Puncture repairs failing

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Doki, Jun 15, 2004.

  1. Doki

    Doki Guest

    I've had a couple of punctures that I've repaired leak again. The patch
    bubbles up above the hole and eventually gives up. I've used bog standard
    cheapo puncture repair kit gear, and done all the usual sanding, lots of
    time for the glue to dry things. Any ideas?
     
    Tags:


  2. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Doki wrote:
    > I've had a couple of punctures that I've repaired leak again. The patch
    > bubbles up above the hole and eventually gives up. I've used bog standard
    > cheapo puncture repair kit gear, and done all the usual sanding, lots of
    > time for the glue to dry things. Any ideas?


    Maybe you're using the rubber/vulcanising solution as "glue" rather than
    as the primary repair?

    After you put on the goop it should be just on the final verges of
    tackiness before you actually put the patch on, so the solution over the
    hole itself should be pretty much dry before the patch is in place.

    I've been tempted to use the solution as glue in the past, but it really
    doesn't work that well! If you are letting the solution almost dry
    before adding the patch maybe your cheapo kit has cheapo vulcanising
    solution or you have inner tubes made from tubular cheese, but I've yet
    to find any that don't work if I let it dry to just about tacky /before/
    the patch goes on.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  3. Doki wrote:

    > I've had a couple of punctures that I've repaired leak again. The
    > patch bubbles up above the hole and eventually gives up. I've used
    > bog standard cheapo puncture repair kit gear, and done all the usual
    > sanding, lots of time for the glue to dry things. Any ideas?


    Replace your puncture kit with Rema Tip-Top.

    --
    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk
     
  4. "Doki" <[email protected]>typed


    > I've had a couple of punctures that I've repaired leak again. The patch
    > bubbles up above the hole and eventually gives up. I've used bog standard
    > cheapo puncture repair kit gear, and done all the usual sanding, lots of
    > time for the glue to dry things. Any ideas?



    Tip Top patches & glue
    ?? two layers of glue
    Check all inner tubes for leaks annually.

    Fix your punctures in batches, at home, when you're in no hurry, have a
    radio or good music to hand and have a BIG mug of tea.

    Check tubes under water following repair.

    Puncture gourmet.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  5. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Doki wrote:
    > I've had a couple of punctures that I've repaired leak again. The
    > patch bubbles up above the hole and eventually gives up. I've used
    > bog standard cheapo puncture repair kit gear, and done all the usual
    > sanding, lots of time for the glue to dry things. Any ideas?


    Alow the glue to completely dry *before* applying patch. (It works as a
    dry contact adhesive). Press patch down firmly, then allow more time for
    it to bond: at least 3 mins, pref 12 hours!

    Do not test tube by inflating it before fitting in tyre (although a little
    air to round it out is ok).

    That should work even with cheapo stuff, but try a different brand of
    patch & cement just in case your's are extraordinarily poor.

    ~PB
     
  6. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:

    > have a BIG mug of tea.


    But only if you're seriously injured, Shirley?
     
  7. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Doki <dok[email protected]> wrote:
    : I've had a couple of punctures that I've repaired leak again. The patch
    : bubbles up above the hole and eventually gives up. I've used bog standard
    : cheapo puncture repair kit gear, and done all the usual sanding, lots of
    : time for the glue to dry things. Any ideas?

    I'll probably get flamed for this, but just bin the tube. If you by tubes
    mail order in batches of 10 you can get them for £1 - £2 a go depending on
    quality. 10 last me 18 mths - 2 years on average.

    My time is worth more than that, and I've never been happy with repairs on
    narrow (23mm) tyres. I've seen them lift off in the heat before and I don't
    want that happening when I'm doing 50mph and braking hard!

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  8. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Doki
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > I've had a couple of punctures that I've repaired leak again. The
    > patch bubbles up above the hole and eventually gives up. I've used bog
    > standard cheapo puncture repair kit gear, and done all the usual
    > sanding, lots of time for the glue to dry things. Any ideas?


    Tip-top patches.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    IMHO, there aren't enough committed Christians, but that's care
    in the community for you. -- Ben Evans
     
  9. Arthur Clune wrote:

    > I'll probably get flamed for this, but just bin the tube. If you by
    > tubes mail order in batches of 10 you can get them for £1 - £2 a go
    > depending on quality. 10 last me 18 mths - 2 years on average.


    Not flamed, but "for differing values of tube." I find it quite hard to get
    genuine 406 tubes (quite often the shops sell a sort of
    one-size-fails-to-fit-all 406 and 451 generic 20" thing), so I tend to keep
    them and repair them. Also, having used up the spare in fixing the
    puncture, I usually want to get a usable spare for the next journey. It is
    an immutable law of physics that the p*nct*re fairy only strikes when the
    shops are shut...

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk
     
  10. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

    > Not flamed, but "for differing values of tube." I find it quite hard to get
    > genuine 406 tubes


    Only particularly impossible if you want that with a presta valve, but
    unfortunately I do :-( (Mental note to self: ask pal about to head to
    Darth Ben's Little Shop of Temptation to get a couple of above as spares
    for the Roosmobile...)

    I did follow Arthur's method when I'd get a pile of Specialized tubes
    for 700 x 28 in the EBC bargain bin at the annual sale, but one downside
    of Weird Bikes is they have Weird (i.e., often not 700c or 26") wheels
    and there is, apparently, "no demand" for such with presta valves (which
    I much prefer to Schraeders). Bah!

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  11. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? <[email protected]crosoft.com> wrote:

    : Not flamed, but "for differing values of tube." I find it quite hard to get
    : genuine 406 tubes (quite often the shops sell a sort of

    But if you are just buying box of 10 mail order once a year this doesn't apply?

    Though if your tubes are more, the economics changes

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  12. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:

    > But if you are just buying box of 10 mail order once a year this doesn't apply?


    Roos was /trying/ to get a couple mail order last week from the Usual
    Suspects. With prestas they really are quite hard to come by in the UK :-(

    > Though if your tubes are more, the economics changes


    And because they're rare, they do indeed cost more :-(

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  13. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    > Maybe you're using the rubber/vulcanising solution as "glue" rather
    > than as the primary repair?


    Is is glue, albeit a type of adhesive that works very well, and best when
    it's dry (or nearly dry). The patch is literally stuck to the tube, and
    that is the main repair, rather than filling in the hole.

    There's no actual vulcanisation or even amalgamating going on so
    "vulcanising solution" is a misnomer, a confusion left over from the days
    when patches really did need to be vulcanised with a flame. Normal modern
    patches can be peeled off to prove this when they're heated. Try pressing
    a patched tube against a heated non-stick frying pan then peeling it off.
    Thanks to Jobst Brandt for this one!

    Some patches do work better than others, and patches can go off if they're
    many years old (or have been stored in hot conditions, I think). Patches
    have stuff which is like dried cement on the foil side.
    I recommend the patches Mike Dyason sells.

    ~PB
     
  14. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:

    > Is is glue, albeit a type of adhesive that works very well, and best when
    > it's dry (or nearly dry). The patch is literally stuck to the tube, and
    > that is the main repair, rather than filling in the hole.


    Well, you learn something every day, they say. I've just learned
    something, so I can go home now! ;-)

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  15. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    > Well, you learn something every day, they say. I've just learned
    > something, so I can go home now! ;-)


    I didn't realise it myself until recently. I did the Brandt Pan test,
    fully expecting to ruin my tube in efforts to remove the patch, but it
    just peeled right off! We've been conned all these years with the
    "vulcanising" marketing BS.

    I'm off for a bike ride if it's cooled down.

    cheers
    ~PB
     
  16. Arthur Clune wrote:

    >> "for differing values of tube." I find it quite
    >> hard to get genuine 406 tubes (quite often the shops sell a sort of


    > But if you are just buying box of 10 mail order once a year this
    > doesn't apply?


    It is hard to find any at all, let alone boxes of ten. Having suffered
    fifteen punctures in two weeks before I worked out what was causing them
    would also have been quite expensive (and stock-exhausting).

    When I find a supply of shiny new ones I buy all they have in stock and bin
    any manky ones from the spares bin. Since I can fix a tube with about five
    minutes of expended time (the chemistry of the glue doesn't actually require
    that I suit watching the glue dry, after all) I consider that a reasonable
    return, especially at anythign up to £5 per tube.

    But I do generally bin cheap Schraeder-valved MTB tubes, for sure.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk
     
  17. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Arthur Clune
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I'll probably get flamed for this, but just bin the tube.


    Happy to agree with you on this one. I can repair a puncture in 5
    minutes but I can replace a tube in under 2.

    > If you by tubes mail order in batches of 10 you can get them for £1
    > - £2 a go depending on quality. 10 last me 18 mths - 2 years on
    > average.


    I use about 150 in an average summer - less when it's dry and more
    when it's wet - and pay significantly less than £1-00:)

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton
    on the Bicycle Island
    In the Global Village
    http://www.millport.net
     
  18. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > Doki <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> I've had a couple of punctures that I've repaired leak again. The
    >> patch bubbles up above the hole and eventually gives up. I've used
    >> bog standard cheapo puncture repair kit gear, and done all the usual
    >> sanding, lots of time for the glue to dry things. Any ideas?

    >
    > I'll probably get flamed for this, but just bin the tube. If you by
    > tubes mail order in batches of 10 you can get them for £1 - £2 a go
    > depending on quality. 10 last me 18 mths - 2 years on average.
    >
    > My time is worth more than that, and I've never been happy with
    > repairs on narrow (23mm) tyres. I've seen them lift off in the heat
    > before and I don't want that happening when I'm doing 50mph and
    > braking hard!
    >
    > Arthur


    I agree with you Arthur.
     
  19. Doki

    Doki Guest

    "Sandy Morton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, Arthur Clune
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > I'll probably get flamed for this, but just bin the tube.

    >
    > Happy to agree with you on this one. I can repair a puncture in 5
    > minutes but I can replace a tube in under 2.
    >
    > > If you by tubes mail order in batches of 10 you can get them for £1
    > > - £2 a go depending on quality. 10 last me 18 mths - 2 years on
    > > average.

    >
    > I use about 150 in an average summer - less when it's dry and more
    > when it's wet - and pay significantly less than £1-00:)


    Where do you buy your tubes, if you don't mind me asking?
     
  20. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Arthur Clune wrote:
    >
    > > But if you are just buying box of 10 mail order once a year this doesn't

    apply?
    >
    > Roos was /trying/ to get a couple mail order last week from the Usual
    > Suspects. With prestas they really are quite hard to come by in the UK :-(


    Have you a logical explanantion for the strong preference, Pete?

    > > Though if your tubes are more, the economics changes

    >
    > And because they're rare, they do indeed cost more :-(


    How does that compare with those having Schraeder valves?
    --
    "Since you must keep improving, a $5 bike offers a lot more opportunities
    to improve it, and can be improved cheaper. It's expensive to improve on
    a $2000 bike." - Rick Onanian in rec.bicycles.tech
     
Loading...
Loading...