Velokraft NoCom is the fastest "Stock
> Class" bicycle in the known universe.
>
> --
> Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley


PS. Mr. Sherman could just as easily have put his footnote in parenthesis in
the body of his message, thereby sparing us the tedium of having to look for
it in the cellar. One of these days I am going to write a long essay and
post it here on ARBR on why none of us should ever use footnotes. It is
nothing but a scholarly affectation which has no place here. As a former
college librarian who had to deal with these confounded things all the time,
I HATE FOOTNOTES! Does Mr. Sherman do this just to irritate me?
 
M

Mark Leuck

Guest
"Sunset Lowracer [TM] Fanatic" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> Mark Leuck wrote:
> > <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]
> > > Maybe you will. Chirstmas is coming. All joking aside, the NoCom
> > > looks amazing! Still the position of the rider's legs as well as the
> > > chain has me wondering how far one could turn the front wheel before
> > > hitting one or the other. What do you know about that?
> > >
> > > Jim, still near Reading, PA

> >
> > I rode one a month ago, forget about turning the front wheel more than a

few
> > degrees. The NoCom is a nice looking but impractical bike, I'll stick

with
> > my Baron[.]

>
> Standard or "low" Baron? The large amount of tiller is very noticeable
> on the stock Optima Baron setup, but it still handles quite well at
> lower speeds.
>
> --
> Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley


Standard, I find the tiller not noticeable however I also don't think it
handles well at lower speeds
 
S

Sunset Lowracer [TM] Fanatic

Guest
Mark Leuck wrote:
>
> Standard [Optima Baron], I find the tiller not noticeable...


Try riding a bike with linkage steering or minimal tiller for
comparison purposes.

> however I also don't think it handles well at lower speeds[.]


Handling is relative - I have ridden some recumbents that I would not
want to ride in close proximity to other riders due to control issues
[1].

[1] The Optima Baron is not one of these [2].
[2] Gratuitous footnote for Ed Dolan.
--
Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
 
S

Sunset Lowracer [TM] Fanatic

Guest
Edward Dolan wrote:
> ...
> In other words, a good bike for ideal riding conditions. However, in the
> real world there hardly ever exist ideal riding conditions, most especially
> not in urban areas. No thank you! I want a bike I can ride easily and
> handily under any and all conditions. This includes really bad roads, sharp
> turns, totally congested conditions where going slow is mandatory, ... the
> list just goes on and on.


Reportedly, there is a practical lowracer out there if one is willing
to sacrifice some of the performance of the Velokraft NoCom [1]. This
practical lowracer is called the Earth Cycles Sunset Lowracer. However,
I understand that some Sunset owners post about their bikes with
excessive frequency on Internet forums.

[1] Fastest Unfaired Bike in the Known Universe.
--
Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
 
E

Edward Dolan

Guest
"Sunset Lowracer [TM] Fanatic" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> Mark Leuck wrote:
>>
>> Standard [Optima Baron], I find the tiller not noticeable...

>
> Try riding a bike with linkage steering or minimal tiller for
> comparison purposes.
>
>> however I also don't think it handles well at lower speeds[.]

>
> Handling is relative - I have ridden some recumbents that I would not
> want to ride in close proximity to other riders due to control issues
> [1].
>
> [1] The Optima Baron is not one of these [2].
> [2] Gratuitous footnote for Ed Dolan.
> --
> Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley


Yes! Yes! I knew all along that Mr. Sherman was posting his abominable
footnotes just to irritate me.

Scholars have persecuted me like forever with their abominable footnotes. As
much as I would like to ignore them, I find that I can't. I will follow a
footnote all the way to Hell and back. Many times in the past I have
actually spent much more time on footnotes than I ever did on the body of
the text. The general reader will not normally bother with footnotes, but my
training as a librarian has forever prevented me from enjoying that luxury.

I plead with Mr. Sherman to go easy on the footnotes. If he causes my early
demise from such shenanigans, I will have my estate bring suit against him
for harassment.

One other thing that bothers me out of all proportion to its true
significance is Mark Leuck's not putting periods at the end of his
sentences. I also know that he does this just to irritate me. I have
instructed him on this matter repeatedly, but he refuses to listen to my
sage counsel.

It is clear that my vast learning and wisdom are not appreciated here on
ARBR. I will have to dumb myself down in order to communicate better with
the denizens of ARBR.

Regards,

Ed Dolan - Minnesota
 

nget

New Member
Feb 24, 2004
332
0
0
Sunset Lowracer [TM] Fanatic said:
Jim Reilly who is still near Reading, PA ([email protected]) wrote:
> Maybe you will. Chirstmas is coming. All joking aside, the NoCom
> looks amazing! Still the position of the rider's legs as well as the
> chain has me wondering how far one could turn the front wheel before
> hitting one or the other. What do you know about that?


I have ridden a couple of lowracers that run the chain by the front
wheel (this is an option on the Earth Cycles Sunset Lowracer [TM]).
Useable steering "lock" is rather limited in this arrangement. The two
situations where wheel/chain interference are generally an issue are
when starting out and when making tight turns. The former can be dealt
with by proper starting technique, i.e., have the bike vertical, in the
proper gear, and the crank/pedals in an orientation that allows the
rider to generate the largest possible force on the pedal. The later
can be addressed by riding in a vehicular manner; i.e. not attempting
any maneuvers that one would not do in a motor vehicle. Negotiating
certain bike paths with sharps turns could be a problem, but this is
not the ideal environment for a bicycle like the Velokraft NoCom [1]
which begs to be ridden at higher speeds. At the 20+ mph (35+ kph)
speeds easily obtained on the NoCom, limited steering lock will not be
an issue.

[1] Until proven otherwise, the Velokraft NoCom is the fastest "Stock
Class" bicycle in the known universe.

--
Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley

And the question is,what recumbent team won its category for the 2005 Race across America?
Second question for Tom, your universe or the one the rest of us live in?
 
S

Sunset Lowracer [TM] Fanatic

Guest
nget who? wrote:
> ...
> And the question is,what recumbent team won its category for the 2005
> Race across America?...


Apples and oranges. Put calibrated power measuring cranks/BB on a
properly setup NoCom and any highracer and see which is faster under
identical power outputs and conditions. Enough said.

--
Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
Sunset Lowracer [TM] Fanatic wrote:

> Apples and oranges. Put calibrated power measuring cranks/BB on a
> properly setup NoCom and any highracer and see which is faster under
> identical power outputs and conditions. Enough said.


You can go for a suitably bumpy track where 26" or 700c wheels will have
significantly superior rolling characteristics to anything smaller. Of
course, some Real Roads fall into that category, so it's possible a Real
Race on Real Roads will not favour bespoke racing machinery like the NoCom.

My Streetmachine has left behind a carbon upright racer that is
/usually/ faster and has a fitter, better rider than me when we came
upon a really poor road and my suspension just soaked up all the warts
that the wedgie had to go up and down in each one's entirety. The NoCom
is named for no compromises to make it "practical" for "normal" riding,
but some of those compromises are genuinely useful on real roads,
especially when they're poor.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
M

Mojo

Guest
jrei,

On the contrary, HRS strives to provide the most up to date, accurate
investigative research for all types of HIGHBIKES, ***** Shidda,
Volae, Challenge, Flevo, etc.

Our commitment is to first and foremost, be the official source for
unbiased, truthful information.

You and the readership will ultimately decide what is pertinent for
your decisions.

Mojo - CEO
 
M

Mojo

Guest
Tom,

Word is, you were sorely missed at a famous Midwestern Recumbent Party
this weekend. Event organizers apparantly lost your emai address.

Trust me, your position regarding recent discussions on this forum
were one of the topics amongst the partygoer's.

Should you have come, perhaps a NoCom would have been farfetched but
I'll guarantee you plenty of good company, food, and spirits.

BTW, would you please send me your current email address at our
customer service division? [email protected]

Mojo - CEO
 

nget

New Member
Feb 24, 2004
332
0
0
Sunset Lowracer [TM] Fanatic said:
nget who? wrote:
> ...
> And the question is,what recumbent team won its category for the 2005
> Race across America?...


Apples and oranges. Put calibrated power measuring cranks/BB on a
properly setup NoCom and any highracer and see which is faster under
identical power outputs and conditions. Enough said.

--
Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
Is this true, a no com with power assist? You'll never get away with that at any race I know of.
 

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