question about making a headset press

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ant, Apr 28, 2003.

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  1. Ant

    Ant Guest

    i plan on making an upgrade to my homemade headset press this week. i went to an LBS, checked out
    their park tool,and plan on making the stepped piece that i imagine fits in the cup while pressing.

    as far as i can tell, theirs is made of steel. i was planning on making it out of aluminum, so it
    woudl be less damaging on the bearing surfaces. i imagine a shop tool would possibly be better out
    of steel because it will be used all the time, but mine will only see use once or twice a year.
    anyone see any problem with aluminum?

    second, the shop mentioned that often they dont use those stepped bits, but often just press in with
    the flat plate at each end. comments?

    finally, the model they have (im pretty sure it is the park, but could be wrong) looks like this one

    http://www.parktool.com/tools/HHP_1.shtml

    wiht the exception that the steps on their model are 1/8" deep, and the steps on the stepped bits
    (technical term) in this picture look
    1/2" or more. i plan on taking the outside diameter measurements from their tool, and plan on
    turning my own stepped bits (there it is again) to a long length, like the park tool pictures in
    the above link.

    am i on the right track?

    finally- how does one stop the bottom of the headset press from turning? if you are pressing a
    headset cup, and you are turning the top handle, why doesnt the bottom handle rotate with it? do
    these cups go in very easily so there is little friction?

    oops, just checked out http://www.parktool.com/pdf/parts/HHP_1.pdf apparently, they are called
    'stepped rings'.. next time.

    thanks in advance, sorry for the long post

    anthony
     
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  2. Personally, I don't see any reason to remove the headtube cup/cone until they wear out. But aluminum
    should be fine and, as you say, it would be less likely to damage toe race faces.

    You might even consider a piece of leather, like a gasket, over the spots that will contact these
    surfaces. Just a suggestion.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  3. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    [email protected] (ant) wrote:

    > as far as i can tell, theirs is made of steel. i was planning on making it out of aluminum, so it
    > woudl be less damaging on the bearing surfaces. i imagine a shop tool would possibly be better out
    > of steel because it will be used all the time, but mine will only see use once or twice a year.
    > anyone see any problem with aluminum?

    Aluminum or brass would be fine. An aluminum stepped ring should ideally have a bronze washer or
    something like that to serve as a bearing surface for the nut that drives it, although simply
    greasing this interface might be enough for the purposes.

    > second, the shop mentioned that often they dont use those stepped bits, but often just press in
    > with the flat plate at each end. comments?

    The important thing is that the shaft remain centered in the head tube, lest the cups press in
    askew. The stepped rings are an easy and reliable means to assure that everything stays centered;
    they are worth the trouble for a less-experienced mechanic or an unusually tight press fit.

    Chalo Colina
     
  4. Boyd Speerschneider wrote:

    > [email protected] (ant) wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > Here is a pic of my homemade headset press:
    >
    > http://web.tampabay.rr.com/darkstep/images/headset_press.jpg
    >
    > As you can see... its pretty high-tech ;) All you need is a 1/2" - 3/4" threaded bar, washers, and
    > nuts that fit it. You can pick up all of this stuff at the local hardware store for less than $10.

    Visit the local junkyard and pick up a carjack for the square threaded shaft and
    thrustbearing /Marten
     
  5. Ant

    Ant Guest

    [email protected] (Bluto) wrote in message

    > Aluminum or brass would be fine. An aluminum stepped ring should ideally have a bronze washer or
    > something like that to serve as a bearing surface for the nut that drives it, although simply
    > greasing this interface might be enough for the purposes.

    i had planned to make this washer that you mention out of steel, but brass would save me time and
    look prettier. would steel be advantageous? i thoguht that the turning nut would tear the brass up.
    coudl be in my head

    thanks for the advice, everybody. i appreciate the posts about simple presses, and the off-list
    responses, but plan on making the stepped rings as they wont take but a few minutes. no longer than
    goign to the hardware store, anyway, and i have the rod and nuts already.

    anthony
     
  6. Ant

    Ant Guest

    [email protected] (ant) wrote in message

    > thanks for the advice, everybody. i appreciate the posts about simple presses, and the off-list
    > responses, but plan on making the stepped rings as they wont take but a few minutes. no longer
    > than goign to the hardware store, anyway, and i have the rod and nuts already.

    For folks who might have been following this short thread, or pondering making their own headset
    press: here is my own version:

    http://pantheon.yale.edu/~aaa37/portfolio/bikes/framebuild/headsetpress.jpg

    the stepped rings are aluminum clones of the park tool, to .001 tolerance. the only changes i made
    was to add a smaller step that fits inside my 1" headset cups. (the park tool i measured didnt have
    this). i like the aluminum rings because they are softer than the park's steel, and i figure less
    likely to mar the cups. i figure park's are made of steel to withstand constant shop use. my own
    tool wont be used too frequently.

    outside the stepped rings are brass discs to function as either a bearing surface against the nut,
    or as plates to press in headset cups which don't work with the stepped rings.

    then, there is a steel washer, all on 5/8" threaded rod.

    at the bottom, there is a handle on a nut, which is locked in place with another nut with a
    smaller handle. so no wrench needed to lock it in place. all handles are covered in plasti-dip
    (great stuff!)

    the top has a nut with handles to provide the pressure.

    im pretty happy with it. if you have metal shop access, the whole project takes an hour and a half,
    and 15 dollars of materials. fairly good return, i think.

    cheers, anthony

    (many thanks to chalo colina for his advice on and off list, both for this thread and many past ones
    which dealt with machining processes)
     
  7. H. Guy

    H. Guy Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    (ant) wrote:

    > For folks who might have been following this short thread, or pondering making their own headset
    > press: here is my own version:
    >
    > http://pantheon.yale.edu/~aaa37/portfolio/bikes/framebuild/headsetpress.jpg
    >
    > the stepped rings are aluminum clones of the park tool, to .001 tolerance. the only changes i made
    > was to add a smaller step that fits

    gosh, that's pertty. wish i had one of those. and the machinery (and the skills) to make one. or the
    money to buy one of park's. parks's. parks'. whatever.

    i'll probably go to hell for admitting this, but i've always used two chunks of wood, a bolt and a
    couple of nuts to install the cups. and a length of pipe whose end is covered with electrical tape
    to install the fixed race. ya, i'm probably risking major damage to those fragile headsets they're
    making nowadays. but so far (knock on duraluminum) it seems to be working just fine. thing is, i've
    installed maybe 5 headsets total since i was born, so paying the $$$ for a tool?

    hg
     
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