'Put fat children on Atkins diet'

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Diarmid Logan, Mar 15, 2004.

  1. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3509792.stm

    'Put fat children on Atkins diet'

    Fat children should be put on Atkins-style diets to lose
    weight and prevent illness, a cancer specialist has said.

    Professor Julian Peto, of the Institute of Cancer Research,
    said high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets could suppress
    appetites and keep children slim.

    Obesity "is now overtaking smoking as the number one killer
    and I am very concerned that we need to tackle it early," he
    told BBC Radio 5
    Live.

    He said dietary advice for children was not working and
    needed a "rethink".

    He added that children should be weighed regularly in
    school.

    The problem of obesity is soaring among children in the UK.

    In 1998, 9% of two to four-year-olds were considered obese -
    almost double the figure in 1989.

    The World Health Organisation says being overweight causes
    diabetes, heart disease and some forms of cancer.

    Professor Peto said the Atkins diet, which involves eating
    lots of meat and other high protein foods, while restricting
    carbohydrates, worked because proteins suppressed the
    appetite and people did not eat as much.

    "I am sure the Atkins wasn't developed on this basis but
    that is why it works," he said.

    "The levels of salt and fat are anything but healthy but the
    basis of the diet - which is low carbohydrate and high
    protein - is ideal for losing weight."

    Opponents of Atkins-style diets claim that, over the long
    term, they can cause kidney damage, thin bones and
    constipation, raise cholesterol levels and increase the risk
    of diabetes and an early heart attack.

    But some British doctors are already putting obese children
    on Atkins-style diets.

    Dr Dee Dawson, medical director at Rhodes Farm Clinic, a
    residential home for treatment of children with eating
    disorders, says the diet is good for children.

    "The children who come here are not just overweight, they
    are ill, and in danger of dying. Some of them can't breathe
    and some of them can't lie down.

    "I do think the basis of Atkins - low carbohydrate and high
    protein - is a good diet for children and the priority is
    for these children to get weight off."

    But nutritionist Dr Toni Steer, of the Medical Research
    Council, warned that there is not enough research into the
    long-term health effects of being on the diet.

    "We realise obesity is a major problem which we need to
    tackle as a matter of urgency but I would be very concerned
    about advising children to follow diets like Atkins."
     
    Tags:


  2. This is funny as this seems to be a dialog of people where
    both of them have no clue as to what they are talking about.

    One says that kids should be put on Atkins, which works
    becaus eit is "high protein". (bullshit, as atkins is a
    high fat diet)

    Another objects by saying essentially nothing
    meaningful at all.

    i

    In article
    <[email protected]>, Diarmid
    Logan wrote:
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3509792.stm
    >
    > 'Put fat children on Atkins diet'
    >
    > Fat children should be put on Atkins-style diets to lose
    > weight and prevent illness, a cancer specialist has said.
    >
    > Professor Julian Peto, of the Institute of Cancer
    > Research, said high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets could
    > suppress appetites and keep children slim.
    >
    > Obesity "is now overtaking smoking as the number one
    > killer and I am very concerned that we need to tackle it
    > early," he told BBC Radio 5
    > Live.
    >
    > He said dietary advice for children was not working and
    > needed a "rethink".
    >
    > He added that children should be weighed regularly
    > in school.
    >
    > The problem of obesity is soaring among children in the
    > UK.
    >
    > In 1998, 9% of two to four-year-olds were considered obese
    > - almost double the figure in 1989.
    >
    > The World Health Organisation says being overweight causes
    > diabetes, heart disease and some forms of cancer.
    >
    > Professor Peto said the Atkins diet, which involves eating
    > lots of meat and other high protein foods, while
    > restricting carbohydrates, worked because proteins
    > suppressed the appetite and people did not eat as much.
    >
    > "I am sure the Atkins wasn't developed on this basis but
    > that is why it works," he said.
    >
    > "The levels of salt and fat are anything but healthy but
    > the basis of the diet - which is low carbohydrate and high
    > protein - is ideal for losing weight."
    >
    > Opponents of Atkins-style diets claim that, over the long
    > term, they can cause kidney damage, thin bones and
    > constipation, raise cholesterol levels and increase the
    > risk of diabetes and an early heart attack.
    >
    > But some British doctors are already putting obese
    > children on Atkins-style diets.
    >
    > Dr Dee Dawson, medical director at Rhodes Farm Clinic, a
    > residential home for treatment of children with eating
    > disorders, says the diet is good for children.
    >
    > "The children who come here are not just overweight, they
    > are ill, and in danger of dying. Some of them can't
    > breathe and some of them can't lie down.
    >
    > "I do think the basis of Atkins - low carbohydrate and
    > high protein - is a good diet for children and the
    > priority is for these children to get weight off."
    >
    > But nutritionist Dr Toni Steer, of the Medical Research
    > Council, warned that there is not enough research into the
    > long-term health effects of being on the diet.
    >
    > "We realise obesity is a major problem which we need to
    > tackle as a matter of urgency but I would be very
    > concerned about advising children to follow diets like
    > Atkins."
     
  3. Mike V

    Mike V Guest

    "Ignoramus21819" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > This is funny as this seems to be a dialog of people
    > where both of
    >
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>, Diarmid
    Logan wrote:
    > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3509792.stm
    > >
    > > 'Put fat children on Atkins diet'
    > >

    Recent research has made it very clear. We are almost all
    living on a STATIN deficient diet. Your kids should "eat
    their 'LIPITIES' " if they want to grow up healthy, and be
    sports heroes.

    MikeV
     
  4. It's not a high fat diet either, in an absolute sense.

    --
    Most of us probably aren't in danger of eating too
    little. :)

    Becky P.

    "Ignoramus21819" <[email protected]> wrote
    in message news:[email protected]...
    > This is funny as this seems to be a dialog of people
    > where both of them have no clue as to what they are
    > talking about.
    >
    > One says that kids should be put on Atkins, which works
    > becaus eit is "high protein". (bullshit, as atkins is a
    > high fat diet)
    >
    > Another objects by saying essentially nothing
    > meaningful at all.
    >
    > i
    >
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>, Diarmid
    Logan wrote:
    > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3509792.stm
    > >
    > > 'Put fat children on Atkins diet'
    > >
    > > Fat children should be put on Atkins-style diets to
    > > lose weight and prevent illness, a cancer specialist
    > > has said.
    > >
    > > Professor Julian Peto, of the Institute of Cancer
    > > Research, said high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets
    > > could suppress appetites and keep children slim.
    > >
    > > Obesity "is now overtaking smoking as the number one
    > > killer and I am very concerned that we need to tackle it
    > > early," he told BBC Radio 5
    > > Live.
    > >
    > > He said dietary advice for children was not working and
    > > needed a "rethink".
    > >
    > > He added that children should be weighed regularly in
    > > school.
    > >
    > > The problem of obesity is soaring among children in
    > > the UK.
    > >
    > > In 1998, 9% of two to four-year-olds were considered
    > > obese - almost double the figure in 1989.
    > >
    > > The World Health Organisation says being overweight
    > > causes diabetes, heart disease and some forms of cancer.
    > >
    > > Professor Peto said the Atkins diet, which involves
    > > eating lots of meat and other high protein foods, while
    > > restricting carbohydrates, worked because proteins
    > > suppressed the appetite and people did not eat as much.
    > >
    > > "I am sure the Atkins wasn't developed on this basis but
    > > that is why it works," he said.
    > >
    > > "The levels of salt and fat are anything but healthy but
    > > the basis of the diet - which is low carbohydrate and
    > > high protein - is ideal for losing weight."
    > >
    > > Opponents of Atkins-style diets claim that, over the
    > > long term, they can cause kidney damage, thin bones and
    > > constipation, raise cholesterol levels and increase the
    > > risk of diabetes and an early heart attack.
    > >
    > > But some British doctors are already putting obese
    > > children on Atkins-style diets.
    > >
    > > Dr Dee Dawson, medical director at Rhodes Farm Clinic, a
    > > residential home for treatment of children with eating
    > > disorders, says the diet is good for children.
    > >
    > > "The children who come here are not just overweight,
    > > they are ill, and in danger of dying. Some of them can't
    > > breathe and some of them can't lie down.
    > >
    > > "I do think the basis of Atkins - low carbohydrate and
    > > high protein - is a good diet for children and the
    > > priority is for these children to get weight off."
    > >
    > > But nutritionist Dr Toni Steer, of the Medical Research
    > > Council, warned that there is not enough research into
    > > the long-term health effects of being on the diet.
    > >
    > > "We realise obesity is a major problem which we need to
    > > tackle as a matter of urgency but I would be very
    > > concerned about advising children to follow diets like
    > > Atkins."
     
  5. How stupid can it get!!! Get them out the door to exercise
    and don't take them to McDonald's and make them eat fruit
    instead of chips. There is not long-term data on Atkins and
    it's dangerous to do something to kids that isn't adequately
    tested on adults.

    Diarmid Logan wrote:
     
  6. Mack

    Mack Guest

    The real problem lies with the parents and the pre-schools
    and government schools -- and the way they create early bad
    eating habits in their children.

    My 19-month old grand-daughter, who is being raised by fitness-
    oriented parents and grand-parents, was never fed canned
    baby food and almost never encounters any food with added
    sugar or salt. Her favorite foods are grilled or baked sweet
    potatoes, lean chicken & fish, vegetables, including
    broccoli, green beans and a variety of salad items, and many
    fruits, including strawberries and blueberries. She eats the
    fruits but does not drink the juice without the fiber. She's
    crazy about unsalted pumpkin seeds.

    She never even sees "fast" foods, potato chips, salty
    snacks, sugary cereal and the like. Now that she has stopped
    nursing, she does drink a little cow milk, at her parents'
    house, but also loves the unsweetened soy milk with added
    calcium that she gets at our house.

    So, it seems to me that kids are just learning the bad
    eating habits from their parents. Just about anyone loves
    sweets, for example, because we're programming through
    natural selection to love them. But sweets are food-
    attractants and, even if they had no other bad effects
    (which they do), they would make you fat just by attracting
    you to food. Kids get into the sweet habit early because
    their parents feed them sweets and addict them. Their
    parents eat sweets because their parents did. And everybody
    eats them (and all the other bad foods out there) because
    the food industry is constantly propagandizing us to eat
    more and more of them.

    Slowly but surely changing people's perceptions of what are
    the "good" and "bad" foods is probably a better answer.
    Unfortunately, eating good food is a hassle, compared to
    grabbing off the shelf what you see and giving your kid what
    he asks for, based on what his friends eat or what he's seen
    on TV. And people generally want as close to "something for
    nothing" as they can get. They just won't make the effort.

    mack austin

    "Diarmid Logan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3509792.stm
    >
    > 'Put fat children on Atkins diet'
    >
    > Fat children should be put on Atkins-style diets to lose
    > weight and prevent illness, a cancer specialist has said.
    >
    > Professor Julian Peto, of the Institute of Cancer
    > Research, said high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets could
    > suppress appetites and keep children slim.
    >
    > Obesity "is now overtaking smoking as the number one
    > killer and I am very concerned that we need to tackle it
    > early," he told BBC Radio 5
    > Live.
    >
    > He said dietary advice for children was not working and
    > needed a "rethink".
    >
    > He added that children should be weighed regularly
    > in school.
    >
    > The problem of obesity is soaring among children in the
    > UK.
    >
    > In 1998, 9% of two to four-year-olds were considered obese
    > - almost double the figure in 1989.
    >
    > The World Health Organisation says being overweight causes
    > diabetes, heart disease and some forms of cancer.
    >
    > Professor Peto said the Atkins diet, which involves eating
    > lots of meat and other high protein foods, while
    > restricting carbohydrates, worked because proteins
    > suppressed the appetite and people did not eat as much.
    >
    > "I am sure the Atkins wasn't developed on this basis but
    > that is why it works," he said.
    >
    > "The levels of salt and fat are anything but healthy but
    > the basis of the diet - which is low carbohydrate and high
    > protein - is ideal for losing weight."
    >
    > Opponents of Atkins-style diets claim that, over the long
    > term, they can cause kidney damage, thin bones and
    > constipation, raise cholesterol levels and increase the
    > risk of diabetes and an early heart attack.
    >
    > But some British doctors are already putting obese
    > children on Atkins-style diets.
    >
    > Dr Dee Dawson, medical director at Rhodes Farm Clinic, a
    > residential home for treatment of children with eating
    > disorders, says the diet is good for children.
    >
    > "The children who come here are not just overweight, they
    > are ill, and in danger of dying. Some of them can't
    > breathe and some of them can't lie down.
    >
    > "I do think the basis of Atkins - low carbohydrate and
    > high protein - is a good diet for children and the
    > priority is for these children to get weight off."
    >
    > But nutritionist Dr Toni Steer, of the Medical Research
    > Council, warned that there is not enough research into the
    > long-term health effects of being on the diet.
    >
    > "We realise obesity is a major problem which we need to
    > tackle as a matter of urgency but I would be very
    > concerned about advising children to follow diets like
    > Atkins."
     
  7. Jayjay

    Jayjay Guest

    On 15 Mar 2004 15:59:39 GMT, Ignoramus21819
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >This is funny as this seems to be a dialog of people
    >where both of them have no clue as to what they are
    >talking about.
    >
    >One says that kids should be put on Atkins, which works
    >becaus eit is "high protein". (bullshit, as atkins is a
    >high fat diet)

    BULLSHIT to you too, atkins is not high fat either. In the
    true sense of the way the program works, it should not be
    either high fat or high protein. One should not consume
    excess of either.

    The true reality of atkins is that the calorie depletion
    used to make the weight loss effect is by means of cutting
    out the carbohydrate calories. But not by increasing fat or
    protein. All else remains the same.

    >
    >Another objects by saying essentially nothing
    >meaningful at all.
    >
    >i
     
  8. Atkins doesn't need to be high fat. However i just put my
    garndchildren on a more balanced program with modest amounts
    of bread, rice and potatoes and included a couple of Social
    Tea cookies which are like baby Arrowroot cookies.

    In article <[email protected]>, Ignoramus21819
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This is funny as this seems to be a dialog of people
    > where both of them have no clue as to what they are
    > talking about.
    >
    > One says that kids should be put on Atkins, which works
    > becaus eit is "high protein". (bullshit, as atkins is a
    > high fat diet)
    >
    > Another objects by saying essentially nothing
    > meaningful at all.
    >
    > i
    >
    > In article
    > <[email protected]ogle.com>, Diarmid
    > Logan wrote:
    > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3509792.stm
    > >
    > > 'Put fat children on Atkins diet'
    > >
    > > Fat children should be put on Atkins-style diets to
    > > lose weight and prevent illness, a cancer specialist
    > > has said.
    > >
    > > Professor Julian Peto, of the Institute of Cancer
    > > Research, said high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets
    > > could suppress appetites and keep children slim.
    > >
    > > Obesity "is now overtaking smoking as the number one
    > > killer and I am very concerned that we need to tackle it
    > > early," he told BBC Radio 5
    > > Live.
    > >
    > > He said dietary advice for children was not working and
    > > needed a "rethink".
    > >
    > > He added that children should be weighed regularly in
    > > school.
    > >
    > > The problem of obesity is soaring among children in
    > > the UK.
    > >
    > > In 1998, 9% of two to four-year-olds were considered
    > > obese - almost double the figure in 1989.
    > >
    > > The World Health Organisation says being overweight
    > > causes diabetes, heart disease and some forms of cancer.
    > >
    > > Professor Peto said the Atkins diet, which involves
    > > eating lots of meat and other high protein foods, while
    > > restricting carbohydrates, worked because proteins
    > > suppressed the appetite and people did not eat as much.
    > >
    > > "I am sure the Atkins wasn't developed on this basis but
    > > that is why it works," he said.
    > >
    > > "The levels of salt and fat are anything but healthy but
    > > the basis of the diet - which is low carbohydrate and
    > > high protein - is ideal for losing weight."
    > >
    > > Opponents of Atkins-style diets claim that, over the
    > > long term, they can cause kidney damage, thin bones and
    > > constipation, raise cholesterol levels and increase the
    > > risk of diabetes and an early heart attack.
    > >
    > > But some British doctors are already putting obese
    > > children on Atkins-style diets.
    > >
    > > Dr Dee Dawson, medical director at Rhodes Farm Clinic, a
    > > residential home for treatment of children with eating
    > > disorders, says the diet is good for children.
    > >
    > > "The children who come here are not just overweight,
    > > they are ill, and in danger of dying. Some of them can't
    > > breathe and some of them can't lie down.
    > >
    > > "I do think the basis of Atkins - low carbohydrate and
    > > high protein - is a good diet for children and the
    > > priority is for these children to get weight off."
    > >
    > > But nutritionist Dr Toni Steer, of the Medical Research
    > > Council, warned that there is not enough research into
    > > the long-term health effects of being on the diet.
    > >
    > > "We realise obesity is a major problem which we need to
    > > tackle as a matter of urgency but I would be very
    > > concerned about advising children to follow diets like
    > > Atkins."

    --
    Diva
    *****
    The Best Man for the Job May Be A Woman
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, Mack wrote:
    > The real problem lies with the parents and the pre-schools
    > and government schools -- and the way they create early
    > bad eating habits in their children.
    >
    > My 19-month old grand-daughter, who is being raised by fitness-
    > oriented parents and grand-parents, was never fed canned
    > baby food and almost never encounters any food with added
    > sugar or salt. Her favorite foods are grilled or baked
    > sweet potatoes, lean chicken & fish, vegetables, including
    > broccoli, green beans and a variety of salad items, and
    > many fruits, including strawberries and blueberries. She
    > eats the fruits but does not drink the juice without the
    > fiber. She's crazy about unsalted pumpkin seeds.

    My son (29 months old) also eats no junk food whatsoever and
    almost no sugar. I think that giving kids chidrens' junk
    food designed to be addictive to kids, is insane and
    malicious.

    > She never even sees "fast" foods, potato chips, salty
    > snacks, sugary cereal and the like.

    same here

    > Now that she has stopped nursing, she does drink a little
    > cow milk, at her parents' house, but also loves the
    > unsweetened soy milk with added calcium that she gets at
    > our house.

    I am not at all sure what is the benefit of fake soy milk as
    opposed to cow milk.

    > So, it seems to me that kids are just learning the bad
    > eating habits from their parents.

    It seems to me that feeding children junk food, candy etc,
    is primarily because parents are lazy to cook and give kids
    real food.

    My son knows he is not getting any candy and it is not a
    huge struggle for him.

    i
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, Jayjay wrote:
    > On 15 Mar 2004 15:59:39 GMT, Ignoramus21819
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>This is funny as this seems to be a dialog of people
    >>where both of them have no clue as to what they are
    >>talking about.
    >>
    >>One says that kids should be put on Atkins, which works
    >>becaus eit is "high protein". (bullshit, as atkins is a
    >>high fat diet)
    >
    > BULLSHIT to you too, atkins is not high fat either. In the
    > true sense of the way the program works, it should not be
    > either high fat or high protein. One should not consume
    > excess of either.

    Okay, think about a typical person who eats 2,000 calories
    per day and is on maintenance after losing weight on Atkins.
    This person eats 80 grams of carbs per day (not at all
    unreasonable). This is 320 calories from carbs.

    So, there is 1680 calories that are left, to be filled with
    fat and protein.

    To fill them with, say, 51% of protein, you would need to
    eat about 210 grams of protein, or about 800 grams of turkey
    breast or its equivalent. Very unlikely that an average
    person could stick to eating that much meat for long.

    So, a low carb dieter gets more calories from fat than
    protein. What I have heard reported on alt.support.diet.low-
    carb, is that people get about 60-70% of calories from fat.

    I am not implying that there is anything wrong with eating a
    high fat diet.

    > The true reality of atkins is that the calorie depletion
    > used to make the weight loss effect is by means of cutting
    > out the carbohydrate calories. But not by increasing fat
    > or protein. All else remains the same.

    As a percentage of diet though, fat becomes predominant.

    i
    >>
    >>Another objects by saying essentially nothing
    >>meaningful at all.
    >>
    >>i
    >
     
  11. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    [email protected] (Diarmid Logan) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3509792.stm
    >
    > 'Put fat children on Atkins diet'
    >
    > Fat children should be put on Atkins-style diets to lose
    > weight and prevent illness, a cancer specialist has said.
    >
    > Professor Julian Peto, of the Institute of Cancer
    > Research, said high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets could
    > suppress appetites and keep children slim.
    >
    > Obesity "is now overtaking smoking as the number one
    > killer and I am very concerned that we need to tackle it
    > early," he told BBC Radio 5
    > Live.
    >
    > He said dietary advice for children was not working and
    > needed a "rethink".
    >
    > He added that children should be weighed regularly
    > in school.
    >
    > The problem of obesity is soaring among children in the
    > UK.
    >
    > In 1998, 9% of two to four-year-olds were considered obese
    > - almost double the figure in 1989.
    >
    > The World Health Organisation says being overweight causes
    > diabetes, heart disease and some forms of cancer.
    >
    > Professor Peto said the Atkins diet, which involves eating
    > lots of meat and other high protein foods, while
    > restricting carbohydrates, worked because proteins
    > suppressed the appetite and people did not eat as much.
    >
    > "I am sure the Atkins wasn't developed on this basis but
    > that is why it works," he said.
    >
    > "The levels of salt and fat are anything but healthy but
    > the basis of the diet - which is low carbohydrate and high
    > protein - is ideal for losing weight."
    >
    > Opponents of Atkins-style diets claim that, over the long
    > term, they can cause kidney damage, thin bones and
    > constipation, raise cholesterol levels and increase the
    > risk of diabetes and an early heart attack.
    >
    > But some British doctors are already putting obese
    > children on Atkins-style diets.
    >
    > Dr Dee Dawson, medical director at Rhodes Farm Clinic, a
    > residential home for treatment of children with eating
    > disorders, says the diet is good for children.
    >
    > "The children who come here are not just overweight, they
    > are ill, and in danger of dying. Some of them can't
    > breathe and some of them can't lie down.
    >
    > "I do think the basis of Atkins - low carbohydrate and
    > high protein - is a good diet for children and the
    > priority is for these children to get weight off."
    >
    > But nutritionist Dr Toni Steer, of the Medical Research
    > Council, warned that there is not enough research into the
    > long-term health effects of being on the diet.
    >
    > "We realise obesity is a major problem which we need to
    > tackle as a matter of urgency but I would be very
    > concerned about advising children to follow diets like
    > Atkins."

    Great example of good doctors learning the true basis of
    weight management in spite of the nonsense propounded by
    industry shills.

    Dr Toni Steer is a colleague of the flour queen Dr.
    Susan jebb:

    http://www.fabflour.co.uk/News_weightloss.asp

    "The Flour Advisory Bureau (FAB) and the Grain Information
    Service (GIS) today launch a new review showing that
    overweight people who adopt a range of proven health
    strategies can lose weight and cut the risk of developing
    diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Tackling the Weight of
    the Nation, a peer-reviewed report produced by Dr Susan Jebb
    and Dr Toni Steer of MRC Human Nutrition Research in
    Cambridge, highlights that without urgent and effective
    action, 3 out of 10 adults in the UK will be obese by the
    end of the decade."

    .....

    "Alex Waugh, Director General of the Grain Information
    Service said, "This independent report pulls together the
    very extensive research in relation to low-fat, high
    carbohydrate diets and shows conclusively that an effective,
    realistic and achievable strategy for long-term weight
    management with clear health benefits does exist."

    Of course Dr Toni Steer suggests that we restrict fat and
    increase carbs to lose weight.

    But she admits that refined carbs are no good:

    http://www.diet-i.com/low-carb-diets-nutrition.htm

    quote ************* Unrefined Carbs Best

    She recommends choosing foods that are as unrefined as
    possible, such as whole oats, pasta, whole grain bread, and
    long grain rice, rather than sweetened cereal or pastry.
    Foods such as yoghurt should ideally be sweetened naturally
    with fruit rather than sugar.

    And carbohydrates do not just provide energy. According to
    Dr Jebb's colleague, nutritionist Dr Toni Steer, they also
    contain vital nutrients.

    "They have essential B vitamins like thiamine and folates. A
    lot of these vitamins have a role in energy metabolism in
    the body. ************ endquote

    Refined carbs do not contain these vitamins. They are
    removed in the refining process.

    Here she shows her true colors:

    http://www.pharmj.com/pdf/_donotindex/pj_20030823_news3.pdf

    Without any long term evidence to back up her claims ahe
    says that low-carb is dangerous. So much for scientific
    integrity.

    But we all know what they are up to:

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,8122-835015,00.html

    Just another industry shill earning her keep by selling out
    on her professional integrity.

    TC
     
  12. markd

    markd Guest

    What about controlling the food eaten by what the parent
    puts in front of the children. Over eating and choosing a
    greater proportion of junck foods is the problem, not
    rearranging the food deckchairs on the titanic. If low carb
    gets weight off more quickly, fine, then the real world and
    real lifestyle choices will have to begin, including the
    moderate use of all food groups to keep within a calorie
    requirement range and including the nutrition elements
    required for good health.
     
  13. Tim Tyler

    Tim Tyler Guest

    In sci.life-extension Jayjay <[email protected]> wrote or quoted:
    > On 15 Mar 2004 15:59:39 GMT, Ignoramus21819 wrote:

    > >This is funny as this seems to be a dialog of people
    > >where both of them have no clue as to what they are
    > >talking about.
    > >
    > >One says that kids should be put on Atkins, which works
    > >becaus eit is "high protein". (bullshit, as atkins is a
    > >high fat diet)
    >
    > BULLSHIT to you too, atkins is not high fat either. In the
    > true sense of the way the program works, it should not be
    > either high fat or high protein. One should not consume
    > excess of either.
    >
    > The true reality of atkins is that the calorie depletion
    > used to make the weight loss effect is by means of cutting
    > out the carbohydrate calories. But not by increasing fat
    > or protein. All else remains the same.

    When a diet is described as "high in fat", it usually means
    the *percentage* of fat in the diet is high.

    It's the same with high protein diets.

    Atkins is a low carb diet - so it is high in fats and
    proteins - at least as far as the percentages go.
    --
    __________
    |im |yler http://timtyler.org/ [email protected] Remove
    lock to reply.
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>, Bob in CT wrote:
    > On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 19:57:39 GMT, Tim Tyler
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> In sci.life-extension Jayjay <[email protected]> wrote
    >> or quoted:
    >>> On 15 Mar 2004 15:59:39 GMT, Ignoramus21819 wrote:
    >>
    >>> >This is funny as this seems to be a dialog of people
    >>> >where both of them have no clue as to what they are
    >>> >talking about.
    >>> >
    >>> >One says that kids should be put on Atkins, which works
    >>> >becaus eit is "high protein". (bullshit, as atkins is a
    >>> >high fat diet)
    >>>
    >>> BULLSHIT to you too, atkins is not high fat either. In
    >>> the true sense of the way the program works, it should
    >>> not be either high fat or high protein. One should not
    >>> consume excess of either.
    >>>
    >>> The true reality of atkins is that the calorie depletion
    >>> used to make the weight loss effect is by means of
    >>> cutting out the carbohydrate calories. But not by
    >>> increasing fat or protein. All else remains the same.
    >>
    >> When a diet is described as "high in fat", it usually
    >> means the *percentage* of fat in the diet is high.
    >>
    >> It's the same with high protein diets.
    >>
    >> Atkins is a low carb diet - so it is high in fats and
    >> proteins - at least as far as the percentages go.
    >
    > I'd say that it's high in fat, normal in protein, and low
    > in carb (and normal in fiber).
    >

    That would be an ideal low carb diet as I imagine it, as
    well. It could even be high in fiber.

    i
     
  15. Mack

    Mack Guest

    "Ignoramus21819" <[email protected]> wrote

    > I am not at all sure what is the benefit of fake soy milk
    > as opposed to cow milk.

    I don't want to drift off into a cow's milk argument here. I
    suggest you put "What's wrong with cow's milk?" into Google.
    You will get all the arguments on both sides and, believe
    me, there are plenty of them.

    I drank huge amounts of cow's milk when I was kid and, sure
    enough, I was a fat kid. But as my children were growing up,
    we seldom had it in the house because I had stopped drinking
    it long before and one of my sons could not drink even a
    swallow of the stuff because it caused his sinuses, throat
    and chest to start pumping out large quantities of mucus.
    (Not unusual, I understand.) I have just long taken the
    position that cow's milk has evolved specifically to make
    more cows. Seems to me that milk is baby food, and baby
    humans need to drink human milk and adult humans, no milk at
    all. But others may and do differ.

    mack austin
     
  16. That T Woman

    That T Woman Guest

    "Ignoramus21819" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Mack wrote:
    > > The real problem lies with the parents and the pre-
    > > schools and
    government
    > > schools -- and the way they create early bad eating
    > > habits in their children.
    > >
    > > My 19-month old grand-daughter, who is being raised by
    > > fitness-oriented parents and grand-parents, was never
    > > fed canned baby food and almost
    never
    > > encounters any food with added sugar or salt. Her
    > > favorite foods are grilled or baked sweet potatoes, lean
    > > chicken & fish, vegetables,
    including
    > > broccoli, green beans and a variety of salad items, and
    > > many fruits, including strawberries and blueberries. She
    > > eats the fruits but does
    not
    > > drink the juice without the fiber. She's crazy about
    > > unsalted pumpkin seeds.
    >
    > My son (29 months old) also eats no junk food whatsoever
    > and almost no sugar. I think that giving kids chidrens'
    > junk food designed to be addictive to kids, is insane and
    > malicious.
    >
    >
    > > She never even sees "fast" foods, potato chips, salty
    > > snacks, sugary
    cereal
    > > and the like.
    >
    > same here
    >
    > > Now that she has stopped nursing, she does drink a
    > > little cow milk, at her parents' house, but also loves
    > > the unsweetened soy milk
    with
    > > added calcium that she gets at our house.
    >
    > I am not at all sure what is the benefit of fake soy milk
    > as opposed to cow milk.
    >

    In cow's milk you have all kinds of hormones that are given
    to the cows and pass through in the milk. I was reading on
    another fitness related newsgroup and the guys were
    discussing how you can get really huge (hooge I think is how
    they put it) by drinking a gallon of whole milk a day not
    just from the calories but also from the growth hormones.
    Soy milk doesn't have those things in it. I can't drink cow
    milk or most other dairy products because they cause too
    much phlegm production in my sinuses. I don't know what
    component in cow milk causes that but it's a severe reaction
    in me that I go out of my way to avoid.

    Tonia
     
  17. Diarmid Logan wrote:
    >
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3509792.stm 'Put fat
    > children on Atkins diet' Fat children should be put on Atkins-
    > style diets to lose weight and prevent illness, a cancer
    > specialist has said.
    ...
    > "The levels of salt and fat are anything but healthy but
    > the basis of the diet - which is low carbohydrate and high
    > protein - is ideal for losing weight."

    And the mandatory veggies, too. Why didn't he mention them?

    > Opponents of Atkins-style diets claim that, over the long
    > term, they can cause kidney damage, thin bones and
    > constipation, raise cholesterol levels and increase the
    > risk of diabetes and an early heart attack.

    These guys really ought to try using facts for a change. Oh
    right, if they did that they'd stop being opponents. Atkins
    does not damage kidneys and is actively helpfull for the
    rest. Clueless folks.
     
  18. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    "Diarmid Logan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3509792.stm
    >
    > 'Put fat children on Atkins diet'

    I prefer: Help families with overweight children learn to
    eat better and get more excercise.

    Jeff's rules of food:

    1) No arguements at the dinner table. ((s)he who starts and
    arguement leaves the table).

    2) No mentioning how much or how little one eats at
    the table.

    3) All food is eaten and all drink (except water) is drunk
    in designated areas (e.g., kitchen, dining room table).

    4) No food in front of the TV/computer.

    5) Only two hours of recreational computer, TV and video
    game use per day, combined.

    6) Little unhealthy food is brought into the house
    (unhealthy food includes chips, cookies, cake)

    7) When you can walk, you walk (e.g., if the grocery store
    is two blocks away, you walk, not ride.

    8) The family goes to the park, church, etc., together. Jeff
     
  19. Pizza Girl

    Pizza Girl Guest

    Use pure cream instead of milk, untrimmed meat instead of
    lean, no low fat products etc.

    High fat and bad for you. A high protein I go for but not
    high fat too.

    "JC Der Koenig" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It's not a high fat diet either, in an absolute sense.
    >
    > --
    > Most of us probably aren't in danger of eating too
    > little. :)
    >
    > Becky P.
    >
    > "Ignoramus21819" <[email protected]>
    > wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > This is funny as this seems to be a dialog of people
    > > where both of them have no clue as to what they are
    > > talking about.
    > >
    > > One says that kids should be put on Atkins, which works
    > > becaus eit is "high protein". (bullshit, as atkins is a
    > > high fat diet)
    > >
    > > Another objects by saying essentially nothing meaningful
    > > at all.
    > >
    > > i
    > >
    > > In article
    > > <[email protected]>,
    > > Diarmid
    > Logan wrote:
    > > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3509792.stm
    > > >
    > > > 'Put fat children on Atkins diet'
    > > >
    > > > Fat children should be put on Atkins-style diets to
    > > > lose weight and prevent illness, a cancer specialist
    > > > has said.
    > > >
    > > > Professor Julian Peto, of the Institute of Cancer
    > > > Research, said high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets
    > > > could suppress appetites and keep children slim.
    > > >
    > > > Obesity "is now overtaking smoking as the number one
    > > > killer and I am very concerned that we need to tackle
    > > > it early," he told BBC Radio 5
    > > > Live.
    > > >
    > > > He said dietary advice for children was not working
    > > > and needed a "rethink".
    > > >
    > > > He added that children should be weighed regularly in
    > > > school.
    > > >
    > > > The problem of obesity is soaring among children in
    > > > the UK.
    > > >
    > > > In 1998, 9% of two to four-year-olds were considered
    > > > obese - almost double the figure in 1989.
    > > >
    > > > The World Health Organisation says being overweight
    > > > causes diabetes, heart disease and some forms of
    > > > cancer.
    > > >
    > > > Professor Peto said the Atkins diet, which involves
    > > > eating lots of meat and other high protein foods,
    > > > while restricting carbohydrates, worked because
    > > > proteins suppressed the appetite and people did not
    > > > eat as much.
    > > >
    > > > "I am sure the Atkins wasn't developed on this basis
    > > > but that is why it works," he said.
    > > >
    > > > "The levels of salt and fat are anything but healthy
    > > > but the basis of the diet - which is low carbohydrate
    > > > and high protein - is ideal for losing weight."
    > > >
    > > > Opponents of Atkins-style diets claim that, over the
    > > > long term, they can cause kidney damage, thin bones
    > > > and constipation, raise cholesterol levels and
    > > > increase the risk of diabetes and an early heart
    > > > attack.
    > > >
    > > > But some British doctors are already putting obese
    > > > children on Atkins-style diets.
    > > >
    > > > Dr Dee Dawson, medical director at Rhodes Farm Clinic,
    > > > a residential home for treatment of children with
    > > > eating disorders, says the diet is good for children.
    > > >
    > > > "The children who come here are not just overweight,
    > > > they are ill, and in danger of dying. Some of them
    > > > can't breathe and some of them can't lie down.
    > > >
    > > > "I do think the basis of Atkins - low carbohydrate and
    > > > high protein - is a good diet for children and the
    > > > priority is for these children to get weight off."
    > > >
    > > > But nutritionist Dr Toni Steer, of the Medical
    > > > Research Council, warned that there is not enough
    > > > research into the long-term health effects of being on
    > > > the diet.
    > > >
    > > > "We realise obesity is a major problem which we need
    > > > to tackle as a matter of urgency but I would be very
    > > > concerned about advising children to follow diets like
    > > > Atkins."
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>, That T Woman wrote:
    > In cow's milk you have all kinds of hormones that are
    > given to the cows and pass through in the milk. I was
    > reading on another fitness related newsgroup and the guys
    > were discussing how you can get really huge (hooge I think
    > is how they put it) by drinking a gallon of whole milk a
    > day not just from the calories but also from the growth
    > hormones. Soy milk doesn't have those things in it. I
    > can't drink cow milk or most other dairy products because
    > they cause too much phlegm production in my sinuses. I
    > don't know what component in cow milk causes that but it's
    > a severe reaction in me that I go out of my way to avoid.

    That's interesting. A gallon of whole milk, if I am not
    mistaken, 2273 calories. About as much as I eat on average.
    So if I drank a gallon of milk in addition to my regular
    food, I would gey hyoooge, no doubt!

    Anyway, I will read up on milk and hormones. Is there
    perhaps more expensive milk that is made from cows not fed
    hormones? Such as "organic" milk?

    Or are you referring to hormones that cows create naturally
    so that their little ones grow faster?

    i
     
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