Question about first bike tune-up

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by skydive69, Oct 24, 2004.

  1. skydive69

    skydive69 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Messages:
    255
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have about 550 miles on my new Specialized Roubaix Pro. The bike is running flawlessly (I am meticulous with cleaning and lubing). At what mileage should a bike be brought in for its first tune-up even if it is running flawlessly?

    I ask this question, because I brought it in to the LBS with about 450 miles, and when I told him that it was running flawlessly, he stated, "If it ain't broke don't fix it." BTW, both wheels seem to be still in true.

    I am the pre-emptive type - I'd rather do something before there is an issue.
     
    Tags:


  2. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2003
    Messages:
    5,133
    Likes Received:
    0
    If it ain't broke, why -uck with it. Or maybe you have the... 'if it ain't broke, fix it till it is syndrome'? With current stuff, and cartridge BB, cartridge bearing hubs and HS, there is little to do anyway, outside of chain lube and slight derailer adjustment or wheel truing when NEEDED.
     
  3. ElPerro

    ElPerro New Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2004
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    I bought a Lemond last year, put 4,000 miles on it, and took it in for its first service recently when it began to shift a bit rough coming out of one particular gear. Needed a new chain and a new cassette, total bill around $175. As long as you replace the tires and brake pads as needed, and keep the brakes adjusted (all easy to do), I wouldn't be too concerned about getting it serviced until it indicates it needs to be serviced.

    Sounds like you have a good LBS.
     
  4. skydive69

    skydive69 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Messages:
    255
    Likes Received:
    0
    Makes sense - thanks guys.
     
  5. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2003
    Messages:
    5,133
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'd say you got a good hosing.
     
  6. ElPerro

    ElPerro New Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2004
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    .
    You've got that right, it's never going back there again. Supposedly he did a "tune-up" (whatever that means), lubed everything and replaced those two parts. Looks to me like he replaced the two parts, did a crappy job of washing it, and adjusted the brakes - which I had to readjust as he set them too tight.

    I was not pleased when I got the bill, but it just wasn't worth the aggravation of making an issue of it. It's just the typical New York City rip-off artists plying thier trade.
     
  7. jamesau

    jamesau New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2003
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    There are a few things I like to know are properly adjusted on a new bike, aside from brakes and deraileurs. These include:

    1) headset
    2) crankarm bolts
    3) chainring bolts
    4) wheel bearings
    5) stem
    6) wheel skewers

    Both my son and his friend bought (nice) new bikes recently; in both cases the crankarm bolts were way loose. Though at the time, 'it was running great', excessively loose stuff leads to premature wear.

    If you don't wrench yourself, have someone look it over.
     
Loading...
Loading...