Question about Saddles

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Galley22, Jul 8, 2006.

  1. Galley22

    Galley22 New Member

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    I recently just got into road biking in order to bike in competition in 2007. I bought a Felt 90 with a Felt Gel-Like saddle. In my first few rides I have experienced some problems with the horn on the saddle. It is causing great discomfort in the perenial region during the ride and for a couple hours after I finish the ride. I have done some research on the problem and have been told to...

    1) Get a longer horn on the saddle
    2) Get a shorter horn on the saddle
    3) Get a wider saddle so I position my sit bones on it
    4) Lower the saddle
    5) Angle more at less of an incline.

    Anyone experience similar problems and what did you do to correct said problems?
     
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  2. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    MY GF had one on her Felt, she swapped it off at the shop and now has a Selle Italia Gel Flow Ldy :) . I have her Felt Gel saddle on my bike.. :D The nose is a little down, but yes, you do need to be on the sit bones-gel pads for any saddle to work.

    I have a Selle Italia Pro Link Gel Flow on the try bike.
     
  3. Galley22

    Galley22 New Member

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    Thanks for the feedback. Ive been down working on the saddle for a couple hours and lowered it about a inch and a half. It took a little pressure off my groin just sitting there. When I go riding in the morning I am going to test a few new ways of sitting and positioning my legs to take some pressure off. If none of these work I will look into the two seats you commented on with a large sit area and more gel pads. Hopefully I can get this behind me and enjoy the sport a lot more... heh, pretty hard to throughly enjoy it with the nagging pain.
     
  4. buckybux

    buckybux New Member

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    I had the same problem with the standard Litespeed saddle. I have found the cut-outs, or at least those with a significant channel have helped a lot. I won't buy a saddle now without the cut-out or channel. Going with a longer nose won't help, you a place on the saddle where you can rest the pressure on the perenial region.
     
  5. Retro Grouch

    Retro Grouch New Member

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    An inch and a half? That's a huge, huge saddle adjustment! I think that anything over about 1/8 of an inch is a lot. If it's right, or close to right, now I can understand why it would have been uncomfortable before.
     
  6. Galley22

    Galley22 New Member

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    When I was fitted for the bike, the guy looked like he couldn't determine the right height on the seat. I am going to try many different heights, trying to work out the best height and if it will help the problem. If not than I will look into a new saddle.
     
  7. kleng

    kleng New Member

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    .

    Try the Competitive Cyclist fit calculator, this should give you some guidance on
    setting up the bike

    http://www.competitivecyclist.com/za/CCY?PAGE=FIT_CALCULATOR_INTRO

    , also the best starting point for a saddle is perfectly level, get a builders level and straighten it up, and try this before experimenting on angling it.
     
  8. Phill P

    Phill P New Member

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    I'm about to go on the hunt for a new saddle (the eternal search for the perfect saddle).

    Saddle height should be set for perfect leg extension, and fore aft for knee over the pedal etc. You should consider getting somebody with experience to check you out on a sationary trainer. It could make a lot of difference in your comfort and leg power.

    As for saddles you should be sitting back on the wings with your butt/sit bones taking the load. I changed to a specialized body geometry and it helped a lot, but like most people I find it a bit hard at times (depending which nicks I wear). I won't consider a saddle without the cut out down the middle now, and a nice flat top on it so I sit on the saddle not all around it!
     
  9. JohnO

    JohnO New Member

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    I went through four saddles before I finally found what I wanted. They were either too soft - got that uncomfortable squishy feeling after about an hour - or left me with sore sitz bones.

    Finally found two that worked for me: Selle TransAm, and Fizik Aliante. The Selle alleviated the sore bones, but you had to sit on it just right, as it had a fairly narrow sweet spot. The Aliante did the same, but I can move around a bit and not get sore. Neither was cheap - the TransAm was around $100, and the Aliante was $160.

    A good saddle is like good clothing, not the most glamorous accessory, but keeps you comfortable, and keeps you on the road.
     
  10. Ray Dockrey

    Ray Dockrey New Member

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    The seat I got on my road bike was horrible. When I bought my mountain bike the WTB Speed V Sport saddle it came with was instant relief. So I bought a Speed V Comp for my road bike and it has been perfect. I got it for $30 shipped to my door. I got the Comp instead of the Sport because even though they are the exact dimensions front, back, and length, the Comp is a little narrower in the middle of the saddle.
     
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