quill cinelli stem and fork stuck together

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by namg_engr, Nov 12, 2005.

  1. namg_engr

    namg_engr New Member

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    I have a cinelli xa stem and a specialized aluminum fork from a 1989 specalized Epic Allez. This assembly has not be taken apart for years and is rusted together. I tried everything from using wd-40 to hitting the stem with a rubber hammer and nothing will break the two free. Heat cannot be applied since the head tube is carbon fiber. An option may be to hack saw the stem to get the fork off and dig the rest of the stem from the fork - this may be the best solution. I'd really like a new fork since the fork probably has more rust than the stem and the clear coat is coming off the fork. these may be asthetic issues but a relatively new fork (and one that I can rely on) is important to me. I don't want to leave the assembly the way it is because periodic inspection of each part becomes impossible.

    Comments welcome.

    -Tom
     
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  2. cydewaze

    cydewaze New Member

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    Did you try threading the bolt in a few turns, then hitting the bolt with a hammer? Sometimes the wedge gets jammed, and doing this forces it down.
     
  3. namg_engr

    namg_engr New Member

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    Yes, the wedge is free but the parts are still frozen. I then proceeded to whack the top of the stem with a heavy hammer and a block of wood but the assembly still would not budge. I think at this point I'd prefer to cut the stem instead of risking damage to the top tube and bonded carbon joints.
     
  4. cydewaze

    cydewaze New Member

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    You mentioned it was a carbon fork, but what material is the steerer?
     
  5. namg_engr

    namg_engr New Member

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    The frame is carbon with aluminum lugs connecting the carbon tubes.

    I email specialized regarding replacement fork and they say...

    "I believe that frame had a 1" steerer, and finding a replacement fork may be difficult. Your local bike shop can help you find a fork that will work, although you may have to convert the head set to a "threadless" system."

    Their response is disappointing. I'd expected something more explicit. Well, what do I do now? My plan is: 1. cut the stem to pull the fork off the frame. 2. get the remaining piece of stem out of the fork 1" steerer to salvage the fork. 3. purchase a new quill stem and assemble the pieces.

    I will also go to my local bike shop and ask if they are aware of any replacement forks. Since I live in Morgan Hill CA, I'm tempted to go to Specialize factory and bang on their door.

    -Tom
     
  6. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    WTF did you expect them to tell you about a replacement fork for a late '80s frame? Or maybe you thought they had a few sitting on the shelf? People replace forks on old bikes all the time. It's not rocket science. Just do it. If the plug in the base of the cinelli quill will fall out the bottom of the fork, you can try pounding the quill out with a tool somilar to a park HS cup removal tool. Rather than being 'rusted' in there the old cinelli types with the expander plug will take a permanent wedged set against the side of the steerer tube. Practice removing quill stems rather than leaving them for 15 years.
     
  7. Insight Driver

    Insight Driver New Member

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    Sounds like you learned from the school of hard knocks. Good for you. Others have not learned, but that does not make them stupid. Good people try to help others with their knowledge rather than beating them on the head because they are ignorant.
     
  8. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Actually I have learned more by having to deal with others stupidity.
     
  9. John M

    John M New Member

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    Take a look at this discussion for some ideas. Your problem is not unique, but is the reason why the interface between aluminum and steel must be well greased.

    http://yarchive.net/bike/frozen_stem_remove.html
     
  10. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    Whats the problem?

    Cut the old quil stem, undo the nuts, throw the forks hedset and stem in the bin.

    Buy a 1" threadless carbon fork , half the tri-bikes in the world have them, have your lbs fit the new brearings, buy a new t/tess 1"-26mm stem, fit the bars and go man go.

    All the bits are here: http://www.pro-bikegear.nl/prosite/ they come from Shimano anyway.

    I just built a bkie with all 1" threaded forks, its just as easy. I can give links to 1" threaded CrMo if you like.
     
  11. namg_engr

    namg_engr New Member

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    Thanks for all who replied.

    I do have a NEW replacement quill stem on order through ebay. When the item comes I'll cut the old stem and try removing the remains from the steerer. If the fork (and steerer) is in good shape then I'll reuse the fork.

    My thoughts on Customer Service: I work in an industry where good customer service and providing customers solutions to their problems is paramount. Good customer service and helping them find solutions will retain customers. I'm looking to purchase a new frameset next year and haven't yet decided on a brand. I wasn't too suprised by Specialize's response, but sometimes you have to be persistant and talk to the "right" person within the company to get the needed information. The respondents to this forum have been more helpful to say the least. Yes, some companies do stock new-old-stock parts and it doesn't hurt to ask.

    -Tom
     
  12. namg_engr

    namg_engr New Member

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    Back Again,

    Here was the outcome. I decided to purchase a new fork. Luckily, I was able to fine a nice condition Kinesis 6061 Aluminum fork on ebay that was off a later vintage Specialized Allez for $15.00. Also I purchased on ebay a new Cinelli 1A stem for $30. After hacksawing my old Cinelli 1A stem, I removed the fork. From the fork, I removed the bearing seat and transferred it over to the new fork. The steerer tube on the new fork needed to be cut down so I did that with a hacksaw and cleaned up the threads with a file. The headseat was cleaned and the parts were put back together. The bike looks better now than before since the old forks clearcoat was peeling and chipping away leaving ugly tarnish marks.

    Lesson Learned: remove, clean and re-grease stem at least twice a year.

    -Tom
     
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