Question about USE Ring-Go-Star Headset Adjuster

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by puma, Mar 14, 2004.

  1. puma

    puma New Member

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    I've recently checked out this product (RING-GO-STAR WEBSITE), but I'm wondering two things. One is what exactly does this product do, is it suppose to take the place of a compression device/cap for steerer (why)? And the other is why does the collar/ring expand when I screw the allen bolt in. Am I suppose to screw the allen bolt in to expand the collar, then fit the collar on the steerer and then unscrew the allen bolt to tighten the collar around the steerer. Seems kind of odd, but I'm probably just confused.
     
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  2. lokstah

    lokstah New Member

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    I've wondered the same -- it looks like a clever innovation that USE has done little to explain very clearly.
     
  3. serenaslu

    serenaslu New Member

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    Looks to me like the Ring-Go-Star collar doesn't tighten around the steerer tube but rather just spreads vertically as the bolt is tightened. Basically doing the same thing the normal tensioner does but without clamping against the steerer itself; only applying pressure longitudally along the steerer between the headset and stem. Basically just two stacked rings with a bevel so that when the lower one is expanded it forces the upper solid ring upwards.

    Probably works best with John, Paul and George type headsets!!:D
     
  4. puma

    puma New Member

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    So it seems that I don't even need this device, I 've already got an FSA integrated headset with a compressor cap...which should suffice?

    Thanks for the replies.
     
  5. serenaslu

    serenaslu New Member

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    I would say that it doesn't add any capabilities over what you have, but is suppossed to be kinder and gentler to steerer tubes by not digging into them. Can't say that I have a good feel for whether this is really a big concern for carbon steerers or not.

    (hell, I still think that the threaded fork/quill format is a much better design anyways ;) )
     
  6. lokstah

    lokstah New Member

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    I think they claim it saves weight over the standard star washer system as well. If you look at their new (and sort of radical) Atom stem, for instance -- which is designed with an integrated ring-o-star -- they make a point of posting the unit's 120g equivalent weight, factoring in the gram savings from losing a star washer assembly.
     
  7. bestrin04

    bestrin04 New Member

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    The U.S.E. Ringo-Star has got to be one of the best innovations that has come out in the last year or so. It replaces the compression plug and reduces weight. They don't really need to be real detailed on how it works because it is pretty self explanatory. It works the best for carbon steerer tubes, and allows the headset to be easily adjusted. I have used many of these without any problems or concerns!!!!
     
  8. jasong

    jasong New Member

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    I can see how this avoids the star nut, but don't most carbon steerers require a compression lug (what is this called?) insert so that the stem doesn't crush the tube? It doesn't look like the Ring-Go-Star does anything to place something in the tube. And the lug is threaded so the end cap's bolt can be run into it to do the headset adjusting.

    For an alloy steerer, the star nut (a cheap $0.99 one) only weighs 15g. Not much weight savings there.

    I'm not seeing where this helps? For alloy, no concern and no weight savings. For carbon, you've got to have a lug anyway, so no weight savings.

    ???

     
  9. PSC

    PSC New Member

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    [You are right, I have the Ring-Go-Star on my bike and if you torgue down on the stem bolts it could crack the carbon steerer. Where I had my problem with is that the inside of my stem (Rithcey Pro) is hollow and if any of that hollow portion is sticking near/above the top of the steerer tube when you go to tighten the bolts the stem is "grabbing" everywhere except at the hollow point and the steerer doesn't get compressed there, and could crack. Mine cracked ever so slightly and I solved it by putting the plug back in as you said and have had no problems since. The crack was so small I don't really worry about it. BTW, I think it is a good product, you just need to be cautious when using it.
     
  10. jasong

    jasong New Member

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    Carbon really seems to be more trouble than its worth sometimes, doesn't it? I slightly cracked my seatpost with a poorly designed collar (and perhaps too stiff Ti seat tube?). The problem with these things is that you don't know what's too significant of a crack to no longer use the carbon component. Saving 3 ounzes max on the steerer and one ounce max on a carbon seatpost almost doesn't seem worth it. I can't see how vibrations suddenly enter this extension of an already damping piece like a good frame (Ti or carbon) or good fork (carbon), so the comfortability argument doesn't seem substantial.

     
  11. PSC

    PSC New Member

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    The crack was only a about 2mm from the top of the steerer at an angle down, and yes I did hear a light crack when tightening the stem. Why I am not concerned is that I looked at the whole steerer tube and could only see the damage at the very top of the tube. And to answer your question, yes I think people go to ridiculous lengths to lighten there bikes at the sake of safety. It's not the bike that goes fast, it's the rider riding it that goes fast. I think alot of people tend to forget that.
     
  12. aportteus

    aportteus New Member

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    Useful item for OSS Recumbent bikes with threadless headsets.Conventional design requires a star nut,then an extender,like the Delta Stem riser,then the Recumbent Riser with two bolt clamp & Bars. With the USE RGS,then a single bolt clamp,Recumbent Riser with two bolt clamp & bars. The weight savings is significant. Most OSS Recumbents are stuck with threaded headset & quills,this moves forward a generation in headset technology.
     
  13. PSC

    PSC New Member

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    I used one for about a year and my headset kept loosening up. Went back to a compression plug and have had no problems. To me it seemed like a great idea, it just didn't work to well.
     
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