Puncture Proof Tires

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by kana_marie, May 2, 2015.

  1. kana_marie

    kana_marie Member

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    Is it worth the money to buy the puncture proof tires? I rarely get a flat tire, but when I do it's a REALLY big hassle.
     
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  2. mpre53

    mpre53 Well-Known Member

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    Think of those tires as "puncture resistant". Ain't no such thing as puncture proof. Or, at least, nothing that you'd want to ride on. Solid rubber.

    If you rarely flat, I'd say no real reason to spend more. You'll be buying new tires eventually so wait until then.
     
  3. MotownBikeBoy

    MotownBikeBoy Active Member

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    Do you change a flat yourself? Do you carry tools and supplies to fix a flat on the road? Asking because you said a flat is a really big hassle - but with the right knowledge and supplies/tools it's actually pretty simple.

    I've graduated from "walk the bike home 5 miles". all the way to "MacGyver it with a dollar bill and electrical tape". You can too - flats are no big deal
     
  4. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    There are tires that don't get flats so easy...

    There are also some tubes that apparently don't get flat so easy.

    If you are running your tires at lower pressures, maybe you can just get a can of sealant and spray your tubes with it from the inside. Even if you get a flat it will probably decrease the deflation rate and you could make it home. Overnight the tires might become flat but at least you will be at home and it will be easier to change the tire. Easier then changing it with a CO2 catridge in the rain 5 km away from home at least. :angry: Damn rain debris...

    20euro flats suck! :D 3 euro for the tube, 3 euro for the new tube, 3 euro for a CO2 catridge. New tube gets blown from CO2 inflation. 6 euro taxi ride home. 6 euro for 2 more tubes... :D

    You could also carry a patch kit. ;)


    What kind of tires are you using? Mountain bike? Road?
     
  5. gavinfree

    gavinfree Member

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    I'd say it's a better idea to get some quality regular tires. You don't need to spend that extra money, and chances are good that you'd still puncture supposedly puncture-proof tires. I know it can be a hassle to repair flats or replace flattened tires, but you'll save money long-term and see roughly the same results anyways.
     
  6. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    Flats are common with road bike tires, but can be changed quickly and relatively cheaply. You can spend around $20 fixing a flat, but it does not need to be that way.

    A road bike flat cost me less than $1 to repair. I purchase CO2 cartridges on clearance online and patch my tubes at home. I typically carry 1 new tube and one patched tube as spares on a ride and a rarely ever have to touch the new tube.

    If you are riding casually or commuting, performance oriented, thin road tires may not be the best choice. Thicker touring tires are much more flat resistant. I have yet to get a flat on my Vittoria Randonneur tires and I ride them in the worst conditions on my winter and rain beater. These tires are still plenty fast enough for commuting or an occasional B group ride.
     
  7. joshposh

    joshposh Banned

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    Back in Hawaii you would actually carry a can of fix a flat and spray it into the tire and it will seal it and inflate your tire. That will get you back home to get a proper repair.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. StrawberryCat

    StrawberryCat New Member

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    In my opinion, I would say no. You can still get quality tires without needing to get puncture proof ties. Also, you'll need to change the tires at some point anyway either due to a flat or wear and tear. Puncture proof tires can still be punctured and get a flat anyway.
     
  9. adfnio

    adfnio New Member

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    There are several new tires for motocyles and cars that have just come out that are puncture proof. I do not think that they are availble for bicycle tires just yet.
     
  10. Grimp

    Grimp New Member

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    Puncture proof tires? Sign me up, Seriously though, I need some advice on where to buy some new mountain bike tires, tires that will last me for a long time, sorry this is in the road bike section but I'm sure you guys know about MTB aswel?
     
  11. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    I know "of" them... :D

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wx2e9jSSK6E
     
  12. Jojo83

    Jojo83 New Member

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    If there are puncture proof tires that really exists, then that would be great. But, bike tires rarely get punctured anyway in my years of experience cycling through all types of terrain and distances. I think it's good to be able to repair a punctured tire with a vulcanizing kit once in a while... It's kind of fun.
     
  13. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    There is no such thing as puncture proof tires. You can go a long ways in preventing flats but you could still get one. If flats darn right bother you then I would buy a pair of Specialized Armadillo All Condition tires, then buy a pair of Panaracer FlatAway liner (this liner is far superior to the often mentioned Mr Tuffy), then just buy a standard tube (no thorn resistant tube and no tube with gunk in it, and don't bother with the flat gunk crap in a can.

    Having said all of that you need to practice, practice, practice, and practice at fixing flats so you're not so bothered by the event. I can fix a front a flat in under 5 minutes and a rear in less than 10 if I'm motivated. I've had a lot of practice though having done it for 40 plus years, plus some of that time living in the Mojave Desert of Calif where goatheads went through tires like butter and averaged 2 flats a day...until I got the Armadillo tires then I went to 1 flat in 5 years!!

    A flat isn't all that complicated to do, in fact it's the least complicated mechanical repair on a bike. Some people like to swap tubes out at flat time and fix the flatted tube when they get home, I instead always fix the flatted tube on the road because I can usually find the hole and object within a minute, and have the tube patched as fast as I can replace it then I don't have to waste time at home fixing a tube. I do carry a spare tube just in case for some reason I can't find the hole or it's raining.

    My method of fixing flats is bit unorthodox, but I've done this way for years. Usually all I have to do once I find the hole and offending object is to leave the wheel on the bike! then remove about 1/2 of one side of the tire with the hole in the center of the half, then pull out about 1/4 of the tube with the hole again in the center of that. Pick out the object in the tire if there is one, buff the tube, apply a Specialized Fatboy or a Park Glueless patch and press hard for 30 seconds, check patch for any frosty areas and repress those areas, reinstall the tube and tire. Only time I ever remove the wheel from the bike is if I can't get the object out of the tire due to space constraints, or I have to replace the tube. The time it takes me to fix a flat I gave in my first paragraph is if I have to remove the wheel! Also those times do not include the time it takes to pump the tire up and put back the tools and pump.
     
  14. Corzhens

    Corzhens Well-Known Member

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    I have heard of puncture-resistant tires for the bike. But what I am interested in is the flat-resistant tire for vehicles particularly for our car. Don't laugh, I am serious on this. There was this demo of Michelin, an air-less tire that cannot go flat since it has no inner tube. That was so many years ago and until now I haven't heard of it.
     
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