Question for electrical experts



ritcho

New Member
May 24, 2004
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My red flashing LED seems to be chewing up batteries at a super high pace these days. The switch appears to be working (off means off), so I want to know if LEDs eventually wear out in such a way that they drain batteries faster as they age...

I get the feeling a new flashing LED is in my future

Ritch
 
ritcho wrote:
> My red flashing LED seems to be chewing up batteries at a super high
> pace these days. The switch appears to be working (off means off), so I
> want to know if LEDs eventually wear out in such a way that they drain
> batteries faster as they age...
>
> I get the feeling a new flashing LED is in my future
>
> Ritch
>
>


During the winter months, night becomes darker than in summer. It is
often called "dark night". Winter, coupled with the fact that Mars is
closer to the earth than it has been in 5000 years makes this Augusts's
nights some of the darkest ever. During "dark night", lights (LEDs and
normal globes) use more energy in order to penetrate this "dark night"
and provide the same level of visible brightness to other road users.
Come summer, your lights should stop chewing through batteries.

- Enojy.



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Just incase u thought I was serious.. this is a joke :p.
 
On Tue, 23 Aug 2005 22:56:00 +1000, ritcho wrote:

> My red flashing LED seems to be chewing up batteries at a super high
> pace these days. The switch appears to be working (off means off), so I
> want to know if LEDs eventually wear out in such a way that they drain
> batteries faster as they age...


There's no evidence that LEDs ever deteriorate or change if used within
their specs. Perhaps the flasher chip is damaged, or there's moisture
inside causing constant current drain.

--
Home page: http://members.westnet.com.au/mvw
 
ritcho said:
My red flashing LED seems to be chewing up batteries at a super high pace these days. The switch appears to be working (off means off), so I want to know if LEDs eventually wear out in such a way that they drain batteries faster as they age...

I get the feeling a new flashing LED is in my future

Ritch

Are you using rechargeable or common-garden-variety alkaline batteries?

Old/tired rechargeables or cold batteries could also be the problem.
 
Bikesoiler said:
Are you using rechargeable or common-garden-variety alkaline batteries?

Old/tired rechargeables or cold batteries could also be the problem.

Garden variety alkaline batteries. The unit is pretty old now, probably coming up on six or seven years, hence my initial question. Usually, a set of batteries would get me through most of winter, but now they're only lasting a few weeks (same usage pattern).

The moisture story seems like a possibility...

Ritch
 
On 2005-08-24, ritcho <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Bikesoiler Wrote:
>> Are you using rechargeable or common-garden-variety alkaline batteries?
>>
>> Old/tired rechargeables or cold batteries could also be the problem.

>
> Garden variety alkaline batteries. The unit is pretty old now, probably
> coming up on six or seven years, hence my initial question. Usually, a
> set of batteries would get me through most of winter, but now they're
> only lasting a few weeks (same usage pattern).
>
> The moisture story seems like a possibility...


If you have access to a multimeter, it might be worthwhile to check the
connectivity between the cell contacts. With the lights on steady, you
should be able to get connectivity in one direction only (ie: current
will flow one way, but not the other). With them off, there should be no
connectivity at all.

If current can flow between the contacts even when the lights are off,
you have your culprit.

Probably the easiest way to test this properly is to put the meter into
current flow mode, and hook it in series with the battery to the
terminal. Turn the lights on, it should work. Turn them off, there
should be no flow at all. (Maybe a *teensy weensy* flow -- I'm talking
two or three orders of magnitude less, if any.)

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