Quad tightness won't go away



relliott

New Member
Jul 29, 2010
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What can you do for quad tightness/soreness that keeps coming back?
I find that it doesn't take a very intense cycling workout to get my right quad tight and a little sore.
The it stays tight for several weeks, and I don't really want to return to intense workouts until it feels better.
Any suggestions?
 

TKOS

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Oct 6, 2004
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A little massage therapy might not hurt either. You may have some minor scar tissue adhesions built up between muscles that could be worked out in a couple of good sessions.

Alternatively they sell nice foam rollers that you can use on yourself at home to get a similar result. These are usually found at runner or triathlon stores.
 

relliott

New Member
Jul 29, 2010
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Thanks. That's what I'm thinking that there may be some scar tissue.
Either that or a vitamin deficiency?
Every time I return to higher intensity, the tight quad comes back...
 

swampy1970

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2008
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If you go too hard for too long then things will hurt... It's a given.

Stretch properly after rides. Massage will help - quads are easy to get too so you could read up and do that yourself. You could also do a pretty effective deep tissue massage if you have a large diameter "foam massage roll" that's just high density foam that's about 9" in diameter and a few feet long. You could read into that too.

But for now I'd stick with the stretching and dialing back the effort a bit.

Ensure that you're getting enough carbohydrates to support the work that you're doing and enough protein to support recovery.
 

Deafwolf

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Jun 21, 2010
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I have also heard great things about compression stockings. Wear them at night or post ride/shower. I just got a pair to try out since my calves tighten after rides.
 

CalicoCat

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Jan 10, 2010
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+1 on the foam roller. I roll out my quads, IT band, and calves every few days. This can hurt initially!!!! But it really helps when a massage is just too expensive and extravegant. I also second what others said about dialing back the intensity. Intesnity is great for building strength, fitness, and speed. However, you have to build up to that. Start with long moderate paced rides, get a good solid fitness base and then work intensity into your training plan. Even after intesnsity sessions, you should be feeling tired, and your legs could be feeling a bit achy, but after a day or so, you should be totally recovered.
 

swampy1970

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Feb 3, 2008
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Originally Posted by tonyzackery .

I'm thinking leg length discrepancy here...
He should just use the legs that feel good on the road bike and return the odd length ones that seem to hurt on the mountain bike... :p



Originally Posted by CalicoCat .


+1 on the foam roller. I roll out my quads, IT band, and calves every few days. This can hurt initially!!!! But it really helps when a massage is just too expensive and extravegant. I also second what others said about dialing back the intensity. Intesnity is great for building strength, fitness, and speed. However, you have to build up to that. Start with long moderate paced rides, get a good solid fitness base and then work intensity into your training plan. Even after intesnsity sessions, you should be feeling tired, and your legs could be feeling a bit achy, but after a day or so, you should be totally recovered.
If you feel totally recovered then you're not training often enough or hard enough. Unless training has really changed lots the only time you should feel great is just before a targeted event or after a week off the bike in November. That summed it up for me - the rest of the time I had sore legs. But as you said, you need to build into a hard period of training - you just can't jump on the bike and murder the bike day in and out.

Maybe just a period of easy riding could do the trick.
 

CalicoCat

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Jan 10, 2010
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Originally Posted by swampy1970 .

Quote: Originally Posted by CalicoCat .


+1 on the foam roller. I roll out my quads, IT band, and calves every few days. This can hurt initially!!!! But it really helps when a massage is just too expensive and extravegant. I also second what others said about dialing back the intensity. Intesnity is great for building strength, fitness, and speed. However, you have to build up to that. Start with long moderate paced rides, get a good solid fitness base and then work intensity into your training plan. Even after intesnsity sessions, you should be feeling tired, and your legs could be feeling a bit achy, but after a day or so, you should be totally recovered.
If you feel totally recovered then you're not training often enough or hard enough. Unless training has really changed lots the only time you should feel great is just before a targeted event or after a week off the bike in November. That summed it up for me - the rest of the time I had sore legs. But as you said, you need to build into a hard period of training - you just can't jump on the bike and murder the bike day in and out.

Maybe just a period of easy riding could do the trick.





Ok, maybe "totally recovered" was a slight overstatement. However, I really don't advocate going into an intensity session with dead legs, you want to be feeling good enough to put out a solid effort. That is what I meant. If your legs are still VERY sore a couple days after a workout you (and by you, I am speaking generally) are probably doing something wrong - either too much too soon, or poor nutrition/poor recovery habits.
 

swampy1970

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Feb 3, 2008
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Originally Posted by CalicoCat .




Ok, maybe "totally recovered" was a slight overstatement. However, I really don't advocate going into an intensity session with dead legs, you want to be feeling good enough to put out a solid effort. That is what I meant. If your legs are still VERY sore a couple days after a workout you (and by you, I am speaking generally) are probably doing something wrong - either too much too soon, or poor nutrition/poor recovery habits.
I used to have that belief...
... then my coach told me to get my finger out and do some harder work on consecutive days when required.

If you do it for months on end you'll end up dead on the bike but if you work harder you just need to rest harder. Unless you're pounding out big 5+ hour days you don't need to change up the diet too much either. If you do anything harder for the first time you'll end up feeling like crud and unless you really are reaching the limits of human endurance then chances are the "discomfort" you're feeling will be somewhat temporary and something that a good nights kip and a bit of feet up infront of the tele won't help aleviate for the most part.

At the end of the day it all boils down to what you want to do and how well you want to do it. If you subscribe whole heartedly to the notion of never doing consecutive days of very hard training then good luck with the 2 or 3 day mini-stage races. If those events are not part of your calendar then a diet of "death on the bike" with added chili probably isn't on your menu.
 

CalicoCat

Member
Jan 10, 2010
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Originally Posted by swampy1970 .


Quote: Originally Posted by CalicoCat .




Ok, maybe "totally recovered" was a slight overstatement. However, I really don't advocate going into an intensity session with dead legs, you want to be feeling good enough to put out a solid effort. That is what I meant. If your legs are still VERY sore a couple days after a workout you (and by you, I am speaking generally) are probably doing something wrong - either too much too soon, or poor nutrition/poor recovery habits.
I used to have that belief...
... then my coach told me to get my finger out and do some harder work on consecutive days when required.

If you do it for months on end you'll end up dead on the bike but if you work harder you just need to rest harder. Unless you're pounding out big 5+ hour days you don't need to change up the diet too much either. If you do anything harder for the first time you'll end up feeling like crud and unless you really are reaching the limits of human endurance then chances are the "discomfort" you're feeling will be somewhat temporary and something that a good nights kip and a bit of feet up infront of the tele won't help aleviate for the most part.

At the end of the day it all boils down to what you want to do and how well you want to do it. If you subscribe whole heartedly to the notion of never doing consecutive days of very hard training then good luck with the 2 or 3 day mini-stage races. If those events are not part of your calendar then a diet of "death on the bike" with added chili probably isn't on your menu.



I do understand what you are saying. I have not entered multi-day stage races, but do have one tentatively on the calender for the 2011 season, so I should probably give some extra thought to what you are saying. Unfortunately, I am peaking for an event a month before, so I don't know what kind of shape I'll be in for the stage race. Since it's my first stage race, and not a target race, I just want to see what it is like, and see how I do.

Although I didn't have any stage races on the 2010 calender, I did have a couple weekends of more than one race, including back to back road races on sat/sun. I did feel pretty beat up by the end of the 2nd race, but we had a team win that day, and I finished 5th, so still a pretty good showing, but I probably could have done better had I not raced the day before (I was useless in trying to make a break happen). That being said, it isn't like I don't train on consecutive days at all. Year round, saturdays are interval days (or races) for me, and sundays are long rides (3+hrs in the winter, and 5+hrs in-season). However, on sundays, I am asking my body to go long, not to put out hard efforts, so if my legs are sore from the day before, it is not really a problem, and monday is active recovery, so I still try to be rested before my next round of hard work (Tues/thurs are hard workouts, and where I get in my best structured training, because in-season, these days are never disrupted by weekend races).

Given that I have a stage race on the calender, and probably some weekends with multiple races (keeping in mind that these aren't going to be target races exactly) I would be curious to hear how you would go about training.
 

stevechow

New Member
Mar 11, 2006
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coffee and lots of rest. maybe you should take 2 weeks or 1 month off. better is to see a physiotherapist or someone who knows what the symptoms and treatments. you may need to invest some money.

cheers,
Cao