Pump Gauge Gone Berzerk



N

NY Rides

Guest
I need to revisit this question, as I'm sure there are some more responses
out there.

Out of nowhere, the pressure gauge on my Lemond floor pump jumped up to the
maximum reading and froze there. I took it apart and reset it at zero. Now
it won't register beyond 40 psi.

Any ideas for repairing or replacing the gauge only, as I'd like to keep the
pump?
 
F

Friday

Guest
NY Rides wrote:
> I need to revisit this question, as I'm sure there are some more responses
> out there.
>
> Out of nowhere, the pressure gauge on my Lemond floor pump jumped up to the
> maximum reading and froze there. I took it apart and reset it at zero. Now
> it won't register beyond 40 psi.
>
> Any ideas for repairing or replacing the gauge only, as I'd like to keep the
> pump?
>
>



To fix a zero error you pull the pointer off and put it back on at zero,
or set it with a known pressure. If you open the gauge and look at the
mechanism they usually have a rack and pinion setup driving the pointer.
If the teeth are worn then you need to throw the gauge away and get a
new one. If the curved tube inside the gauge is creased you should throw
the gauge away also, but that's pretty rare and usually only happens
when the gauge has been severely over-pressurised. A worn mechanisim
usually causes a "sticky" gauge.

Friday
 
N

NY Rides

Guest
>>>>...A worn mechanisim usually causes a "sticky" gauge.<<<<<

So, are these easily replaceable? Somebody else sent me to a website that
had some gauges for sale, but there was no indication that any would fit in
the slot on my pump.

"Friday" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> NY Rides wrote:
>> I need to revisit this question, as I'm sure there are some more
>> responses out there.
>>
>> Out of nowhere, the pressure gauge on my Lemond floor pump jumped up to
>> the maximum reading and froze there. I took it apart and reset it at
>> zero. Now it won't register beyond 40 psi.
>>
>> Any ideas for repairing or replacing the gauge only, as I'd like to keep
>> the pump?

>
>
> To fix a zero error you pull the pointer off and put it back on at zero,
> or set it with a known pressure. If you open the gauge and look at the
> mechanism they usually have a rack and pinion setup driving the pointer.
> If the teeth are worn then you need to throw the gauge away and get a new
> one. If the curved tube inside the gauge is creased you should throw the
> gauge away also, but that's pretty rare and usually only happens when the
> gauge has been severely over-pressurised. A worn mechanisim usually causes
> a "sticky" gauge.
>
> Friday
 
Small offsets in dial position can be corrected by adjusting needle
position but larger ones mean the gauge is shot and non-linear. Learn
to free the Presta valve before pumping. I've had several gauges
ruined by riders who used my pump and either tried to inflate their
tire without opening the nut on the Presta valve or just loosening it
and not breaking the valve free. Both methods result in a stretched
Bourdon tube in the gauge.

Jobst Brandt
 
F

Friday

Guest
NY Rides wrote:
>>>>>...A worn mechanisim usually causes a "sticky" gauge.<<<<<

>
>
> So, are these easily replaceable? Somebody else sent me to a website that
> had some gauges for sale, but there was no indication that any would fit in
> the slot on my pump.


Small pressure gauges, one or two inches in diameter, with a maximum
pressure of 140 PSI are very common because the industry standard for
pneumatic control is 3 to 15 PSI and the regulators for the supply air
normally have a gauge of around 140 PSI on the supply side. Pnematic
control valves, air pressure regulators and pnematic controllers nearly
always have one of these gauges on them. Contact someone that works in
industrial control and instrumentation. Nearly any big industry that
works with liquids such as steam, oil or water will use control valves.

Friday

>
> "Friday" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>>NY Rides wrote:
>>
>>>I need to revisit this question, as I'm sure there are some more
>>>responses out there.
>>>
>>>Out of nowhere, the pressure gauge on my Lemond floor pump jumped up to
>>>the maximum reading and froze there. I took it apart and reset it at
>>>zero. Now it won't register beyond 40 psi.
>>>
>>>Any ideas for repairing or replacing the gauge only, as I'd like to keep
>>>the pump?

>>
>>
>>To fix a zero error you pull the pointer off and put it back on at zero,
>>or set it with a known pressure. If you open the gauge and look at the
>>mechanism they usually have a rack and pinion setup driving the pointer.
>>If the teeth are worn then you need to throw the gauge away and get a new
>>one. If the curved tube inside the gauge is creased you should throw the
>>gauge away also, but that's pretty rare and usually only happens when the
>>gauge has been severely over-pressurised. A worn mechanisim usually causes
>>a "sticky" gauge.
>>
>>Friday

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