Question to the knowledgeable.

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Scott Kuli, Apr 8, 2003.

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  1. Scott Kuli

    Scott Kuli Guest

    I weigh 280 pounds, and I'm about to get a mountain bike. Are there suspensions that will work for
    my weight? I was told by this one guy that his suspension can go (up to 600 pounds), and I doubt it,
    but it did seem very sturdy. I don't want to be riding around looking like I'm on a hybrid of a
    pogo-stick and a mountain bike just because I don't know what shocks to get...
     
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  2. Scott Kuli wrote:
    >
    > I weigh 280 pounds, and I'm about to get a mountain bike. Are there suspensions that will
    > work for my weight? I was told by this one guy that his suspension can go (up to 600
    > pounds), and I doubt it, but it did seem very sturdy. I don't want to be riding around
    > looking like I'm on a hybrid of a pogo-stick and a mountain bike just because I don't know
    > what shocks to get...

    When I first got my I-Drive, I was 285. The bike held up fine. My 6'6" 250 pound buddy has been
    riding (HAMMERING) an NRS1 for two years without problems. I'm now 220 +/- and riding a Giant VT1,
    with a Bomber Z1Fr on the front. Stay away from super light stuff, go for bikes designed to take a
    larger drop than you intend to ride. Choose forks based on leg stiffness, NOT light weight. Look at
    fully spoked wheels, with rims like Sun Ryno-Lytes. Stay away from low spoke count and composite
    wheels. Be HONEST about where you'll ride! Many riders walk around talking about the 3-5 foot drops
    they do, when most are actually doing 1-2 foot drops. <G> A 3 footer is over waist high for the
    average person!

    The guy that says a full bounce bike can handle 600 pounds has his head in the nether regions of his
    body. He's probabaly seeing the 600# printing on a spring and reading it as CAPACITY, when it's
    simply a 600# spring. Springs are rated for compression in pounds, with a 600# unit being about a
    medium stiff unit for most bikes. 800-900# is a stiff spring and 350# would be a light spring. Due
    to differences in suspension design, one weight of spring may not give the desired results on two
    different bikes.

    Barry
     
  3. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Scott Kuli wrote:
    > I weigh 280 pounds, and I'm about to get a mountain bike. Are there suspensions that will
    > work for my weight? I was told by this one guy that his suspension can go (up to 600
    > pounds), and I doubt it, but it did seem very sturdy. I don't want to be riding around
    > looking like I'm on a hybrid of a pogo-stick and a mountain bike just because I don't know
    > what shocks to get...

    First of all, are you talking about front or rear? Front suspension should cope with your weight
    with a bit of modification (heavy springs, different weight oil). Rear is a different story...

    You don't mention what you're willing to spend. 280 is kinda heavy, so you really need something
    robust - however, this will cost you. From a cost point of view, a hard tail (front suspension,
    rigid rear) will serve you much better, is less likely to fail and will weigh far less than a
    beefed-up full suspension bike.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I weigh 280 pounds, and I'm about to get a mountain bike. Are there suspensions that will
    > work for my weight? I was told by this one guy that his suspension can go (up to 600
    > pounds), and I doubt it, but it did seem very sturdy. I don't want to be riding around
    > looking like I'm on a hybrid of a pogo-stick and a mountain bike just because I don't know
    > what shocks to get...
    >

    Hi spring probably said 600lbs., that doesn't mean much of anything beyond what weight it takes to
    compress the spring if you were to sit on it with no shock or suspension linkage putting leverage on
    it. I think any freeride bike would be fine for you, like a Norco Atomik or Specialized P2. You will
    have to ask to have heavier springs put int he shocks but that's it. If you want a lighter XC bike
    you will have to choose more carefully.
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
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