Question: What spice is grown in Mexico?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Sheryl Rosen, Apr 22, 2004.

  1. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    Had to ask noisy neighbor upstairs to quiet down twice in 3
    weeks, most recently Monday. Kept me up and also the 85 year
    old, cranky landlady on the first floor. Neighbor's
    boyfriend is Mexican and he had relatives visiting from
    there a few weeks ago.

    Tonight, when I got home from work, there was a note sitting
    on my doormat, with a bag of some type of spice in seed
    form, with a note of apology, and that this was a "peace
    offering fresh from Mexico".

    It looked like Cumin seed, but it didn't smell like it. It
    smells vaguely familiar, but I can't place it.

    I will ask her when I bump into her again, but until then, I
    wonder if anyone knows what spices are indigenous to Mexico,
    that might look like Cumin but smell vaguely like anise????
    Any thoughts?
     
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  2. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BCAC826C.4BAC4%[email protected]...
    > Had to ask noisy neighbor upstairs to quiet down twice in
    > 3 weeks, most recently Monday. Kept me up and also the 85
    > year old, cranky landlady on
    the
    > first floor. Neighbor's boyfriend is Mexican and he had
    > relatives
    visiting
    > from there a few weeks ago.
    >
    > Tonight, when I got home from work, there was a note
    > sitting on my
    doormat,
    > with a bag of some type of spice in seed form, with a note
    > of apology, and that this was a "peace offering fresh from
    > Mexico".
    >
    > It looked like Cumin seed, but it didn't smell like it. It
    > smells vaguely familiar, but I can't place it.
    >
    > I will ask her when I bump into her again, but until then,
    > I wonder if anyone knows what spices are indigenous to
    > Mexico, that might look like Cumin but smell vaguely like
    > anise???? Any thoughts?
    >
    >

    Caraway? I don't associate it with Mexico but it fits your
    description.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  3. Puester

    Puester Guest

    Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    >
    > Had to ask noisy neighbor upstairs to quiet down twice in
    > 3 weeks, most recently Monday. Kept me up and also the 85
    > year old, cranky landlady on the first floor. Neighbor's
    > boyfriend is Mexican and he had relatives visiting from
    > there a few weeks ago.
    >
    > Tonight, when I got home from work, there was a note
    > sitting on my doormat, with a bag of some type of spice in
    > seed form, with a note of apology, and that this was a
    > "peace offering fresh from Mexico".
    >
    > It looked like Cumin seed, but it didn't smell like it. It
    > smells vaguely familiar, but I can't place it.
    >
    > I will ask her when I bump into her again, but until then,
    > I wonder if anyone knows what spices are indigenous to
    > Mexico, that might look like Cumin but smell vaguely like
    > anise???? Any thoughts?

    Fennel; coriander; pot....but I'd bet on fennel.

    gloria p
     
  4. Sheryl Rosen wrote:

    > I will ask her when I bump into her again, but until then,
    > I wonder if anyone knows what spices are indigenous to
    > Mexico, that might look like Cumin but smell vaguely like
    > anise? Any thoughts?

    My guess would be annatto. Crush one. Do your fingers turn
    brilliant yellow-orange? I'm looking forward to the answer.

    --Lia
     
  5. On Wed, 21 Apr 2004 23:59:07 GMT, "Peter Aitken"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:BCAC826C.4BAC4%[email protected]...
    >> Had to ask noisy neighbor upstairs to quiet down twice in
    >> 3 weeks,
    most
    >> recently Monday. Kept me up and also the 85 year
    >> old, cranky
    landlady on
    >the
    >> first floor. Neighbor's boyfriend is Mexican and he had
    >> relatives
    >visiting
    >> from there a few weeks ago.
    >>
    >> Tonight, when I got home from work, there was a note
    >> sitting on my
    >doormat,
    >> with a bag of some type of spice in seed form, with a
    >> note of
    apology, and
    >> that this was a "peace offering fresh from Mexico".
    >>
    >> It looked like Cumin seed, but it didn't smell like it.
    >> It smells
    vaguely
    >> familiar, but I can't place it.
    >>
    >> I will ask her when I bump into her again, but until
    >> then, I wonder
    if
    >> anyone knows what spices are indigenous to Mexico, that
    >> might look
    like
    >> Cumin but smell vaguely like anise???? Any thoughts?
    >>
    >>
    >
    >Caraway? I don't associate it with Mexico but it fits your
    description.

    Coriander?

    http://www.smithfarms.com
    Farmers & Sellers of 100%
    Kona Coffee & other Great Stuff
     
  6. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected]attbi_s51, Julia Altshuler at
    [email protected] wrote on 4/21/04 10:48 PM:

    > Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    >
    >> I will ask her when I bump into her again, but until
    >> then, I wonder if anyone knows what spices are indigenous
    >> to Mexico, that might look like Cumin but smell vaguely
    >> like anise? Any thoughts?
    >
    >
    > My guess would be annatto. Crush one. Do your fingers
    > turn brilliant yellow-orange? I'm looking forward to
    > the answer.
    >
    > --Lia
    >

    No, I know annatto, which are brick-red seeds. They turn
    anything coming into contact with them yellow-orange. (like
    lard, oil, rice, etc).

    These are brownish seeds, darker than the cumin seeds I have
    from Penzey's, with markings like cumin or caraway.

    I'll just ask my neighbor. I'm certain they aren't marijuana
    seeds. They are probably a type of cumin. Or a blend of a
    few things.
     
  7. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 01:49:39 GMT, Puester
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Fennel; coriander; pot....but I'd bet on fennel.

    That would be my guess as well. The logical thing to do
    would be to taste it.

    -sw
     
  8. On 22 Apr 2004 00:40:32 GMT, [email protected] (WardNA) wrote:

    >>Coriander?
    >
    >Can't be mistaken for cumin.
    >
    >I'm guessing it IS cumin, which is not indigenous to
    >Mexico, but is
    grown there
    >and widely used there.

    "Seed" was my noun. Cilantro and coriander are from the
    same plant.

    aloha, Thunder

    http://www.smithfarms.com
    Farmers & Sellers of 100%
    Kona Coffee & other Great Stuff
     
  9. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    >Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    >
    >I wonder if anyone knows what spices are indigenous
    >to Mexico.

    http://www.oaxaca-restaurants.com/spices.htm

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
    NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
    devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  10. Mr. Wizard

    Mr. Wizard Guest

    "Steve Wertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 01:49:39 GMT, Puester
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Fennel; coriander; pot....but I'd bet on fennel.
    >
    > That would be my guess as well. The logical thing to do
    > would be to taste it.
    >
    > -sw
    >
    The last time I tasted seeds that someone left at my door I
    was tripping for two days. They were "Wood Rose" seeds.
     
  11. On Wed, 21 Apr 2004 23:56:27 GMT, Sheryl Rosen wrote:

    > I will ask her when I bump into her again, but until then,
    > I wonder if anyone knows what spices are indigenous to
    > Mexico, that might look like Cumin but smell vaguely like
    > anise???? Any thoughts?

    Caraway or fennel spring to mind. Or even actually anise.

    --
    Tim C.
     
  12. On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 03:20:22 GMT, Sheryl Rosen wrote:

    > I'll just ask my neighbor. I'm certain they aren't
    > marijuana seeds. They are probably a type of cumin. Or a
    > blend of a few things.

    Cannabis seeds are completely different. Look in a packet
    of mixed bird seed . The hard, dark green/brown, roundish
    shiny ones.
    --
    Tim C.
     
  13. smithfarms pure kona wrote:
    >
    > On Wed, 21 Apr 2004 23:59:07 GMT, "Peter Aitken"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >"Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:BCAC826C.4BAC4%[email protected]...
    > >> Had to ask noisy neighbor upstairs to quiet down twice
    > >> in 3 weeks,
    > most
    > >> recently Monday. Kept me up and also the 85 year old,
    > >> cranky
    > landlady on
    > >the
    > >> first floor. Neighbor's boyfriend is Mexican and he had
    > >> relatives
    > >visiting
    > >> from there a few weeks ago.
    > >>
    > >> Tonight, when I got home from work, there was a note
    > >> sitting on my
    > >doormat,
    > >> with a bag of some type of spice in seed form, with a
    > >> note of
    > apology, and
    > >> that this was a "peace offering fresh from Mexico".
    > >>
    > >> It looked like Cumin seed, but it didn't smell like it.
    > >> It smells
    > vaguely
    > >> familiar, but I can't place it.
    > >>
    > >> I will ask her when I bump into her again, but until
    > >> then, I wonder
    > if
    > >> anyone knows what spices are indigenous to Mexico, that
    > >> might look
    > like
    > >> Cumin but smell vaguely like anise???? Any thoughts?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >Caraway? I don't associate it with Mexico but it
    > >fits your
    > description.
    >
    > Coriander?

    Coriander seeds don't look anthing like cumin seeds, but
    when ground they look quite similar. But since we're talking
    seeds here I would say fennel seeds. Look a lot like cumin
    seeds but smell a little like anise seeds.

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead
    already.” Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.” What if the hokey pokey
    really *is* what it's all about? mailto:[email protected]
     
  14. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BCAC826C.4BAC4%[email protected]...
    > Had to ask noisy neighbor upstairs to quiet down twice in
    > 3 weeks, most recently Monday. Kept me up and also the 85
    > year old, cranky landlady on
    the
    > first floor. Neighbor's boyfriend is Mexican and he had
    > relatives
    visiting
    > from there a few weeks ago.
    >
    > Tonight, when I got home from work, there was a note
    > sitting on my
    doormat,
    > with a bag of some type of spice in seed form, with a note
    > of apology, and that this was a "peace offering fresh from
    > Mexico".
    >
    > It looked like Cumin seed, but it didn't smell like it. It
    > smells vaguely familiar, but I can't place it.
    >
    > I will ask her when I bump into her again, but until then,
    > I wonder if anyone knows what spices are indigenous to
    > Mexico, that might look like Cumin but smell vaguely like
    > anise???? Any thoughts?

    Other than asking there is no real way to know - I would
    suggest you crush a few and then steep in hot water to
    release the flavor & smell.

    If you have some ideas you can click on the name here:

    http://www-ang.kfunigraz.ac.at/~katzer/engl/index.html

    Dimitri
     
  15. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], Dimitri at
    [email protected] wrote on 4/22/04 11:17 AM:

    >
    > "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:BCAC826C.4BAC4%[email protected]...
    >> Had to ask noisy neighbor upstairs to quiet down twice in
    >> 3 weeks, most recently Monday. Kept me up and also the 85
    >> year old, cranky landlady on
    > the
    >> first floor. Neighbor's boyfriend is Mexican and he had
    >> relatives
    > visiting
    >> from there a few weeks ago.
    >>
    >> Tonight, when I got home from work, there was a note
    >> sitting on my
    > doormat,
    >> with a bag of some type of spice in seed form, with a
    >> note of apology, and that this was a "peace offering
    >> fresh from Mexico".
    >>
    >> It looked like Cumin seed, but it didn't smell like it.
    >> It smells vaguely familiar, but I can't place it.
    >>
    >> I will ask her when I bump into her again, but until
    >> then, I wonder if anyone knows what spices are indigenous
    >> to Mexico, that might look like Cumin but smell vaguely
    >> like anise???? Any thoughts?
    >
    > Other than asking there is no real way to know - I would
    > suggest you crush a few and then steep in hot water to
    > release the flavor & smell.
    >
    >
    > If you have some ideas you can click on the name here:
    >
    > http://www-ang.kfunigraz.ac.at/~katzer/engl/index.html
    >
    > Dimitri
    >
    >

    Neighbor, boyfriend and friends were sitting on the front
    steps when I arrived home tonight and we had a nice talk.

    It IS cumin, btw, I asked her. Frankly, I prefer the
    Penzey's cumin, but this is nice too.
     
  16. On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 03:05:11 GMT, Sheryl Rosen wrote:

    > in article
    > [email protected], Dimitri
    > at [email protected] wrote on 4/22/04 11:17 AM:
    >
    >>
    >> "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:BCAC826C.4BAC4%[email protected]...
    >>> Had to ask noisy neighbor upstairs to quiet down twice
    >>> in 3 weeks, most recently Monday. Kept me up and also
    >>> the 85 year old, cranky landlady on
    >> the
    >>> first floor. Neighbor's boyfriend is Mexican and he had
    >>> relatives
    >> visiting
    >>> from there a few weeks ago.
    >>>
    >>> Tonight, when I got home from work, there was a note
    >>> sitting on my
    >> doormat,
    >>> with a bag of some type of spice in seed form, with a
    >>> note of apology, and that this was a "peace offering
    >>> fresh from Mexico".
    >>>
    >>> It looked like Cumin seed, but it didn't smell like it.
    >>> It smells vaguely familiar, but I can't place it.
    >>>
    >>> I will ask her when I bump into her again, but until
    >>> then, I wonder if anyone knows what spices are
    >>> indigenous to Mexico, that might look like Cumin but
    >>> smell vaguely like anise???? Any thoughts?
    >>
    >> Other than asking there is no real way to know - I would
    >> suggest you crush a few and then steep in hot water to
    >> release the flavor & smell.
    >>
    >> If you have some ideas you can click on the name here:
    >>
    >> http://www-ang.kfunigraz.ac.at/~katzer/engl/index.html
    >>
    >> Dimitri
    >>
    >
    > Neighbor, boyfriend and friends were sitting on the front
    > steps when I arrived home tonight and we had a nice talk.
    >
    > It IS cumin, btw, I asked her. Frankly, I prefer the
    > Penzey's cumin, but this is nice too.

    there are two main varieties that I'm aware of, the "white"
    which is really pale brown/greenish and look like fennel
    seeds, and the "black" which has narrower, dark, seeds that
    are slightly shiny, and are less aromatic. The cumin seeds
    only really develop their typical flavour when roasted
    slightly, I find.

    --
    Tim C.
     
  17. Sheryl Rosen wrote:

    > Neighbor, boyfriend and friends were sitting on the front
    > steps when I arrived home tonight and we had a nice talk.

    See how much better life can be when folks are nice to each
    other, Sheryl...???

    --
    Best Greg
     
  18. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], Gregory
    Morrow at [email protected] wrote on 4/25/04 1:48
    PM:

    >
    > Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    >
    >> Neighbor, boyfriend and friends were sitting on the front
    >> steps when I arrived home tonight and we had a nice talk.
    >
    >
    > See how much better life can be when folks are nice to
    > each other, Sheryl...???

    She was the inconsiderate one, not me. And you're one to
    talk.
     
  19. So what was the mystery spice???

    -John
     
  20. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 03:05:11 GMT, Sheryl Rosen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It IS cumin, btw, I asked her.

    Next time, just ask her before asking the whole world to
    take wild guesses.

    -sw
     
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