Question for those with a coach

Discussion in 'Power Training' started by buckhorn, Dec 20, 2006.

  1. buckhorn

    buckhorn New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2006
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am considering getting a cycling coach, but I am wanted to hear from a coach or someone who gets coaching first. My concern is that coaching works for people who train solely on the bike, and only do rides that a coach dictates. For example, I really enjoy the twice a week 80 min. group rides here that are fast paced (race pace?). I also like to run, swim, and hit some group excersize classes with some regularity. However, I do remember talking to a guy before one group ride last summer who I hadn't seen before, and he told me he doesn't get to come very often because his coach told him not to.

    My goal is to get stronger on the bike (I think I have a lot of room for improvement), and I know I can get there faster and smarter with a coach, but I don't want to give up the fun exersizes that I enjoy, and trade them for intervals and hill repeats solo.

    So how flexible are coaches?
     
    Tags:


  2. rayhuang

    rayhuang New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2006
    Messages:
    522
    Likes Received:
    0
    My coach says I am the boss, but that it doesnt work if he plans a week of low and high intensity and I go hard on an easy day and am not well rested for the hard days. Anyways-the point being my coach is flexible at least in the winter. I actually do hope hes very strict and pays very close attentio to what I am doing in the spring and summer, because if hes not I will feel cheated.


    FWIW-its also in our best interest that I be a happy rider and doing group rides or something fun instead of droning on and on on the trainer at specified power levels I think would burn me out long before racing starts.
     
  3. SolarEnergy

    SolarEnergy New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    Messages:
    1,503
    Likes Received:
    0
    I can't speak for the other coaches but I'm fairly flexible. My level of flexibility is partly function of your goals.

    I'll become stiff and strict if your actions aren't compatible with your goals (or vice versa).

    If you tell me you would like to qualify for the nationals in 3 years, but still want to spend a fair amount of time swimming and running, I might try to negociate to turn you into a triathlete :rolleyes:
     
  4. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2002
    Messages:
    3,866
    Likes Received:
    1
    If you let me know, then i can include whatever you want. On the other hand if your goals are X, Y, Z, and you like doing A, B, C which are 'bad' for X, Y, Z then i'd let you know it was 'bad', but if you still wanted to include A, B, C, then we would.

    Group rides can definitely be good (depending on your goals, fitness, and the level of the group), or they could be a complete waste of time. Best way is to ascertain what they're like with a power meter (to quantify the demands and how to fit it into your training).

    Ric
     
  5. fergie

    fergie Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2004
    Messages:
    1,924
    Likes Received:
    12
    When I was a personal trainer the client set the goals and I set out the training programme. If all you want to do is get stronger on the bike then ride the bike faster. If you have mixed fitness goals then you will need to incorporate different modes of training.

    Find a coach who is happy to work on your goals. I work with cyclists who have high performance goals (ie World Champs or Pro Racing). I am sure you will find someone who will help you achieve yours better than trying to figure it all out for yourself.

    Hamish Ferguson
    Cycling Coach
     
  6. Alex Simmons

    Alex Simmons Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Messages:
    2,471
    Likes Received:
    20
    Well I'm on both sides of the equation - I coach (a bit) and am being coached.

    In my view the coach can be exceptionally flexible as long as the expectations of outcomes (achieving set goals) are appropriate to the level of flexibility sought.

    That may take some discussion to begin with as some people's expectations of what's needed to achieve a goal might be out of step with what's probably required.

    I know that I need regular racing to stay motivated as that's what I enjoy doing the most. So with my coach I asked whether I should cut out this race or whatever and replace with specific training but in reality a happy rider most likely trains more anyway, so we incorporate what I enjoy into the routine. We treat many of my races as training sessions and balance of week's training takes that into account.

    Coach will/should say if it is detrimental to achieving the goal(s). In the end, it's the athlete's responsibility to do the work. The coach ain't gunna turn off the snooze button and go and pedal the bike for you.

    The choice is then yours as to whether you really want to achieve set goals or perhaps re-set them accordingly. You could of course get a second opinion on achievability.


    Ric is spot on - the power meter really, really helps as it provides concrete data on your on-bike workload and makes being flexible easier to manage.
     
Loading...
Loading...