Question about Huffy bikes

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by AmericanFlyer64, Feb 15, 2006.

  1. Yeah yeah, I know. I'm probably gonna take a pounding asking about
    Huffy's, but I'll take my chances. :)

    Does anyone know whenabouts the Huffy 441 series 10 speed bike was
    produced? I picked one up at a thrift store this afternoon, and I guess
    I'm just curious.

    I've been looking for a beaterbike that I can use for a 12 mile round
    trip commute to work and back. It cleaned up pretty well, and from what
    I can tell it's in pretty decent running order. All it needs (as far as
    I can tell so far) is two new tires and two new inner tubes.

    Any info will be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    AF64
     
    Tags:


  2. Rich

    Rich Guest

    AmericanFlyer64 wrote:
    > Yeah yeah, I know. I'm probably gonna take a pounding asking about
    > Huffy's, but I'll take my chances. :)


    Yea, you're right.

    On another note, I'd apreciate hearing back from you in a few months
    about how it held up.

    Rich
     
  3. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "AmericanFlyer64" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Yeah yeah, I know. I'm probably gonna take a pounding asking about
    > Huffy's, but I'll take my chances. :)
    >
    > Does anyone know whenabouts the Huffy 441 series 10 speed bike was
    > produced? I picked one up at a thrift store this afternoon, and I guess
    > I'm just curious.
    >
    >

    This site has serial number info:
    http://oldroads.com/hf_sn.asp
     
  4. innamaze

    innamaze Guest

    that huffy is a beater bike, it will beat you into a pulp!!! They use
    horrible low low end components, the wheels will not stay true, and
    their cranks are a joke, unless you are the one turning them, in which
    case you will not be laughing.....in order to be safe from lawsuits the
    huffy brand bikes have an enormous amount of weight added to the frame
    to counteract the pressed and pinch frame construction. Invariably the
    dimensions of the bike are not comfortable, but an average fit all
    design that doesn't really fit right. The bike will rust out before
    you know it if you leave it outdoors......go to a police auction, or
    ebay and get a real bike, you will be a better rider and happier person
    if you do....
     
  5. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    innamaze wrote:
    >
    > that huffy is a beater bike, it will beat you into a pulp!!! They use
    > horrible low low end components, the wheels will not stay true, and
    > their cranks are a joke, unless you are the one turning them, in which
    > case you will not be laughing.....in order to be safe from lawsuits the
    > huffy brand bikes have an enormous amount of weight added to the frame
    > to counteract the pressed and pinch frame construction. Invariably the
    > dimensions of the bike are not comfortable, but an average fit all
    > design that doesn't really fit right. The bike will rust out before
    > you know it if you leave it outdoors......go to a police auction, or
    > ebay and get a real bike, you will be a better rider and happier person
    > if you do....


    I put 8,000 miles a year on a Huffy, and current one since July 1998.

    http://home.att.net/~rhhardin/bike.jpg

    If someday enough components need replacement _at once_ then I get a whole new
    one.

    The wheels are spectacular at staying true, by the way, and under heavy loads
    half the time.

    --
    Ron Hardin
    [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  6. Pat in TX

    Pat in TX Guest


    > I've been looking for a beaterbike that I can use for a 12 mile round
    > trip commute to work and back. It cleaned up pretty well, and from what
    > I can tell it's in pretty decent running order. All it needs (as far as
    > I can tell so far) is two new tires and two new inner tubes.
    >
    > Any info will be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
    >
    > AF64


    Here's what to do: find out if your town has a program to recycle bikes.
    They are typically called something like "Spokes for Folks" or "Bikes for
    Tykes" or similar. These volunteer organizations pick up bikes and
    refurbish them and give them away. Now, mostly they give bikes to children,
    but they always have more adult bikes than they know what to do with. So,
    you can most probably give them a donation and in return get a mechanically
    sound bicycle. They will take the donation and use it to buy children's
    sized saddles and chains and new pedals, etc. It's a win-win situation.
    Your local police department may know how to contact these folks because
    typically they donate bikes to the program. Or, call a local bicycle club
    because their members would be the volunteers. Or, call a local bicycle shop
    because they typically give parts to the programs. I have gotten a Giant
    mountain bike this way and a Fisher mountain bike. Sure, they were made in
    the middle 1990's, but they have better parts on them and better frames than
    the typical Huffy bikes.

    >
     
  7. Paul Hobson

    Paul Hobson Guest

    Pat in TX wrote:
    >>I've been looking for a beaterbike that I can use for a 12 mile round
    >>trip commute to work and back. It cleaned up pretty well, and from what
    >>I can tell it's in pretty decent running order. All it needs (as far as
    >>I can tell so far) is two new tires and two new inner tubes.
    >>
    >>Any info will be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
    >>
    >>AF64

    >
    >
    > Here's what to do: find out if your town has a program to recycle bikes.
    > They are typically called something like "Spokes for Folks" or "Bikes for
    > Tykes" or similar. These volunteer organizations pick up bikes and
    > refurbish them and give them away. Now, mostly they give bikes to children,
    > but they always have more adult bikes than they know what to do with. So,
    > you can most probably give them a donation and in return get a mechanically
    > sound bicycle. They will take the donation and use it to buy children's
    > sized saddles and chains and new pedals, etc.


    Atlanta's SoPo Bikes is just just getting off the ground.
    Unfortunately, they have more kid's bike than they know what to do with
    despite the fact that their aim is to get low-income adults on bikes.

    For the OP: here's a link so you kind of know what to look for/what
    you'd be getting into...
    http://www.sopobikes.org/

    --
    Paul M. Hobson
    Georgia Institute of Technology
    ..:change the f to ph to reply:.
     
  8. Pat in TX

    Pat in TX Guest


    >
    > Atlanta's SoPo Bikes is just just getting off the ground. Unfortunately,
    > they have more kid's bike than they know what to do with despite the fact
    > that their aim is to get low-income adults on bikes.
    >
    > For the OP: here's a link so you kind of know what to look for/what you'd
    > be getting into...
    > http://www.sopobikes.org/
    >
    > --
    > Paul M. Hobson


    Our local group has a program with the schools to give kids bikes for
    perfect attendance. Also, they have another program with a local church to
    match kids up with bikes--but the bikes are in need of fixing. The kids
    learn to fix the problems and then get to keep the bikes. Also, they give
    bikes to kids at the women's shelters.

    Pat in TX
     
  9. innamaze

    innamaze Guest

    bless you for so many miles on a huffy, and since you seem to prefer
    huffy, then perhaps you do not know what a different, lighter,
    bettermade bike feels like when you ride it...you have been very lucky
    at having true wheels, unless you true them yourself, which might be
    the case since you ride so often.....I can understand financially
    having to get a bike within your means, and if the fact huffy is an
    American company tinges your decision, I can understand that, however
    trek and cannondale are two other American companies that offer
    homemade bicycles among major manufacturers. If you were to test
    ride one of these at your local bike shop, then you may understand what
    I am speaking of, and you may decide to find a used bike in your price
    range that won't beat your body as badly as that huffy, even if you
    don't realize what that bike has been putting you through.....
     
  10. Rich

    Rich Guest

    innamaze wrote:
    > bless you for so many miles on a huffy, and since you seem to prefer
    > huffy, then perhaps you do not know what a different, lighter,
    > bettermade bike feels like when you ride it...you have been very lucky
    > at having true wheels, unless you true them yourself, which might be
    > the case since you ride so often.....I can understand financially
    > having to get a bike within your means, and if the fact huffy is an
    > American company tinges your decision, I can understand that, however
    > trek and cannondale are two other American companies that offer
    > homemade bicycles among major manufacturers. If you were to test
    > ride one of these at your local bike shop, then you may understand what
    > I am speaking of, and you may decide to find a used bike in your price
    > range that won't beat your body as badly as that huffy, even if you
    > don't realize what that bike has been putting you through.....
    >


    Ron has 8000 miles on his Huffy. How many miles do you have on one?
     
  11. >>> Here's what to do: find out if your town has a program to recycle bikes.
    They are typically called something like "Spokes for Folks" or "Bikes
    for
    Tykes" or similar. These volunteer organizations pick up bikes and
    refurbish them and give them away. Now, mostly they give bikes to
    children,
    but they always have more adult bikes than they know what to do with.
    So,
    you can most probably give them a donation and in return get a
    mechanically
    sound bicycle. They will take the donation and use it to buy
    children's
    sized saddles and chains and new pedals, etc. It's a win-win
    situation.
    Your local police department may know how to contact these folks
    because
    typically they donate bikes to the program. Or, call a local bicycle
    club
    because their members would be the volunteers. Or, call a local bicycle
    shop
    because they typically give parts to the programs. I have gotten a
    Giant
    mountain bike this way and a Fisher mountain bike. Sure, they were
    made in
    the middle 1990's, but they have better parts on them and better frames
    than
    the typical Huffy bikes. <<<


    Huh, not exactly sure what that has to do with trying to find out what
    year a bike was produced, but thanks for sharing anyways.

    Just like to say thanks to all who answered. Some of the info was
    helpful, and some was insightful.

    Thanks again.

    AF64
     
  12. Pat in TX

    Pat in TX Guest


    >
    > Huh, not exactly sure what that has to do with trying to find out what
    > year a bike was produced, but thanks for sharing anyways.
    >
    > Just like to say thanks to all who answered. Some of the info was
    > helpful, and some was insightful.
    >
    > Thanks again.
    >
    > AF64


    You said you wanted a bike for commuting, and others said your old Huffy
    wouldn't hold up to that kind of riding. That's why I was trying to tell you
    how to get a better bike for not much money. Keep these comments in mind
    when your Huffy gives up the ghost. At that point, you won't care what year
    it was produced.

    Pat in TX
    >
     
  13. innamaze

    innamaze Guest

    I used to work for huffy as an assembler, so I know their quality,
    however I did see the pic of his ride and it is one of the better huffy
    offerings, and from the load capacity on the rear of the bike, weight
    is probably not much of an issue...as to my riding, I have 126,254
    miles on various bikes, currently a cannondale, but perhaps only 1000
    miles on a huffy type of bike...I followed my own advice
     
  14. Bill Baka

    Bill Baka Guest

    innamaze wrote:
    > I used to work for huffy as an assembler, so I know their quality,
    > however I did see the pic of his ride and it is one of the better huffy
    > offerings, and from the load capacity on the rear of the bike, weight
    > is probably not much of an issue...as to my riding, I have 126,254
    > miles on various bikes, currently a cannondale, but perhaps only 1000
    > miles on a huffy type of bike...I followed my own advice
    >

    I defense of Huffy, I bought one ten years ago for my daughter and since
    she did not ride it I did, and racked up well over 5,000 miles on it,
    all the while beating it to death on suicidal downhills and other not
    so paved terrain. My total cost was a bottom bracket that discharged
    all its bearings about 10 miles from home, a worn out bearing race on
    the rear wheel, and a quick disconnect front wheel that lost the entire
    spindle assembly when I wasn't looking. I managed to ride home by virtue
    of gravity, not pulling any wheelies that would have dropped the wheel
    and me. I did wear out the rear tire but that was to be expected.
    No complaints.
    Bill Baka
    Yes I am back, but only with facts.
     
  15. Bill Baka

    Bill Baka Guest

    Pat in TX wrote:
    >>I've been looking for a beaterbike that I can use for a 12 mile round
    >>trip commute to work and back. It cleaned up pretty well, and from what
    >>I can tell it's in pretty decent running order. All it needs (as far as
    >>I can tell so far) is two new tires and two new inner tubes.
    >>
    >>Any info will be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
    >>
    >>AF64

    >
    >
    > Here's what to do: find out if your town has a program to recycle bikes.
    > They are typically called something like "Spokes for Folks" or "Bikes for
    > Tykes" or similar. These volunteer organizations pick up bikes and
    > refurbish them and give them away. Now, mostly they give bikes to children,
    > but they always have more adult bikes than they know what to do with. So,
    > you can most probably give them a donation and in return get a mechanically
    > sound bicycle. They will take the donation and use it to buy children's
    > sized saddles and chains and new pedals, etc. It's a win-win situation.
    > Your local police department may know how to contact these folks because
    > typically they donate bikes to the program. Or, call a local bicycle club
    > because their members would be the volunteers. Or, call a local bicycle shop
    > because they typically give parts to the programs. I have gotten a Giant
    > mountain bike this way and a Fisher mountain bike. Sure, they were made in
    > the middle 1990's, but they have better parts on them and better frames than
    > the typical Huffy bikes.

    In a word, Bullshit. Huffy bikes are perfectly reliable, even if cheap,
    at least the ones made ten years ago. I can't speak for anything made in
    China except to stay far clear of it.
    Bill
     
  16. Rich

    Rich Guest

    Bill Baka wrote:

    > I defense of Huffy, I bought one ten years ago for my daughter and since
    > she did not ride it I did, and racked up well over 5,000 miles on it,


    Of course you had an odometer to measure this mileage, right?
     
  17. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    Rich wrote:
    > Bill Baka wrote:
    >
    >> I defense of Huffy, I bought one ten years ago for my daughter and
    >> since she did not ride it I did, and racked up well over 5,000 miles
    >> on it,

    >
    > Of course you had an odometer to measure this mileage, right?


    How many servers, transmissions and blenders in 5,000+ Baka Miles?

    Bill "he's back...aaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhh" S.
     
  18. Bill Baka

    Bill Baka Guest

    Rich wrote:
    > Bill Baka wrote:
    >
    >> I defense of Huffy, I bought one ten years ago for my daughter and
    >> since she did not ride it I did, and racked up well over 5,000 miles
    >> on it,

    >
    >
    > Of course you had an odometer to measure this mileage, right?

    Ten years of nearly daily riding.
    You do the math.
    Bill
     
  19. Bill Baka

    Bill Baka Guest

    Sorni wrote:
    > Rich wrote:
    >
    >>Bill Baka wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I defense of Huffy, I bought one ten years ago for my daughter and
    >>>since she did not ride it I did, and racked up well over 5,000 miles
    >>>on it,

    >>
    >>Of course you had an odometer to measure this mileage, right?

    >
    >
    > How many servers, transmissions and blenders in 5,000+ Baka Miles?
    >
    > Bill "he's back...aaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhh" S.
    >
    >

    No, just that the weather is so bad there is not much else to do.
    Irritating self righteous twits came to mind.
    If you are not of the above, you need not be offended.
    Bill
     
  20. innamaze

    innamaze Guest

    It would seem to me that blowing out your bottom bracket, rear wheel
    bearing race, front wheel spindle assembly hardly confirms the quality
    of a huffy....just re-inforces my statements as to the overall rather
    cheap manufacturing processes of huffy....now if you really want to
    have some fun with a huffy, go find and enter a good huffy toss....
     
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