Question about bike locks

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Freewheeling, May 5, 2006.

  1. Freewheeling

    Freewheeling Guest

    I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations about bike locks. I
    had an Evolution Mini Kryptonite that got lost, and I'm wondering if I
    should just get another one, of if there's now something better.
    Looking for something that's both lightweight and secure. Or etwas anderes.
     
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  2. landotter

    landotter Guest

    If you're in Manhattan, get some heat treated chain, cover it with
    fabric, and get the most bad-ass padlock money can buy.

    Anywhere else, I really like the mini u-lock +cable approach, using
    Sheldon's method: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html

    I got an On-guard mini lock and cable from REI. Great price, strong
    enough for my city, and visually it looks pretty damn invincible. I'm
    not saying it's better than Kryptos, just that visual deterrents are a
    good thing. ;-)
     
  3. Veloise

    Veloise Guest

    Freewheeling wrote:
    > I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations about bike locks. I
    > had an Evolution Mini Kryptonite that got lost, and I'm wondering if I
    > should just get another one, of if there's now something better.
    > Looking for something that's both lightweight and secure. Or etwas anderes.


    There's a handcuff-like lock out that's pretty good. Too large to use
    as handcuffs (unless the perp is huge) and works well with parking
    meters. Might add a cable or chain to it to secure more of the bike.

    I had one and it got stolen out of my car in downtown Detroit. They
    found the spare keys to it, but didn't take those. (If they were smart,
    they'd have real jobs.)

    HTH

    --Karen D.
     
  4. DougC

    DougC Guest

    Veloise wrote:
    > Freewheeling wrote:
    >
    >>I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations about bike locks. I
    >>had an Evolution Mini Kryptonite that got lost, and I'm wondering if I
    >>should just get another one, of if there's now something better.
    >>Looking for something that's both lightweight and secure. Or etwas anderes.

    >
    >
    > There's a handcuff-like lock out that's pretty good. Too large to use
    > as handcuffs (unless the perp is huge) and works well with parking
    > meters. Might add a cable or chain to it to secure more of the bike.
    >
    > I had one and it got stolen out of my car in downtown Detroit. They
    > found the spare keys to it, but didn't take those. (If they were smart,
    > they'd have real jobs.)
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > --Karen D.
    >

    The handcuff one is made by Master; HostelShoppe for one place sells it
    for $75 or so. I just ordered one as I saw a lot of others said it was a
    good combination of easy to carry and easy to use.
     
  5. DougC

    DougC Guest

    landotter wrote:
    > If you're in Manhattan, get some heat treated chain, cover it with
    > fabric, and get the most bad-ass padlock money can buy.
    >
    > Anywhere else, I really like the mini u-lock +cable approach, using
    > Sheldon's method: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html
    >
    > I got an On-guard mini lock and cable from REI. Great price, strong
    > enough for my city, and visually it looks pretty damn invincible. I'm
    > not saying it's better than Kryptos, just that visual deterrents are a
    > good thing. ;-)
    >


    Sheldon is not as smart as he thinks. Or maybe his lock-strategy has
    changed--I saw no cable at all.
    ?????
    The frame of the bike is the most-expensive part, and the hardest part
    to replace. Only locking up the back wheel doesn't protect the frame. It
    would be pretty easy to saw through the wheel and walk away rolling the
    bike, leaving the lock on the pole.
    ~~~~~~
     
  6. Ian Smith

    Ian Smith Guest

    On Sat, 06 May 2006, DougC <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Only locking up the back wheel doesn't protect the frame. It
    > would be pretty easy to saw through the wheel


    Have you tried it? It seems to me a bike wheel would be a bit tricky
    to saw through. The rim is in moderate compression, and sawing
    through things in compression can be difficult, because the sides of
    the saw-cut grip the saw-blade. There's also the tyre bead to get
    through. I think it would be easier to crop through the wheel,
    assuming you can find croppers whose jaws open wide enough.

    regards, Ian SMith
    --
    |\ /| no .sig
    |o o|
    |/ \|
     
  7. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    Freewheeling wrote:
    > I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations about bike locks. I
    > had an Evolution Mini Kryptonite that got lost, and I'm wondering if I
    > should just get another one, of if there's now something better. Looking
    > for something that's both lightweight and secure. Or etwas anderes.


    One article:
    <http://www.slate.com/id/2140083/>
     
  8. On Fri, 05 May 2006 22:29:18 -0400, Freewheeling
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations about bike locks. I
    >had an Evolution Mini Kryptonite that got lost, and I'm wondering if I
    >should just get another one, of if there's now something better.
    >Looking for something that's both lightweight and secure. Or etwas anderes.


    Abus has a new foldable lock called "Bordo" (see www.abus.de). It
    doesn´t reach the security levels of heavy U-locks, but it´s more or
    less "lightweight" and quite compact when folded.

    In Germany the Bordo lock is currently out of stock (maybe because of
    its success among folding bike owners), but AFAIK it will be available
    again within the next weeks.

    Regards,
    Christian
    http://www.tinyworld.de
     
  9. Victor Kan

    Victor Kan Guest

    DougC wrote:
    > The handcuff one is made by Master; HostelShoppe for one place sells it
    > for $75 or so. I just ordered one as I saw a lot of others said it was a
    > good combination of easy to carry and easy to use.


    I got mine recently from amazon.com for $50 with free shipping:

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0009V1WQQ?v=glance

    --
    I do not accept unsolicited commercial e-mail. Remove NO_UCE for
    legitimate replies.
     
  10. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "Ian Smith" wrote: Have you tried it? It seems to me a bike wheel would
    be a bit tricky to saw through. (clip)
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    What woukld go through the mind of the thief? "Sawing through this wheel
    will take time, and will obviously not look like innocent activity."
     
  11. The bike magazines tell us there's no way to prevent a bike from
    getting ripped off if a thief wants the bike. Anecdotal evidence
    suggests recumbents just don't get stolen by professional bike thieves
    because there's no immediate market for the bike. (Anyone from the
    insurance industry have reliable data? I've never seen anything
    specifically about 'bents.) No one wants the skinny little wheel off my
    TE and my mechanicals are deliberately not high zoot so I don't worry
    about the bike getting stripped. No, what I fear is random vandalism,
    coming out of a store and finding the frame trashed. No lock will
    prevent that. I have a Master Cuff at the apartment but I just carry a
    simple cable and combination lock around town.

    You could try searching the forums on Bicycling or Cycle Sport
    magazines for useful reviews of lock systems and each of the magazines
    runs a lock review every two years or so. The European mag, Cycle Sport
    always reviews interesting locks not easily obtained in the States.

    david boise ID
     
  12. Király

    Király Guest

    In rec.bicycles.misc Ian Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Have you tried it? It seems to me a bike wheel would be a bit tricky
    > to saw through. The rim is in moderate compression, and sawing
    > through things in compression can be difficult, because the sides of
    > the saw-cut grip the saw-blade. There's also the tyre bead to get
    > through.


    You and Sheldon are right about this, hacksawing a frame is much much
    easier than hacksawing a rim and wire bead tire. Locking just the rear
    wheel through the rear triangle is about as secure a locking method as
    one can use, when combined with securing the front wheel to the frame as
    well.

    > I think it would be easier to crop through the wheel,
    > assuming you can find croppers whose jaws open wide enough.


    Probably just easier to crop the lock itself.

    --
    K.
     
  13. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Fri, 05 May 2006 22:29:18 -0400, Freewheeling
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations about bike locks. I
    >had an Evolution Mini Kryptonite that got lost, and I'm wondering if I
    >should just get another one, of if there's now something better.
    >Looking for something that's both lightweight and secure. Or etwas anderes.


    Nothing much has changed in the past year. Cylindrical keys are still
    disparaged due to the ball point pen trick, and other types have
    replaced them. No lock will stop a determined thief, and cable locks
    won't even slow down even a casual thief. In general, light weight is
    less secure than heavy, according to the consensus of the NYC bike
    messengers visually surveyed; they carry those honkin' big Master
    locks and hardened chains. What's effective in your area can only be
    established by the kind of experience that you don't want to acquire.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
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  14. Gary Fritz

    Gary Fritz Guest

    Werehatrack <[email protected]> wrote:
    > No lock will stop a determined thief, and cable locks
    > won't even slow down even a casual thief.


    Got that right. My 10-yr-old had a cable lock on his bike, and lost the
    key. I took a pair of diagonal cutters (a bit larger than standard, but
    nothing industrial) and gnawed through the cable in about 10 minutes.
     
  15. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "Gary Fritz" wrote: (clip) gnawed through the cable in about 10 minutes.
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    Not only that! Based on my own experience, I'll bet people walked by and
    didn't even pay attention.
     
  16. Victor Kan

    Victor Kan Guest

    Leo Lichtman wrote:
    > "Gary Fritz" wrote: (clip) gnawed through the cable in about 10 minutes.
    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > Not only that! Based on my own experience, I'll bet people walked by and
    > didn't even pay attention.


    Why should anyone pay attention? There's nothing illegal about a guy
    cutting through a bicycle lock/chain on a bike he owns.

    If someone did pay attention, what should they do? Confront a potential
    criminal who is holding all sorts of dangerous tools, etc.? Or call the
    police, who won't get there until the guy is long gone?

    --
    I do not accept unsolicited commercial e-mail. Remove NO_UCE for
    legitimate replies.
     
  17. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Tue, 09 May 2006 00:33:45 GMT, Victor Kan
    <[email protected]_UCEloopdrive.net> wrote:

    >Leo Lichtman wrote:
    >> "Gary Fritz" wrote: (clip) gnawed through the cable in about 10 minutes.
    >> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    >> Not only that! Based on my own experience, I'll bet people walked by and
    >> didn't even pay attention.

    >
    >Why should anyone pay attention? There's nothing illegal about a guy
    >cutting through a bicycle lock/chain on a bike he owns.
    >
    >If someone did pay attention, what should they do? Confront a potential
    >criminal who is holding all sorts of dangerous tools, etc.? Or call the
    >police, who won't get there until the guy is long gone?


    Walk up to him in a 1950's British tropic-weight undress uniform, and
    slap him with a fish. An halibut, to be precise.

    What, you don't keep these implements at the ready at all times? No
    excuse!
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  18. Freewheeling

    Freewheeling Guest

    Victor Kan wrote:
    > DougC wrote:
    >> The handcuff one is made by Master; HostelShoppe for one place sells
    >> it for $75 or so. I just ordered one as I saw a lot of others said it
    >> was a good combination of easy to carry and easy to use.

    >
    > I got mine recently from amazon.com for $50 with free shipping:
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0009V1WQQ?v=glance
    >

    This sounds interesting, thanks. I bought a Bulldog mini for $25 just
    because I needed something right away, but it's pretty heavy for a mini.
    I guess that's the idea.
     
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