Question of meat storage

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by LT, Jan 7, 2006.

  1. LT

    LT Guest

    My wife bought a couple of 3.5 lb rump roasts to cooked and served next
    Saturday. (family dinner) Question is should we freeze them, or will they
    keep for a week in the frig?

    LT
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    "LT" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My wife bought a couple of 3.5 lb rump roasts to cooked and served next
    > Saturday. (family dinner) Question is should we freeze them, or will they
    > keep for a week in the frig?
    >
    > LT


    Personally, I'd keep them in the fridge. Others might not. "Official"
    guidelines would probably to say to use within 3 days of purchase.
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-3-2006, Sam I Am! and Hello!
     
  3. "LT" <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > My wife bought a couple of 3.5 lb rump roasts to cooked and served
    > next Saturday. (family dinner) Question is should we freeze them, or
    > will they keep for a week in the frig?
    >
    > LT


    I've never had this issue since I usually cook the roasts the same day I
    purchase them, but I would check the sell by date on the roasts. I'm not
    sure how a roast ages while kept cool but I would probably wrap it well and
    freeze it. The irridescent sheen on a piece of beef is meaningless if left
    in the light. The beef is still good. Give it the sniff test first if
    storing it in the fridge for a week. This is probably not much help but
    check out the info here:

    http://www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com/aboutbeef/handling.asp

    Michael

    --
    Pics aren't great but here are 2 of my 4 brats.
    Hoot about to snatch the snack out of my mouth:
    http://tinypic.com/jtrw3o.jpg

    Ramsey ever curious about electronics breaking into the TMobile bag:
    http://tinypic.com/jtrwgn.jpg
     
  4. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 23:50:26 GMT, "LT" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >My wife bought a couple of 3.5 lb rump roasts to cooked and served next
    >Saturday. (family dinner) Question is should we freeze them, or will they
    >keep for a week in the frig?


    Cryovac'd, they'd last at least a week. Styrofoam and plastic
    wrap: Freeze them.

    -sw
     
  5. LT

    LT Guest

    Thanks.. my inclination was to freeze, so in they go,.

    LT
     
  6. "Steve Wertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > Cryovac'd, they'd last at least a week. Styrofoam and plastic
    > wrap: Freeze them.


    Some of the Cryovac packages have "sell by" dates that are a couple of weeks
    at least. I've never had a problem with them. Bought a leg of lamb last
    week and the date is January 20.
     
  7. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sun, 08 Jan 2006 03:35:42 GMT, "Edwin Pawlowski" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >"Steve Wertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>
    >> Cryovac'd, they'd last at least a week. Styrofoam and plastic
    >> wrap: Freeze them.

    >
    >Some of the Cryovac packages have "sell by" dates that are a couple of weeks
    >at least.


    Yep - that's why I said 'at least'. Usually it's much longer.
    Especially in the case of a raw (cured and smoked, but not cooked)
    ham - 2 months+

    >I've never had a problem with them. Bought a leg of lamb last
    >week and the date is January 20.


    Cryovac Rules! Seriously, it works well. Once it's open though,
    things deteriorate fast, which should be expected.

    -sw
     
  8. On Sat, 7 Jan 2006, LT wrote:

    > My wife bought a couple of 3.5 lb rump roasts to cooked and served next
    > Saturday. (family dinner) Question is should we freeze them, or will they
    > keep for a week in the frig?
    >
    > LT
    >
    >
    >
    >


    I'd freeze them.

    Elaine, too
     
  9. LT wrote:

    > My wife bought a couple of 3.5 lb rump roasts to cooked and served next
    > Saturday. (family dinner) Question is should we freeze them, or will they
    > keep for a week in the frig?


    They'll keep for about a week from pack date if done in the store. If
    cryopacked, they'll be good for about 45 days from pack time. If this
    takes it more than a couple days past the "sell by" date, I'd leave them
    in the packaging for maybe 4 days and then take them out, give them a
    quick rinse and put them in the fridge on a rack on a tray with a paper
    towel draped loosely over them. They'll dry-age a bit which will
    intensify the beef flavors.

    Beef will last about 3 weeks exposed to air (on a rack so air can
    circulate completely around it) before it dries to the point where it
    needs to be trimmed. It will run well over a month uncovered before
    spoilage proceeds to any appreciable degree.

    Pastorio
     
  10. Ophelia

    Ophelia Guest

  11. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    LT wrote:
    > My wife bought a couple of 3.5 lb rump roasts to cooked and served next
    > Saturday. (family dinner) Question is should we freeze them, or will they
    > keep for a week in the frig?



    I would freeze them, a full week in the fridge is too long.. and what
    if somthing untoward occurs that precludes their being cooked. And
    what did you plan for those two rump roasts, pot roast, or oven roast,
    or? Me, I'd leave the first two frozen and the day before your dinner
    buy two new ones... never frozen is always best, and this is supposedly
    for company.

    Sheldon
     
  12. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >> Pastorio

    >
    > Have you been away Bob, or have I just not been getting your posts?
    >
    > O

    I've been missing your posts, Bob. I was beginning to think I have you
    killfiled (by mistake of course.)
    I know you are not snowed in!
    Dee Dee
    Shenandoah Valley, VA
     
  13. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected].com...
    >
    > "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>> Pastorio

    >>
    >> Have you been away Bob, or have I just not been getting your posts?
    >>
    >> O

    > I've been missing your posts, Bob. I was beginning to think I have you
    > killfiled (by mistake of course.)
    > I know you are not snowed in!
    > Dee Dee
    > Shenandoah Valley, VA


    I think Bob was discovering exotics dishes :)
    Pandora
    Germagnano Valley (To)
    >
    >
     
  14. Meat spoilage rates...

    Why is it that beef, which has been aged, keeps so much longer (raw) in
    the 'frige than pork???

    I thawed a package of pork sausage about 4 days ago. It was in a sealed
    plastic "chub". The salt should have preserved it but when I cut the end
    off of the package today to use it, it stank to high heaven. :-( I had
    to toss it. The venison sausage I had thawed out was 3 days old and it
    was fine.

    I've found that, when I purchase pork steaks, chops or roasts, I either
    have to freeze them right away or use them within 24 hours, or they rot!

    I had a lovely (beef) round roast in the 'frige for 5 days and it did
    not even start to smell high. I had done some top round in chunks and
    marinated in soy sauce and it sat for 5 days also, and did not go bad.

    Chicken is usually okay for 2 to 3 days raw.

    Raw emu keeps for a good 10 days, but that is meat I process myself.

    What is the deal with pork? Is it the high fat content, or maybe just
    where I am purchasing it from???
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  15. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > Meat spoilage rates...
    >
    > Why is it that beef, which has been aged, keeps so much longer (raw) in
    > the 'frige than pork???
    >
    > I thawed a package of pork sausage about 4 days ago. It was in a sealed
    > plastic "chub". The salt should have preserved it but when I cut the end
    > off of the package today to use it, it stank to high heaven. :-( I had
    > to toss it.


    Fresh pork sausage does not contain anywhere near enough salt to
    preserve it, or you couldn't eat it... but just enough salt that it
    really doesn't freeze well, shouldn't be stored in a home freezer more
    than ninety days. It's 'ground' pork, with herbs, and it's
    pre-packaged chub mystery meat... that is by far the worst combination
    for long shelf life. You shouldn't leave even high quality, freshly
    made, never frozen fresh pork sausage, like from a specialty butcher
    shop, in the fridge more than two days before cooking... that
    defrosted crap you have shouldn't be left in the fridge more than 24
    hours at most... I wouldn't eat that, I wouldn't buy it, in fact even
    is someone bought it for me I'd toss that sludge in the trash. How can
    anyone think to eat that shit, it's far worse than canned pet food.
     
  16. Pandora wrote:
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> ha scritto
    >
    >>"Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >>>"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>>
    >>>>Pastorio
    >>>
    >>>Have you been away Bob, or have I just not been getting your posts?
    >>>
    >>>O

    >>
    >>I've been missing your posts, Bob. I was beginning to think I have you
    >>killfiled (by mistake of course.)
    >>I know you are not snowed in!


    We were "iced in" during the week before Christmas. I live on a farm
    with a long, hilly driveway (I can get my car up to 40 MPH on it) much
    of which is shaded and protected by trees. Snow builds up and becomes
    ice. The drive became impossible to traverse without special effort. I
    scattered 80 pounds of salt along the more icy parts of it just to be
    able to drive on it without sliding over the edge (the drive is partly
    carved out of a hillside - no guard rails).

    >>Dee Dee
    >>Shenandoah Valley, VA


    Yes. I drove past your exit of Rt 81 at a great rate of speed... <LOL>

    > I think Bob was discovering exotics dishes :)
    > Pandora


    I've been doing a lot of travelling in recent weeks. Virginia to New
    Jersey for a few days. Canada for several more. Back to New Jersey for
    still more and finally back to Virginia to recuperate from the "vacation."

    Made lots of things from gingerbread (posted a picture of my daughter's
    Eiffel Tower in alt.binaries.food). Houses, sleighs, gift boxes,
    ornaments. Created an igloo from sugar cubes and royal icing - never saw
    one, but seemed like a reasonable idea; worked wonderfully.

    I helped put together a rather over-the-top buffet at my sister's house.
    Did a stracotto di manzo al ginepro (braised beef with juniper), salmon
    in puff pastry, cream-based chicken stew and lots of other foods. Others
    did pastas, lamb, pork, desserts by the dozens, salads of several sorts
    and too many dishes to mention. I'm not going to need to eat until April.

    Pastorio
     
  17. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > Pandora wrote:
    >> "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> ha scritto
    >>
    >>>"Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>>>"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>>>>Pastorio
    >>>>
    >>>>Have you been away Bob, or have I just not been getting your posts?
    >>>>
    >>>>O
    >>>
    >>>I've been missing your posts, Bob. I was beginning to think I have you
    >>>killfiled (by mistake of course.)
    >>>I know you are not snowed in!

    >
    > We were "iced in" during the week before Christmas. I live on a farm with
    > a long, hilly driveway (I can get my car up to 40 MPH on it) much of which
    > is shaded and protected by trees. Snow builds up and becomes ice. The
    > drive became impossible to traverse without special effort. I scattered 80
    > pounds of salt along the more icy parts of it just to be able to drive on
    > it without sliding over the edge (the drive is partly carved out of a
    > hillside - no guard rails).
    >
    >>>Dee Dee
    >>>Shenandoah Valley, VA

    >
    > Yes. I drove past your exit of Rt 81 at a great rate of speed... <LOL>
    >
    >> I think Bob was discovering exotics dishes :)
    >> Pandora

    >
    > I've been doing a lot of travelling in recent weeks. Virginia to New
    > Jersey for a few days. Canada for several more. Back to New Jersey for
    > still more and finally back to Virginia to recuperate from the "vacation."
    >
    > Made lots of things from gingerbread (posted a picture of my daughter's
    > Eiffel Tower in alt.binaries.food). Houses, sleighs, gift boxes,
    > ornaments. Created an igloo from sugar cubes and royal icing - never saw
    > one, but seemed like a reasonable idea; worked wonderfully.
    >
    > I helped put together a rather over-the-top buffet at my sister's house.
    > Did a stracotto di manzo al ginepro (braised beef with juniper), salmon in
    > puff pastry, cream-based chicken stew and lots of other foods. Others did
    > pastas, lamb, pork, desserts by the dozens, salads of several sorts and
    > too many dishes to mention. I'm not going to need to eat until April.


    GNAM GNAM!
    >
    > Pastorio
     
  18. On Sun, 8 Jan 2006, Bob (this one) wrote:

    > LT wrote:
    >
    > > My wife bought a couple of 3.5 lb rump roasts to cooked and served next
    > > Saturday. (family dinner) Question is should we freeze them, or will they
    > > keep for a week in the frig?

    >
    > They'll keep for about a week from pack date if done in the store. If
    > cryopacked, they'll be good for about 45 days from pack time. If this
    > takes it more than a couple days past the "sell by" date, I'd leave them
    > in the packaging for maybe 4 days and then take them out, give them a
    > quick rinse and put them in the fridge on a rack on a tray with a paper
    > towel draped loosely over them. They'll dry-age a bit which will
    > intensify the beef flavors.
    >
    > Beef will last about 3 weeks exposed to air (on a rack so air can
    > circulate completely around it) before it dries to the point where it
    > needs to be trimmed. It will run well over a month uncovered before
    > spoilage proceeds to any appreciable degree.
    >
    > Pastorio
    >


    Might I add a caveat here without challenging the content of your post?

    Refrigerator temps are crucial in this process. The temps must hold
    constant. Home fridges are notoriously unreliable. Many are cooled by the
    flow of air from the freezer compartment, which can be hindered by an
    over-loaded freezer or fridge, excessive opening of either door, old or
    weak seals on doors, hindered air flow due to the way contents are stacked
    and or arranged, etc.

    A refrigerator thermometer is always a good choice and is an added safety
    measure, especially where raw meats are concerned.

    Elaine, too
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm not going to need to eat until April.
    >
    > Pastorio


    I know the feeling. ;-)

    Time to go hybernate eh?

    <lol>

    Welcome back!

    If you are so inclined, could you take a look at that thread on propane
    torches?
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  20. Elaine Parrish wrote:
    > On Sun, 8 Jan 2006, Bob (this one) wrote:
    >
    >
    >>LT wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>My wife bought a couple of 3.5 lb rump roasts to cooked and served next
    >>>Saturday. (family dinner) Question is should we freeze them, or will they
    >>>keep for a week in the frig?

    >>
    >>They'll keep for about a week from pack date if done in the store. If
    >>cryopacked, they'll be good for about 45 days from pack time. If this
    >>takes it more than a couple days past the "sell by" date, I'd leave them
    >>in the packaging for maybe 4 days and then take them out, give them a
    >>quick rinse and put them in the fridge on a rack on a tray with a paper
    >>towel draped loosely over them. They'll dry-age a bit which will
    >>intensify the beef flavors.
    >>
    >>Beef will last about 3 weeks exposed to air (on a rack so air can
    >>circulate completely around it) before it dries to the point where it
    >>needs to be trimmed. It will run well over a month uncovered before
    >>spoilage proceeds to any appreciable degree.
    >>
    >>Pastorio
    >>

    >
    >
    > Might I add a caveat here without challenging the content of your post?


    Like they say in the mustard commercials, "But, of course..."

    > Refrigerator temps are crucial in this process. The temps must hold
    > constant. Home fridges are notoriously unreliable. Many are cooled by the
    > flow of air from the freezer compartment, which can be hindered by an
    > over-loaded freezer or fridge, excessive opening of either door, old or
    > weak seals on doors, hindered air flow due to the way contents are stacked
    > and or arranged, etc.


    Agreed. With the understanding that fridge temps cycle. They go above
    the set temp which triggers the compressor to start working which takes
    the temp below the setting which turns off the compressor... ad infinitum.

    > A refrigerator thermometer is always a good choice and is an added safety
    > measure, especially where raw meats are concerned.


    Agreed, again.

    Pastorio
     
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