Q: old helmet straps

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Toobdood, Aug 18, 2003.

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  1. Toobdood

    Toobdood Guest

    I've got an old Bell V1 Pro helmet that has some broken straps. Do shops sell replacement straps, or
    am I going to have to buy a whole new helmet? Thanks...
     
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  2. Fraggle

    Fraggle Guest

    toobdood <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > I've got an old Bell V1 Pro helmet that has some broken straps. Do shops sell replacement straps,
    > or am I going to have to buy a whole new helmet? Thanks...
    >

    New helmet time.

    The protectiveness of helmets degrades quite fast, you should replace your helmet every couple of
    years as a matter of course, and immediately if you drop it from around saddle height, even if it
    does not look damaged.

    fragg - I don't work for a helmet manufacturer ;)
     
  3. On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 00:44:35 +0000, Fraggle wrote:

    > The protectiveness of helmets degrades quite fast, you should replace your helmet every couple of
    > years as a matter of course, and immediately if you drop it from around saddle height, even if it
    > does not look damaged.
    >
    >
    > fragg - I don't work for a helmet manufacturer ;)

    But you might as well. Dropped from saddle height? I don't trust my head to something that will fall
    apart when dropped from 4 feet! What do you think those foam hats are made out of, glass? Toss it in
    the back of a car, and you should replace it, by that reasoning.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Become MicroSoft-free forever. Ask me how. _`\(,_ | (_)/ (_) |
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, toobdood <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I've got an old Bell V1 Pro helmet that has some broken straps. Do shops sell replacement straps,
    >or am I going to have to buy a whole new helmet? Thanks...

    Bulk webbing and replacement buckles are generally to be found at camping/outdoor type stores, and
    some fabric stores.

    --Paul
     
  5. R15757

    R15757 Guest

    toobdood x 2 wrote << I've got an old Bell V1 Pro helmet that has some broken straps. Do shops sell
    replacement straps, or am I going to have to buy a whole new helmet? Thanks.. >>

    If it could be fixed the Bell will provide more protection than a modern helmet, because it is a
    true hard shell helmet as opposed to a layer of styrofoam covered with a paper-thin sheet of
    plastic. The new helmets are not really an improvement over the old style in terms of safety, but
    they're lighter and racier and they sell a lot more helmets now.

    Robert
     
  6. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    19 Aug 2003 06:34:20 GMT,
    <[email protected]>, [email protected] (R15757) wrote, in part:

    >The new helmets are not really an improvement over the old style in terms of safety, but they're
    >lighter and racier and they sell a lot more helmets now.
    >
    >Robert

    My new mutt is a hard shell. I drop it. I wear it. It sits in the rain. The street style BMX type
    pot holds up well to daily use.

    I can buy barely worn Bell V1 Pro helmets from garage sales and thrift store or less than the cost
    of new webbing. New pads are easy to fit.
    --
    zk
     
  7. Fraggle

    Fraggle Guest

    Ken <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Fraggle <[email protected]> wrote in news:Xns93DC11C9146F5Fragglerock1 @195.129.110.200:
    > > The protectiveness of helmets degrades quite fast, you should replace your helmet every couple
    > > of years as a matter of course
    >
    > Do you work for a helmet company?

    Check my last post ;)

    So here is my explanation, which I cannot back up as google is not providing the goods, so if you
    don't believe me fine.

    Bike helmets work by crushing air filled polystyrene the hard shell does no cushioning and if the
    styrene cracks it has much less power to absorb your heads momentum (I guess because the fragments
    of helmet are light and just move out the way)

    over a period of years the nature of the material degrade such that cracking is more likely than
    crushing, thus the helm is less efficient. Dropping your helm from even a short height is somewhat
    likely to start cracks in the styrene, which again will make cracking of the shell more likely
    than crushing.

    The hard heavy shell has no real protective benefit, which is why they have been removed in more
    modern helms.

    Helms are cheap and easy to replace, you brain is less so.

    As I say believe me or don't. I won't reply again, as there are enough helmet threads on Usenet
    as it is ;)

    Fragg
     
  8. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

  9. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "Fraggle" <Fra[email protected]> wrote

    > The hard heavy shell has no real protective benefit, which is why they have been removed in more
    > modern helms.

    Riiight.

    Pete
     
  10. I suggest you contact Bell about this. I have heard, (but have no first hand knowledge), that they
    are fairly liberal in replacing helmets.

    Ernie

    toobdood wrote:

    > I've got an old Bell V1 Pro helmet that has some broken straps. Do shops sell replacement straps,
    > or am I going to have to buy a whole new helmet? Thanks...
     
  11. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    toobdood wrote:
    >
    > I've got an old Bell V1 Pro helmet that has some broken straps. Do shops sell replacement straps,
    > or am I going to have to buy a whole new helmet? Thanks...

    I have the original 1975 Bell helmet and the plastic thingy on each strap broke long ago; I simply
    discarded them and tied (using a knot(tm)) a couple of straps from who-knows-where and tie it in a
    bow to fasten the helmet. It works fine. The point of a helmet is to keep your head cool by soaking
    up sweat (maxipad in forehead position) and shading you from the sun. Wear a baseball cap under it
    to keep the bugs out of your hair.

    Airflow over the hair is vastly overrated for cooling. You don't need it. You have a thousand square
    meters of sweating skin elsewhere. Something like that.
    --
    Ron Hardin [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  12. Patrick Lamb

    Patrick Lamb Guest

    On 19 Aug 2003 00:44:35 GMT, Fraggle <[email protected]> wrote:

    >toobdood <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> I've got an old Bell V1 Pro helmet that has some broken straps. Do shops sell replacement straps,
    >> or am I going to have to buy a whole new helmet? Thanks...
    >>
    >
    >New helmet time.

    I agree with this conclusion, but I think your reasons are spurious. It's new helmet time simply
    because the time and effort required to find and replace broken straps, sewing on the buckles, etc.,
    simply isn't worth it. Go to the LBS and buy a $30-40 helmet instead!

    Pat
     
  13. J. Cohn

    J. Cohn Guest

    Zoot Katz <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > 19 Aug 2003 06:34:20 GMT,
    > <[email protected]>, [email protected] (R15757) wrote, in part:
    >>
    > I can buy barely worn Bell V1 Pro helmets from garage sales and thrift store or less than the cost
    > of new webbing. New pads are easy to fit.

    What kind of replacement pads do you use? I tried getting some from Bell a couple of years ago, but
    they had moved on to other things...

    J. Cohn (another good day to ride in) Honolulu, Hawaii
     
  14. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    20 Aug 2003 13:01:10 -0700,
    <[email protected]>, [email protected] (J. Cohn) wrote:

    >What kind of replacement pads do you use? I tried getting some from Bell a couple of years ago, but
    >they had moved on to other things...

    I grabbed an assortment of new replacement pads the bike shop was throwing out and cut some to fit.
    --
    zk
     
  15. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    Ron Hardin <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You have a thousand square meters of sweating skin elsewhere. Something like that.

    That would make the OP the equivalent of a sweaty skin sphere 59 feet in diameter, who, assuming he
    were solid, would weigh around 84,000 pounds. Quite a spectacle if he could still ride a bike.

    Chalo Colina shorter than 59' and lighter than 84k#
     
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