Question regarding blood disorders

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by jim, Dec 16, 2003.

  1. jim

    jim Guest

    What might elevated PTs and PTTs mean in the absence of any other blood-related anomalies, use of
    medications, etc? What problems would have to be ruled out? Thanks in advance.
     
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  2. Robert

    Robert Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
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    > What might elevated PTs and PTTs mean in the absence of any other blood-related anomalies, use of
    > medications, etc? What problems would
    have
    > to be ruled out? Thanks in advance.
    By blood-related anomalies what do you mean? All other coagulation tests normal such as D-Dimer?
    First you need to do a mixing study to determine if there are factor deficiencies or circulating
    anticoagulants. That test is called a 1:1 mix PT and or PTT. It can tell based on the correction
    studies which is the case. The age of the person is important as is a physical exam. Among the
    factor deficient category is decreased production due to liver disease or a consumption
    coagulopathy. You also have the malaborption people in here also as vitamin K is produced in the gut
    and is needed in the production of coagulation factor. To check for coagulation factor consumption a
    FDP or fibrin degradation product test may be performed. It can be used to detect clot formation in
    the body as in Pulmonary embolism. For circulating anticoagulants you have acquired anticoagulants
    such as Anti-phospholipid syndrome, the so called lupus anticoagulant and some cancer associated
    heparin like anticoagulants. There are other test to confirm these also. By far the most common are
    acquired factor deficiency ones.
     
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