Quiznos UGLY Roadkill puppett



>Husband & I caught the commercial last night and decided those creatures we observed dancing around
>the sponsor's product were singing rats. Big, honking, ugly rats. Immediate, unanimous decision
>made never to even consider trying a Quiznos sub.
>
>NT

Yeah.... appetizing is not the word that commercial brings to mind!

BTW, while I think the sandwiches are okay at Quizno's the way they set the place up inevitably
leads to back-ups. One person -- and ONLY one person --- takes the orders. Then, a different person
--- and ONLY that person --- makes the sandwich, then another person --- and yes, ONLY that person
--- puts on the topping..... another for the drinks, another for the cashier. So, let's say 3
customers walk in at the same time. Customer A wants 4 sandwiches, Customer B wants 2, and Customer
C only wants one. While the guy on the register stands there and talks to the drink guy and the
toppings guy, the customer waits, because the toppings guy can't *possibly* put together a sandwich.
I once stood there for about 10 minutes, waiting to place my order, with over half of the employees
standing around talking. It was a bit frustrating.

Sheila
 
"WhansaMi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> >Husband & I caught the commercial last night and decided those creatures
we
> >observed dancing around the sponsor's product were singing rats. Big, honking, ugly rats.
> >Immediate, unanimous decision made never to even consider trying a
Quiznos
> >sub.
> >
> >NT
>
> Yeah.... appetizing is not the word that commercial brings to mind!
>
> BTW, while I think the sandwiches are okay at Quizno's the way they set
the
> place up inevitably leads to back-ups. One person -- and ONLY one
person ---
> takes the orders. Then, a different person --- and ONLY that person ---
makes
> the sandwich, then another person --- and yes, ONLY that person --- puts
on
> the topping..... another for the drinks, another for the cashier. So,
let's
> say 3 customers walk in at the same time. Customer A wants 4 sandwiches, Customer B wants 2, and
> Customer C only wants one. While the guy on the register stands there and talks to the drink guy
> and the toppings guy, the customer waits, because the toppings guy can't *possibly* put together a
> sandwich. I once stood there for about 10 minutes, waiting to place my
order,
> with over half of the employees standing around talking. It was a bit frustrating.
>
> Sheila

I completely agree. We just got a Quiznos here in Lahaina about a year ago. I've been there twice
and the service was *lousy* at BEST. I got a sub the first time, took it back to work, finished it
in 4 bites - $8.00. The second time I got a salad. They were out of cheese. They were out of
croutons. 15 minutes and $8.00 later, I had a salad, but nothing that a $5.00 Jack In The Box salad
wouldn't win in a competition.

kili
 
[email protected] (BillKirch) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> >Preferring Erbert's & Gerbert's
> >
>
> ##############
> Like we know what that is. BG

OK - They're not "first rate" but they're a helluva lot better than you'd expect from that gopher
thingy. Erberts and Gerverts is semi local - I think they have stores in Mpls/StPaul. They have
wonderful bread - like real French baguettes - soft on the insede wonderful chewy crust. My favorite
is a roast beef/provolone/tomato/lettuce/onion/avocado thing. Fargo is not a restaurant town -
except that we have one of (almost) every chain ever established. What we DO have is ethnic markets:
2 African, 2 Bosnian, 1 Hispanic, 3 Asian (one Cambodian, one Korean and one Vietnamese) and 1
Middle Eastern. Have I mentioned that we have a LOT of refugees? ;-)

Lynn (not starving in) Fargo.
 
>he way they set the place up inevitably leads to back-ups.

>Then, a different person --- and ONLY that person --- makes the sandwich, then another person ---
>and yes, ONLY that person --- puts on the topping.....

> I once stood there for about 10 minutes, waiting to place my order, with over half of the
> employees standing around talking. It was a bit frustrating.

#############
I totally agree. The place is set up badly and the have only about 8-9 inches of depth work space to
work in. Also I got into a argument with a girl once about me NOT wanting my sandwhich toasted. She
INSISTED I have it toasted. I'd rather go to TOGOS. BG
 
BillKirch wrote:
>
> >The second time I got a salad. They were out of cheese. They were out of croutons.
>
> #################
> I HATE IT when I go to a restaurant and they say "we're out of_______ ". I always say..."then GO
> GET SOME'. Send someone out to go get some ya dumb twit. I was once told by an Italian restaurant"
> they were out of butter....sorry" I said then...go get some at that grocery store right out side
> the window that was 60 feet away. How stupid. BG

Out of BUTTER? That's ridiculous. When I run out of butter, I go to the store and get more, why
can't they? I understand it's not their usual distributor, but keep that up and I'm not going to be
your usual customer.

This sub shop I like used to run out of sub rolls often. Hello, you sell subs!!! I mean, honestly,
maybe once I could see that happening, but all the time? They seem to have figured it out since
then, and they still make very good subs.

nancy
 
Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
[restaurants running out of basics and refusing to replace them]
> Out of BUTTER? That's ridiculous.

Not to discredit that buffoon but I have only seen the olive oil dip at Italian restaurants (from up
and down the PRC's coast to the mom-n-pop place in Pitt, PA). The only time something different was
offered is in a local restaurant; they have a cheese spread for their bread that I find obnoxious.

> When I run out of butter, I go to the store and get more, why can't they? [..]

It's as simple as food costs. If they simply replaced a non-essential every time they ran out, the
cost -- directly to the restaurant -- would add up very quickly and they would either have to raise
prices or end up going out of business.

Now, I'm not saying that running a home is no less important on maintaining costs but you aren't
buying (those few extreme instances ignored) in similar volumes that will syphon your accounts
weekly. The restaurant also might've placed an order that will be shipped quickly and is awaiting
that order. It's a judgement call on the manager's/owner's part; they're rolling the dice that no
one will ask, or it will be such an a small number that they can apologize and move on.

> This sub shop I like used to run out of sub rolls often. [..]

This can be a problem for many businesses. Bread goes bad quickly so you don't want to stock a lot
of it. You hope that the vendor's schedule matches your sales, there will be little left over, and
that none of it spoils. A good [bread] vendor has someone that helps you with your ordering.

I'm glad your sub place has figured it out, though. Sounds like inexperience from the manager and
customers that were willing to wait while s/he figured out the proper number...

The Ranger
 
The Ranger wrote:
>
> Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote in message

> [restaurants running out of basics and refusing to replace them]
> > Out of BUTTER? That's ridiculous.

> > When I run out of butter, I go to the store and get more, why can't they? [..]
>
> It's as simple as food costs. If they simply replaced a non-essential every time they ran out, the
> cost -- directly to the restaurant -- would add up very quickly and they would either have to
> raise prices or end up going out of business.

Yeah, but it's not non-essential to me. It's not like asking, oh, can I have some caviar with my
bread. Butter. Plus, it freezes so well, even here at home I never run out, it's a major misstep on
someone's part in the restaurant to allow that to happen. Sorry if I'm not making my point. Really,
someone screwed up and they should go out and pick up a pound of butter.

> Now, I'm not saying that running a home is no less important on maintaining costs but you aren't
> buying (those few extreme instances ignored) in similar volumes that will syphon your accounts
> weekly. The restaurant also might've placed an order that will be shipped quickly and is awaiting
> that order. It's a judgement call on the manager's/owner's part; they're rolling the dice that no
> one will ask, or it will be such an a small number that they can apologize and move on.

Yeah, I just think in the interest of the customers, someone could drop a couple of bucks for some
butter to tide them over.

> > This sub shop I like used to run out of sub rolls often. [..]
>
> This can be a problem for many businesses. Bread goes bad quickly so you don't want to stock a lot
> of it. You hope that the vendor's schedule matches your sales, there will be little left over, and
> that none of it spoils. A good [bread] vendor has someone that helps you with your ordering.

Oh, I completely get that, they try not to order too much bread, and I'm sure they get deliveries
every morning/whatever. But, really, when your shop is named Joyce's Sub Shop, you need enough rolls
to get through the day. When it gets to the point where you run out of sub rolls all the time, you
need to up your order.

> I'm glad your sub place has figured it out, though. Sounds like inexperience from the manager and
> customers that were willing to wait while s/he figured out the proper number...

That's the funny thing, place has been around forever, it's not a little start up. I think perhaps
someone bought them out, because they closed for the longest time for renovations. What they were
doing, I can't imagine, because the store might be 20 wide by 70 long, half of it kitchen. I'm
talking a little sub shop. (laugh) You think I would get kicked out if I brought over a tape measure
and checked the place out?

nancy
 
Nancy Young <[email protected]> followed up in message
news:[email protected]...
> The Ranger wrote:
> >
> > Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote in message

> > [restaurants running out of basics and refusing to replace them]
> > > Out of BUTTER? That's ridiculous.

> > > When I run out of butter, I go to the store and get more, why can't they? [..]

> > It's as simple as food costs. If they simply replaced a non-essential every time they ran out,
> > the cost -- directly to the restaurant -- would add up very quickly and they would either have
> > to raise prices or end up going out of business.

> Yeah, but it's not non-essential to me. It's not like asking, oh, can I have some caviar with my
> bread. Butter. Plus, it freezes so well, even here at home I never run out, it's a major misstep
> on someone's part in the restaurant to allow that to happen. Sorry if I'm not making my point.
> Really, someone screwed up and they should go out and pick up a pound of butter.

Again, it's HIGHLY dependent on whether this product is a normal item in the restaurant. I can't
remember ever being offered butter as a bread-spread in an Italian restaurant so you might as well
be asking for caviar. <G> And, as bad as this sounds, if you are the lone customer that needs butter
with their bread, you've got to be a regular before any manager will spend petty cash (and around my
geography butter retails for $3.99 on sale to $5.25 per pound) on such an extravagance. And freezing
a minor purchase like butter isn't an option usually; things get "lost" when you don't use them
regularly.

> > Now, I'm not saying that running a home is no less important on maintaining costs but you
> > aren't buying (those few extreme instances ignored) in similar volumes that will syphon your
> > accounts weekly. The restaurant also might've placed an order that will be shipped quickly and
> > is awaiting that order. It's a judgement call on the manager's/owner's part; they're rolling
> > the dice that no one will ask, or it will be such an a small number that they can apologize and
> > move on.

> Yeah, I just think in the interest of the customers, someone could drop a couple of bucks for some
> butter to tide them over.

I don't know of one server that would willingly do this -- even if it netted them a higher tip.
Servers are mercenaries which makes them very predictable. Besides, even the most minor petty cash
expenditures are pre-approved by a manager. That's when you send them out to the table to handle the
complaint.

> > > This sub shop I like used to run out of sub rolls often. [..]

> > This can be a problem for many businesses. Bread goes bad quickly so you don't want to stock a
> > lot of it. You hope that the vendor's schedule matches your sales, there will be little left
> > over, and that none of it spoils. A good [bread] vendor has someone that helps you with your
> > ordering.

> Oh, I completely get that, they try not to order too much bread, and I'm sure they get deliveries
> every morning/whatever. But, really, when your shop is named Joyce's Sub Shop, you need enough
> rolls to get through the day. When it gets to the point where you run out of sub rolls all the
> time, you need to up your order.

Yep; without a doubt good -- consistent -- ordering of basics is a key ingredient to successful
restaurants. It's also one of those areas that gets the least attention from managers.

> > I'm glad your sub place has figured it out, though. Sounds like inexperience from the manager
> > and customers that were willing to wait while s/he figured out the proper number...

> That's the funny thing, place has been around forever, it's not a little start up. I think perhaps
> someone bought them out, because they closed for the longest time for renovations. What they were
> doing, I can't imagine, because the store might be 20 wide by 70 long, half of it kitchen. I'm
> talking a little sub shop.

The more details you provide, the more I'm convinced it was a combination of storage-plus-experience
problem. I know that storage in the back area was prime real estate in every restaurant I worked in
lo-that-other-life. In one restaurant, our sales skyrocketted and we ended up having to order 3 6'-
tall 10-tray tower-racks for our bread (which was delivered MWFS). Saturday ordering was difficult
because storage didn't allow another tower but our bread useage was easily another 80 loaves (and
this didn't include the five _other_ minor types we stocked.) Eventually, working with the vendor,
we found a solution but there were some Sundays I'd come in and immediately start praying for no
customers...

> (laugh) You think I would get kicked out if I brought over a tape measure and checked the
> place out?

It might raise an eyebrow or two...

The Ranger
 
In article <[email protected]>,
Levelwave© <[email protected]> wrote:
>The purpose of the ad is also to promote product awareness... And it seems lately the product
>awareness strategy has been to completely annoy the audience until you give in and see what all the
>fuss is about... It worked with the EXTREMELY obnoxious Hardee's commercials featuring the "Thick
>Burger"... not to mention those Tylenol Tension Headache commercials are pretty annoying
>themselves...

That's a tried-and-true advertising strategy. If you can make the viewer/listener remember the name
of the product, you've pretty much accomplished your goal -- he's more likely to buy it than not,
even if he hates the commercial.

Recently I've heard a radio commercial for a music store, but the name of the store is heard only
during the singing portion of the commercial -- and I can't understand it! I have no idea whose
merchandise it is I'm supposed to be buying -- VERY bad ad design.

--
Mark Shaw contact info at homepage --> http://www.panix.com/~mshaw
========================================================================
"The longer you go, the more the music gets into the walls."

- Muddy Waters
 
In article <[email protected]>, Lynn Gifford <[email protected]> wrote:

> Quizno's is a little pricey for a sandwich shop, but the food is first rate.

I have never had a "first rate" sandwich at a chain sandwich shop. Check out the little non-chain
places and you may find your notion of "first rate" gets recalibrated. Just my opinion....

Mike Beede

P.S., I've been to three Quizmo's outlets and I wouldn't rate any of them better than "non-
poisonous."