Quick Plug for Endura

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by MSA, Mar 10, 2005.

  1. MSA

    MSA Guest

    In my accident last December I managed to rip a hole in my Endura
    Thermastat longs. I repaired it with a needle and thread but over a
    short period of time it kept coming undone. Last Monday I emailed
    Endura asking if it was possible to have an off-cut of the material to
    do a repair with, this morning a 12"x24" piece arrived in the post.

    All I need to do now is work out how to do a decent repair!

    Well done Endura Customer Services.


    --
    Mark
    _____________________________________________

    Deja Moo - The feeling that you've heard this bull before
     
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  2. Paulmouk

    Paulmouk Guest

    "MSA" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In my accident last December I managed to rip a hole in my Endura
    > Thermastat longs. I repaired it with a needle and thread but over a
    > short period of time it kept coming undone. Last Monday I emailed
    > Endura asking if it was possible to have an off-cut of the material to
    > do a repair with, this morning a 12"x24" piece arrived in the post.
    >
    > All I need to do now is work out how to do a decent repair!
    >
    > Well done Endura Customer Services.

    --
    > Mark



    It's interesting how some companies are very helpful and others not so (or
    will charge the earth).

    I have a pair of Hebden Cord training trousers which I use for commuting and
    touring. I accept they are a bit pricey but mine look quite good after 6½
    years.

    And what service!
    I ordered mine with too long a leg length as I foolishly gave them my normal
    trouser length (down onto the shoe). They removed the zips redid the legs
    and posted them back to me free of charge.

    This year the outer part of the double seat wore through and I returned them
    for repair. Hebden Cord fitted a new seat and returned them to me, again
    free of charge.

    I will definitely be getting my next pair of cycling longs from Hebden and
    possibly my next shorts as well.
    Hebden Cord Touring Trousers.
    17-23 Oldgate
    Hebden Bridge
    West Yorks
    HX7 6EW

    Carradice have supplied me with canvas for patching a saddlebag and supplied
    new pannier hooks when mine wouldn't fit my pannier frame. (Both free of
    charge).

    However, Freestyle wanted £46.00 + postage (and didn’t say how much that
    would be) to shorten the sleeves on a jacket (new price was £150); and they
    curtly told me to make sure I washed it first. I saved that e-mail to remind
    me not to buy anymore of their products.

    Paul
    (Remove junk to reply)
     
  3. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "MSA" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In my accident last December I managed to rip a hole in my Endura
    > Thermastat longs. I repaired it with a needle and thread but over a
    > short period of time it kept coming undone. Last Monday I emailed
    > Endura asking if it was possible to have an off-cut of the material to
    > do a repair with, this morning a 12"x24" piece arrived in the post.
    >
    > All I need to do now is work out how to do a decent repair!
    >
    > Well done Endura Customer Services.


    If you do not have a friend who is good with needles (and I don't mean the
    local junkie or acupuncture specialist) look in the small ads for a
    seamstress -- a woman wot sews (in a non sexist, equal opportunities sort of
    way) or find a small place that advertises 'alterations service'.

    Such a person will patch your kecks far neater than you can and for less
    dosh than you would expect.

    T
     
  4. John Hearns

    John Hearns Guest

    On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 23:28:04 +0000, Tony W wrote:

    >
    >
    > If you do not have a friend who is good with needles (and I don't mean the
    > local junkie or acupuncture specialist) look in the small ads for a
    > seamstress -- a woman wot sews (in a non sexist, equal opportunities sort of
    > way) or find a small place that advertises 'alterations service'.
    >
    > Such a person will patch your kecks far neater than you can and for less
    > dosh than you would expect.
    >

    On this subject, I have a lovely Karrimor Eiger fleece,
    which needs a new zip.
    Its been that way for (ahem) a long time, and I asked a similar question
    on uk.rec.walking a long time ago.

    Anyway, anyone got ideas on a place which can do a decent job of replacing
    a zip? Would a local alterations place have the gear to do it?
     
  5. dkahn400

    dkahn400 Guest

    John Hearns wrote:
    > On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 23:28:04 +0000, Tony W wrote:
    >
    > > If you do not have a friend who is good with needles (and I
    > > don't mean the local junkie or acupuncture specialist) look
    > > in the small ads for a seamstress -- a woman wot sews (in a
    > > non sexist, equal opportunities sort of way) or find a small
    > > place that advertises 'alterations service'.
    > >
    > > Such a person will patch your kecks far neater than you can
    > > and for less dosh than you would expect.
    > >

    > On this subject, I have a lovely Karrimor Eiger fleece,
    > which needs a new zip.
    > Its been that way for (ahem) a long time, and I asked a
    > similar question on uk.rec.walking a long time ago.
    >
    > Anyway, anyone got ideas on a place which can do a decent job
    > of replacing a zip? Would a local alterations place have the
    > gear to do it?


    I can't believe you asked that in reply to Tony's post telling you
    exactly how to get the job done. A new zip is just a sewing job.

    --
    Dave...
     
  6. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    >
    > Anyway, anyone got ideas on a place which can do a decent job of replacing
    > a zip? Would a local alterations place have the gear to do it?


    Would the honourable member refer to the reply given earlier. Take it in
    and ask them.
     
  7. Paulmouk

    Paulmouk Guest

    "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 23:28:04 +0000, Tony W wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >
    > > If you do not have a friend who is good with needles (and I don't mean

    the
    > > local junkie or acupuncture specialist) look in the small ads for a
    > > seamstress -- a woman wot sews (in a non sexist, equal opportunities

    sort of
    > > way) or find a small place that advertises 'alterations service'.
    > >
    > > Such a person will patch your kecks far neater than you can and for less
    > > dosh than you would expect.
    > >

    > On this subject, I have a lovely Karrimor Eiger fleece,
    > which needs a new zip.
    > Its been that way for (ahem) a long time, and I asked a similar question
    > on uk.rec.walking a long time ago.
    >
    > Anyway, anyone got ideas on a place which can do a decent job of replacing
    > a zip? Would a local alterations place have the gear to do it?


    My local dry cleaners offer a repair service. They send them off to a local
    person.
    Jacket sleeve and trouser shortening, etc usually costs about a fiver. I've
    had zips fitted but can't remember the price. Twasn't much though.

    Paul.
    (Remove junk to reply)
     
  8. Steph Peters

    Steph Peters Guest

    John Hearns <[email protected]> of Customer of PlusNet plc
    (http://www.plus.net) wrote:
    >Anyway, anyone got ideas on a place which can do a decent job of replacing
    >a zip? Would a local alterations place have the gear to do it?


    The gear to do it is a sewing machine with a zip foot. All sewing machines
    have had zip feet available since at least my grandmother's 1927 vintage
    one, and probably as long as there have been zips. Anyone who can use a
    sewing machine can do it.

    This reminds me of an exercise at university in a class on the social
    aspects of technology. In a class of 40 only 5 people knew what both a
    drill chuck key and a sewing machine zipper foot were. Nearly all the men
    knew the drill chuck key, and nearly all the women knew the zipper foot.
    Interesting that 4 of the 5 who knew both were women. I wonder how many
    kids in a class of today's 16 year olds would know what a spoke key or chain
    tool is?
    --
    These settings will have no effect until you restart the system.
    Reset Universe (Y/N) ?
    Steph Peters delete invalid from [email protected]lid
    Tatting, lace & stitching page <http://www.sandbenders.demon.co.uk/index.htm>
     
  9. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Steph Peters" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > This reminds me of an exercise at university in a class on the social
    > aspects of technology. In a class of 40 only 5 people knew what both a
    > drill chuck key and a sewing machine zipper foot were. Nearly all the men
    > knew the drill chuck key, and nearly all the women knew the zipper foot.
    > Interesting that 4 of the 5 who knew both were women. I wonder how many
    > kids in a class of today's 16 year olds would know what a spoke key or
    > chain
    > tool is?


    I don't think I could replace a zip in a cycling jersey using a spoke key.
    Or if I could, I'd have a certain amount of difficulty with it ;-)

    Cheers, helen s
     
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