questions about being a slow runner

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by TerrySquier, Sep 16, 2004.

  1. TerrySquier

    TerrySquier Guest

    Hi, all. I used to run back in the early eighties and was running about ten
    miles a day at a 6:50 pace. In the late nineties I allowed myself to get out
    of shape by gaining up to around 240 pounds. In 2001 I had a heart attack and
    bypass surgery and subsequently lost about fifty pounds. I've been running
    again for about two years. In fact, I'm going to be running two half-marathons
    in the next month. I'll be 61 in November.

    However, although I feel great, I've now developed into a very slow runner that
    everybody passes. Most of the time I'm running my long runs of 8-12 miles at
    about a 12-minute pace. This seems very, very slow to me. The only time I can
    break a 10-minute mile is when I'm running hard doing half-mile or one-mile
    intervals. Sometimes I feel like I just should give up running even though I
    love it.

    Anybody out there that has a similar problem or can offer me some words of
    encouragement. I'd appreciate hearing from anyone. My email address is
    [email protected].

    Thanks, all. Terry
     
    Tags:


  2. Barf Bag

    Barf Bag Guest

    Dude, you are OLD, ancient, of course you're slow. Why give up? Because you're
    slow? That's the stupidest thing I ever heard. So are you a troll, or just a
    moron?
     
  3. timeOday

    timeOday Guest

    Don't try to be competitive if it sucks the fun out! I respect each
    person I see out there running, fast or slow, because unlike most
    people, they are doing something.
     
  4. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (TerrySquier) wrote:

    > Hi, all. I used to run back in the early eighties and was running about ten
    > miles a day at a 6:50 pace. In the late nineties I allowed myself to get out
    > of shape by gaining up to around 240 pounds. In 2001 I had a heart attack
    > and
    > bypass surgery and subsequently lost about fifty pounds. I've been running
    > again for about two years. In fact, I'm going to be running two
    > half-marathons
    > in the next month. I'll be 61 in November.
    >
    > However, although I feel great, I've now developed into a very slow runner
    > that
    > everybody passes. Most of the time I'm running my long runs of 8-12 miles at
    > about a 12-minute pace. This seems very, very slow to me. The only time I
    > can
    > break a 10-minute mile is when I'm running hard doing half-mile or one-mile
    > intervals. Sometimes I feel like I just should give up running even though I
    > love it.
    >



    I ran a 17:15 5k in high school, then got away from it for a long time.
    I've gotten into triathlons and was very slow, although I did complete
    Ironman Wisconsin last year. This year my focus has been on getting
    faster. I got a heart rate monitor, which tells me when I just *think*
    I'm working hard, so I know when I can push harder. I've also taken to
    doing treadmill runs, with a 5 minute walk at 15 minute miles. Then I
    start jogging at 12 min miles, bumping up 1 minute per mile faster every
    minute until I get to 8:00 miles. Then I do 20 minutes at a pace faster
    than 8 min/mile. I do this once a week, and every time I try to go a
    little faster. I've gotten up to 6:40 (or so) min per mile for 20
    minutes.

    The biggest thing in getting faster is varying your workouts. Run short
    and fast some days, long and slow others. Do intervals some days, tempo
    runs, etc.

    The most basic speed plan I've read about is the 1-1-1 plan: you run 1
    mile, 1 time per week, at 1:00 per mile faster than you usually do.

    Good luck! And don't forget, you don't need to get faster if you don't
    want to; if you're enjoying running, don't worry about it.

    --Harold Buck


    "I used to rock and roll all night,
    and party every day.
    Then it was every other day. . . ."
    -Homer J. Simpson
     
  5. Bear G

    Bear G Guest

    Don't compare yourself to where you were 20 years ago, compare
    yourself to your peers today. That's the people who had heart
    attacks and (if they survived) bypass surgery. How many of them
    are now running? How many of them are running half-marathons?
    You seem to be far ahead of the game even if your pace is slow.

    I'm in a somewhat similar situation. A year ago I was borderline
    obese and pretty much a couch potato. Today I'm preparing for a
    marathon in 9 days. I really don't care that I'm always among the
    last to finish in my marathon training group or that I'm routinely
    passed on the trail.

    Bear
     
  6. Tim Downie

    Tim Downie Guest

    "TerrySquier" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi, all. I used to run back in the early eighties and was running about
    > ten
    > miles a day at a 6:50 pace. In the late nineties I allowed myself to get
    > out
    > of shape by gaining up to around 240 pounds. In 2001 I had a heart attack
    > and
    > bypass surgery and subsequently lost about fifty pounds. I've been
    > running
    > again for about two years. In fact, I'm going to be running two
    > half-marathons
    > in the next month. I'll be 61 in November.
    >
    > However, although I feel great, I've now developed into a very slow runner
    > that
    > everybody passes. Most of the time I'm running my long runs of 8-12 miles
    > at
    > about a 12-minute pace. This seems very, very slow to me. The only time
    > I can
    > break a 10-minute mile is when I'm running hard doing half-mile or
    > one-mile
    > intervals. Sometimes I feel like I just should give up running even
    > though I
    > love it.
    >
    > Anybody out there that has a similar problem or can offer me some words of
    > encouragement. I'd appreciate hearing from anyone. My email address is
    > [email protected].


    Well, one option might be to forget these short distance races and join the
    ultra running fraternity. A 12 min pace can be quite respectable for a long
    distance event. Much more fun too. ;-)

    Tim
     
  7. John B.

    John B. Guest

    So what if you're slow? What bothers you about it besides the fact
    that people pass you? At your age and with your health history, you
    should feel proud that you're running at all.



    "Tim Downie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "TerrySquier" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hi, all. I used to run back in the early eighties and was running about
    > > ten
    > > miles a day at a 6:50 pace. In the late nineties I allowed myself to get
    > > out
    > > of shape by gaining up to around 240 pounds. In 2001 I had a heart attack
    > > and
    > > bypass surgery and subsequently lost about fifty pounds. I've been
    > > running
    > > again for about two years. In fact, I'm going to be running two
    > > half-marathons
    > > in the next month. I'll be 61 in November.
    > >
    > > However, although I feel great, I've now developed into a very slow runner
    > > that
    > > everybody passes. Most of the time I'm running my long runs of 8-12 miles
    > > at
    > > about a 12-minute pace. This seems very, very slow to me. The only time
    > > I can
    > > break a 10-minute mile is when I'm running hard doing half-mile or
    > > one-mile
    > > intervals. Sometimes I feel like I just should give up running even
    > > though I
    > > love it.
    > >
    > > Anybody out there that has a similar problem or can offer me some words of
    > > encouragement. I'd appreciate hearing from anyone. My email address is
    > > [email protected].

    >
    > Well, one option might be to forget these short distance races and join the
    > ultra running fraternity. A 12 min pace can be quite respectable for a long
    > distance event. Much more fun too. ;-)
    >
    > Tim
     
  8. bj

    bj Guest

    "TerrySquier" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi, all. I used to run back in the early eighties and was running about

    ten miles a day at a 6:50 pace. In the late nineties I allowed myself to
    get out of shape by gaining up to around 240 pounds. In 2001 I had a heart
    attack and bypass surgery and subsequently lost about fifty pounds. I've
    been running again for about two years. In fact, I'm going to be running
    two half-marathons in the next month. I'll be 61 in November.
    >
    > However, although I feel great, I've now developed into a very slow runner

    that everybody passes. Most of the time I'm running my long runs of 8-12
    miles at about a 12-minute pace. This seems very, very slow to me. The
    only time I can break a 10-minute mile is when I'm running hard doing
    half-mile or one-mile intervals. Sometimes I feel like I just should give
    up running even though I love it.
    >
    > Anybody out there that has a similar problem or can offer me some words of
    > encouragement. I'd appreciate hearing from anyone. My email address is
    > [email protected].
    >
    > Thanks, all. Terry


    I'm slow, & about your age (61 in Jan.). I'm also diabetic & a cancer
    survivor. I have no trouble running (jogging) at the back of the pack at
    maybe an 11min/mile pace -- and I haven't been "last" yet, though I've come
    pretty close. I recently came in ahead of an 80+yr man and a 9yr old girl.
    So what if they were the only ones I "beat"? I did the run, which not a lot
    of women my age can (though a number of them -- even several years older --
    can leave me in their dust).

    I really don't care how many people pass me. And some of them are even
    younger guys who go out too fast, whiz by me early on, & I pass *them* as
    they are *walking* later on! I've also been passed just before the finish
    line -- by a guy who apparently didn't want a female to beat him -- he said,
    as he went by, that I was his target; I knew it & told him so, but didn't
    care -- but if I'd had any kick left I sure would've used it after that
    remark!

    I'm not up to 1/2 marathon distances -- my most ambitions plan is a 10miler
    next month. If I crack 2hrs I'll be surprised. I seem to getting slower
    rather than faster over the past few months! And my training is limited by
    how much my body can take -- the legs/ankles/knees are only up to so much,
    though my lungs & spirit are ready for more. It can take several days for me
    to recover from more than 6 miles or so -- I have to cut back to walks.

    I know a man who is a few years younger than I am, has had a heart
    attack & is also diabetic; he runs about my pace or slower, and has done a
    couple of 1/2's. I think he uses a heart rate monitor a lot of the time. He
    certainly doesn't worry about coming in at the end.

    Just enjoy what you are doing, don't worry about "what people think" or
    about "what I used to do" or "what other people are doing". Run your own
    race or training, for your own reasons, in whatever way is comfortable &
    suitable for you. Even if it means taking walk breaks (but you can disguise
    some of those by doing them around water stations, heh heh!).

    Jogging around the neighborhood, I occasionally get jerk comments -- but
    I've never gotten any guff from actual runners either on the street or in a
    race. And the people finishing late in a race get cheers too -- the earlier
    finishers know how much effort it's taking!
    bj
     

  9. > Well, one option might be to forget these short distance races and join

    the
    > ultra running fraternity. A 12 min pace can be quite respectable for a

    long
    > distance event. Much more fun too. ;-)
    >
    > Tim


    http://www.dailywav.com/0602/timmy1.wav
     
  10. Dot

    Dot Guest

    TerrySquier wrote:
    > Hi, all. I used to run back in the early eighties and was running about ten
    > miles a day at a 6:50 pace. In the late nineties I allowed myself to get out
    > of shape by gaining up to around 240 pounds. In 2001 I had a heart attack and
    > bypass surgery and subsequently lost about fifty pounds. I've been running
    > again for about two years. In fact, I'm going to be running two half-marathons
    > in the next month. I'll be 61 in November.
    >
    > However, although I feel great, I've now developed into a very slow runner that
    > everybody passes.


    Could this be an issue of you going out too fast or starting too near
    the front?


    Most of the time I'm running my long runs of 8-12 miles at
    > about a 12-minute pace. This seems very, very slow to me.


    Well, it's a lot faster than me and longer distance, and I'm a few years
    younger without bypass surgery ;) And I don't let that bother me. I'm in
    it for the challenge and fun, not the speed. Your goals may be different.


    The only time I can
    > break a 10-minute mile is when I'm running hard doing half-mile or one-mile
    > intervals. Sometimes I feel like I just should give up running even though I
    > love it.


    If you run because you love it, why would you ever consider stopping?
    Forget about the watch and pacing.

    For some of us, running is much more than doing races. Some people run
    to race, and others, like myself, may do events to see different trails
    (and eventually other parts of state) or to see how well I can run the
    event (=well enough prepared to not be excessively sore for too many days).

    Also, consider your health history. Just being out there running is much
    more than many people do, even without bypass surgery. Don't expect
    6:50 paces based on your time 20+ years ago. Live and run in the present.

    And if you want to get faster (not sure if that's your goal or not), you
    can build long runs or add some fartlek or tempo runs as you're able.

    >
    > Anybody out there that has a similar problem or can offer me some words of
    > encouragement.


    Just keep keeping on! You've got your goals and interests and keep
    working towards them. Good luck!

    Dot

    --
    "Success is different things to different people"
    -Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope
     
  11. gentolm

    gentolm Guest

    i agree with DOT
    that is not slow ,,, i heard a guy interview another guy about getting
    his butt kick my a girl. I thought to my self i get my butt kick all the
    time in my races by other men and other women . so slow really is not an
    issue yet. hang in there, stay steady,there is someone always faster as
    there is someone slower
    poldzilla

    Dot wrote:
    >
    > TerrySquier wrote:
    > > Hi, all. I used to run back in the early eighties and was running about ten
    > > miles a day at a 6:50 pace. In the late nineties I allowed myself to get out
    > > of shape by gaining up to around 240 pounds. In 2001 I had a heart attack and
    > > bypass surgery and subsequently lost about fifty pounds. I've been running
    > > again for about two years. In fact, I'm going to be running two half-marathons
    > > in the next month. I'll be 61 in November.
    > >
    > > However, although I feel great, I've now developed into a very slow runner that
    > > everybody passes.

    >
    > Could this be an issue of you going out too fast or starting too near
    > the front?
    >
    > Most of the time I'm running my long runs of 8-12 miles at
    > > about a 12-minute pace. This seems very, very slow to me.

    >
    > Well, it's a lot faster than me and longer distance, and I'm a few years
    > younger without bypass surgery ;) And I don't let that bother me. I'm in
    > it for the challenge and fun, not the speed. Your goals may be different.
    >
    > The only time I can
    > > break a 10-minute mile is when I'm running hard doing half-mile or one-mile
    > > intervals. Sometimes I feel like I just should give up running even though I
    > > love it.

    >
    > If you run because you love it, why would you ever consider stopping?
    > Forget about the watch and pacing.
    >
    > For some of us, running is much more than doing races. Some people run
    > to race, and others, like myself, may do events to see different trails
    > (and eventually other parts of state) or to see how well I can run the
    > event (=well enough prepared to not be excessively sore for too many days).
    >
    > Also, consider your health history. Just being out there running is much
    > more than many people do, even without bypass surgery. Don't expect
    > 6:50 paces based on your time 20+ years ago. Live and run in the present.
    >
    > And if you want to get faster (not sure if that's your goal or not), you
    > can build long runs or add some fartlek or tempo runs as you're able.
    >
    > >
    > > Anybody out there that has a similar problem or can offer me some words of
    > > encouragement.

    >
    > Just keep keeping on! You've got your goals and interests and keep
    > working towards them. Good luck!
    >
    > Dot
    >
    > --
    > "Success is different things to different people"
    > -Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope
     
  12. gentolm

    gentolm Guest

    damn great comments BJ
    have you ever run the cowtown marathon??=)) are you sure you are not the
    one that kicked my *ss the 1st time i ran it ?? That was so
    depressing!!! you inspire my to put effort into my runs
    plodzilla

    bj wrote:
    >
    > "TerrySquier" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hi, all. I used to run back in the early eighties and was running about

    > ten miles a day at a 6:50 pace. In the late nineties I allowed myself to
    > get out of shape by gaining up to around 240 pounds. In 2001 I had a heart
    > attack and bypass surgery and subsequently lost about fifty pounds. I've
    > been running again for about two years. In fact, I'm going to be running
    > two half-marathons in the next month. I'll be 61 in November.
    > >
    > > However, although I feel great, I've now developed into a very slow runner

    > that everybody passes. Most of the time I'm running my long runs of 8-12
    > miles at about a 12-minute pace. This seems very, very slow to me. The
    > only time I can break a 10-minute mile is when I'm running hard doing
    > half-mile or one-mile intervals. Sometimes I feel like I just should give
    > up running even though I love it.
    > >
    > > Anybody out there that has a similar problem or can offer me some words of
    > > encouragement. I'd appreciate hearing from anyone. My email address is
    > > [email protected].
    > >
    > > Thanks, all. Terry

    >
    > I'm slow, & about your age (61 in Jan.). I'm also diabetic & a cancer
    > survivor. I have no trouble running (jogging) at the back of the pack at
    > maybe an 11min/mile pace -- and I haven't been "last" yet, though I've come
    > pretty close. I recently came in ahead of an 80+yr man and a 9yr old girl.
    > So what if they were the only ones I "beat"? I did the run, which not a lot
    > of women my age can (though a number of them -- even several years older --
    > can leave me in their dust).
    >
    > I really don't care how many people pass me. And some of them are even
    > younger guys who go out too fast, whiz by me early on, & I pass *them* as
    > they are *walking* later on! I've also been passed just before the finish
    > line -- by a guy who apparently didn't want a female to beat him -- he said,
    > as he went by, that I was his target; I knew it & told him so, but didn't
    > care -- but if I'd had any kick left I sure would've used it after that
    > remark!
    >
    > I'm not up to 1/2 marathon distances -- my most ambitions plan is a 10miler
    > next month. If I crack 2hrs I'll be surprised. I seem to getting slower
    > rather than faster over the past few months! And my training is limited by
    > how much my body can take -- the legs/ankles/knees are only up to so much,
    > though my lungs & spirit are ready for more. It can take several days for me
    > to recover from more than 6 miles or so -- I have to cut back to walks.
    >
    > I know a man who is a few years younger than I am, has had a heart
    > attack & is also diabetic; he runs about my pace or slower, and has done a
    > couple of 1/2's. I think he uses a heart rate monitor a lot of the time. He
    > certainly doesn't worry about coming in at the end.
    >
    > Just enjoy what you are doing, don't worry about "what people think" or
    > about "what I used to do" or "what other people are doing". Run your own
    > race or training, for your own reasons, in whatever way is comfortable &
    > suitable for you. Even if it means taking walk breaks (but you can disguise
    > some of those by doing them around water stations, heh heh!).
    >
    > Jogging around the neighborhood, I occasionally get jerk comments -- but
    > I've never gotten any guff from actual runners either on the street or in a
    > race. And the people finishing late in a race get cheers too -- the earlier
    > finishers know how much effort it's taking!
    > bj
     
  13. bj

    bj Guest

    "gentolm" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > damn great comments BJ
    > have you ever run the cowtown marathon??=))


    Hell no. I haven't even done that 10miler yet!
    And I'm having a few days "off" as I got too tired from doing too much/too
    fast/for too long. And, wouldn't you know it, we're having a nice stretch of
    lovely post-Ivan weather here!

    *IF* I crack 2 hrs for 10 miles, I'll be surprised!
    And I'll be even more surprised if a week later I crack 1 hr for 8k,
    considerin' how wiped out I get just doing a long (for me) training run!
    bj
     
  14. Rutabaga22

    Rutabaga22 Guest

    well I also run 11-12 minute miles. I don't think it's very fast, neither is
    it anything to be ashamed of. I'm 35-40 pounds overweight, 50 years old, a
    somewhat accomplished weightlifter but otherwise no real athletic background.

    remember that slogan from your youth, if it feels good, do it? Well, if it
    feels good, do it. cheers, [email protected]
     
  15. Barf Bag

    Barf Bag Guest

    >well I also run 11-12 minute miles. I don't think it's very fast, neither is
    >it anything to be ashamed of.


    I agree! All that matters anyway is how long you run for, not how far. You
    should be proud just to be out there doing something.
     
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