Question for those who have Joe Friel's book

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by sergen, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. sergen

    sergen New Member

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    I'm looking for a book that will allow me to train using a HR monitor (I cannot afford a power meter). My 'search' of previous questions seems to throw up 'The Cyclist's Training Bible' as a good training book for those using HRMs rather than Power Meters.

    Basically my aim in cycling is not to race but to be able to complete long distances (100 miles plus) at my own pace. As I would also like to improve climbing, most of my HR training thus far has focused on improving aerobic power and I have been training between 70-80%.

    Would it be worth my while purchasing the above book or is it a book primarily intended for those who race (and who therefore do mainly interval work at much higher Max HRs)? Given my goals in cycling are fairly simplistic, would Friel's book compliment these goals or would they be overkill for what I want?

    Many thanks
     
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  2. a5hi5m

    a5hi5m New Member

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    I have the book, and find that it is geared more toward racing, and setting up for a race season. The new(?)er edition does talk quite a bit about training with power, though it give some ideas about training with HR.

    As a newbie with a bike, and as someone who had started to "ride with a purpose" (training semi seriously), I found Chris Carmichael/Lance Armstrong Performance Program - the seven week one, gave me a fairly good starting point. It is pretty much based entirely on HR, and has a range of "entry level" training rides that helped me quite a bit. As you ride more, or get more information, you might find you "outgrow" this book though.

    I got some (and am sure I'll get more) nice info from Friel's training bible, and it has helped me get a greater understanding of training, which in turn has helped to me to decipher what gets written on this board.

    Of couse, after getting my bike in August, and racing my first crit in November, I'm well and truly addicted now, so my advice would be not to be surprised if your goals change ;)

    Just riding your bike more will help a lot with your goals, and you can probably (definately!) find a lot of info on these boards that can give you ideas about how to improve hill climbing, improving power at or just below aerobic threshold etc.

    Ash
     
  3. Woofer

    Woofer New Member

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    You don't mention the terrain or event or what your own pace is for these long distances or what you are currently capable of doing now. If you just want to complete 100 miles plus at your own pace, you really don't need any sophisticated training plan other than stubbornness and an awareness of your need to hydrate and replenish energy. Gradually increasing the duration and intensity of your training rides, try to ride three to seven days a week ( if less days, then harder intensity, higher duration spread out) to approach the duration of your desired event on perhaps one day a week and the pace or higher on others. Since you don't mention how much is in the plus, it may or may not be possible for you to replicate this in training rides on the weekend and definitely not possible on the weekdays unless you commute and have a very long commute. The main thing you might use the heart rate monitor for is making sure that you do not let your intensity fall too low, as there is very little benefit to training at a very low intensity even for long rides. For me, heart rate is a poor guide to this level of exertion using the HR guides from Friel or Polar et al but YMMV.

    If you are already familiar with tapering and intervals and the work/rest-compensation gain that most cycling training plans use, I don't think you will need the Training Bible, but if you are not, it can't hurt to learn his take on this.
     
  4. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    Overkill, IMO.
     
  5. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    You might want to pick up the book "Long Distance Cycling" by Pavelka and Burke. It's oriented to those who want to become century, double and ultra riders. Covers lots of topics in addition to training, like position, saddles, health, nutrition, etc.

    Also "ACE Training" (Altitude, Climbing, Endurance) for Cyclists by Dr. Arnie Baker is pretty good for training basics to prepare for mountain centuries. (those are my big events also). It's available as an ebook from RoadBikeRider.com.

    On the other hand, as guys have said, if you just ride the bike and get out with experienced riders, you'll build endurance and learn most of this stuff on your own.
     
  6. flipper

    flipper New Member

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    +1

    ...and I'll second dhk's recommendation of "Long Distance Cycling".
     
  7. Bobby Lex

    Bobby Lex New Member

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    ++1 for your stated goals.

    Bob
     
  8. 886014

    886014 New Member

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    I'm not sure getting out with experienced riders is the ideal way for someone new to the sport to improve, unless you find a bunch around the same level. In my experience I've found these rides tend to degenerate into practice races. It's much better to build a good base first before going too hard.

    As for the books, Friel's is very thorough. Yes it's geared towards racing but tries to form an understanding of why things are being done. At the end, you design your training plan. I think I have most cycling training books on the market, yet I refer to this one the most. On the other hand if you don't care for such things then Carmichael's book would do fine. I get a bit tired of his hype, and if he mentioned Lance Armstrong ONE more time ... :rolleyes: Just the same, it provides programs and says "do this and you'll get faster"; and you will.

    Good luck
     
  9. Synpax

    Synpax New Member

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    Uh.... well, assuming you are doing HR training you should probably buy the book by the triathlete who originated it - Sally Edwards - and she wrote one just for you:

    The Heart Rate Monitor Book for Outdoor and Indoor Cyclists: A Heart Zone Training Program

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1931382042/ref=sid_dp_dp/103-8946517-3544642?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n=283155
     
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