Rabbits



E

Enrico C

Guest
How do you rate rabbit meat compared to other meats from a nutritional
point of view?
I read it's a good lean meat, but not so rich in iron.


BTW, [forgive my silly question!], is it true that Americans don't eat
rabbits, as they consider them pets, just like dogs and cats?

I've heard of that, but I've also found different opinions on the
subject... Maybe some Americans do and some don't.

http://spaces.msn.com/members/nikared/Blog/cns!1plvAe9-Mef4fWeKlBR27nRw!272.entry
| One day, S mentioned to my wife that they had just returned home
| from getting some rabbits. My wife was kind of surprised that they
| would buy their kids multiple rabbits as pets. Maybe one, but
| several? S explained the rabbits weren't pets for the kids... The
| rabbits were for eating. Yeah, like rabbit stew, and stuff.
|
| Not shocked?
|
| I think my wife did her best to hide the shock she was feeling, but
| sometime's our faces just don't remember to lie for us. [...]


But then, someone replied:
| Plenty of people raise rabbits and then kill and eat them,


What about hares?
What about the English and other peoples?

Thinking of it, I probably wouldn't eat rabbit meat any longer if I
had a pet rabbit, as I would grow fond of it, and of all rabbits in
general!
Still, I don't have a rabbit. So I eat rabbit meat, once in a while.
In Italy, as you probably know, eating rabbits is absolutely normal,
though not so frequent as eating chicken or beef.


--
Enrico C

* cut the ending "cut-togli.invalid" string when replying by email *
 
M

MSE

Guest
I know people here in the US who eat rabbits, but my family will probably
never eat them because we had 2 rabbits as pets for several years. My
husband even cried when he had to bury them. Now it would be hard to look at
a rabbit as something to eat.


"Enrico C" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> How do you rate rabbit meat compared to other meats from a nutritional
> point of view?
> I read it's a good lean meat, but not so rich in iron.
>
>
> BTW, [forgive my silly question!], is it true that Americans don't eat
> rabbits, as they consider them pets, just like dogs and cats?
>
> I've heard of that, but I've also found different opinions on the
> subject... Maybe some Americans do and some don't.
>
> http://spaces.msn.com/members/nikared/Blog/cns!1plvAe9-Mef4fWeKlBR27nRw!272.entry
> | One day, S mentioned to my wife that they had just returned home
> | from getting some rabbits. My wife was kind of surprised that they
> | would buy their kids multiple rabbits as pets. Maybe one, but
> | several? S explained the rabbits weren't pets for the kids... The
> | rabbits were for eating. Yeah, like rabbit stew, and stuff.
> |
> | Not shocked?
> |
> | I think my wife did her best to hide the shock she was feeling, but
> | sometime's our faces just don't remember to lie for us. [...]
>
>
> But then, someone replied:
> | Plenty of people raise rabbits and then kill and eat them,
>
>
> What about hares?
> What about the English and other peoples?
>
> Thinking of it, I probably wouldn't eat rabbit meat any longer if I
> had a pet rabbit, as I would grow fond of it, and of all rabbits in
> general!
> Still, I don't have a rabbit. So I eat rabbit meat, once in a while.
> In Italy, as you probably know, eating rabbits is absolutely normal,
> though not so frequent as eating chicken or beef.
>
>
> --
> Enrico C
>
> * cut the ending "cut-togli.invalid" string when replying by email *
 
G

George Cherry

Guest
"MSE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s72...
>I know people here in the US who eat rabbits, but my family will probably
>never eat them because we had 2 rabbits as pets for several years. My
>husband even cried when he had to bury them. Now it would be hard to look
>at a rabbit as something to eat.


Yeah, I feel the same way about dogs ever
since I got Gabbi, Emmy, and Greta. : o )
But the Chinese eat dogs. They raise them
under very cruel conditions.
Ever since I visited the Farm Sanctuary about
15 years ago I haven't eaten any fowl or mammal.

George
 
R

Ron Peterson

Guest
Enrico C wrote:
> How do you rate rabbit meat compared to other meats from a nutritional
> point of view?
> I read it's a good lean meat, but not so rich in iron.


Rabbit meat is very lean. I like the taste, but the cost is
considerably higher than chicken and is hard to find. The feed
efficiency of rabbits is high for meat production, and their fur does
have some market value, so it could be an economical meat if sold in
enough volume. Domestic meat production tends to the larger animals
that need less individual care and less work in butchering.

--
Ron
 
T

TC

Guest
Enrico C wrote:
> How do you rate rabbit meat compared to other meats from a nutritional
> point of view?
> I read it's a good lean meat, but not so rich in iron.
>
>
> BTW, [forgive my silly question!], is it true that Americans don't eat
> rabbits, as they consider them pets, just like dogs and cats?
>
> I've heard of that, but I've also found different opinions on the
> subject... Maybe some Americans do and some don't.
>
> http://spaces.msn.com/members/nikared/Blog/cns!1plvAe9-Mef4fWeKlBR27nRw!272.entry
> | One day, S mentioned to my wife that they had just returned home
> | from getting some rabbits. My wife was kind of surprised that they
> | would buy their kids multiple rabbits as pets. Maybe one, but
> | several? S explained the rabbits weren't pets for the kids... The
> | rabbits were for eating. Yeah, like rabbit stew, and stuff.
> |
> | Not shocked?
> |
> | I think my wife did her best to hide the shock she was feeling, but
> | sometime's our faces just don't remember to lie for us. [...]
>
>
> But then, someone replied:
> | Plenty of people raise rabbits and then kill and eat them,
>
>
> What about hares?
> What about the English and other peoples?
>
> Thinking of it, I probably wouldn't eat rabbit meat any longer if I
> had a pet rabbit, as I would grow fond of it, and of all rabbits in
> general!
> Still, I don't have a rabbit. So I eat rabbit meat, once in a while.
> In Italy, as you probably know, eating rabbits is absolutely normal,
> though not so frequent as eating chicken or beef.
>
>
> --
> Enrico C
>
> * cut the ending "cut-togli.invalid" string when replying by email *


I grew up eating the odd bush rabbit. It was a good pastime for us boys
to go out and set snares in the fall and winter in the Maritimes in
Canada. Lots of fun running around the bush. Bush rabbits will have
dark slightly stringy meat. Good for stews or pot pies.

If you buy rabbit in the store, it will probably be grain fed farmed
rabbits and will have light coloured meat that will taste and look very
much like chicken.

Rabbit, especially wild rabbit, is very very lean. People who have had
to survive off of rabbit meat alone have not fared very well. Way too
little fat. There is a type of nutritional deficiency associated with
that, but I can't recall the name.

But, a bit of it would be a fine addition to the diet.

TC
 
T

TC

Guest
TC wrote:
> Enrico C wrote:
> > How do you rate rabbit meat compared to other meats from a nutritional
> > point of view?
> > I read it's a good lean meat, but not so rich in iron.
> >
> >
> > BTW, [forgive my silly question!], is it true that Americans don't eat
> > rabbits, as they consider them pets, just like dogs and cats?
> >
> > I've heard of that, but I've also found different opinions on the
> > subject... Maybe some Americans do and some don't.
> >
> > http://spaces.msn.com/members/nikared/Blog/cns!1plvAe9-Mef4fWeKlBR27nRw!272.entry
> > | One day, S mentioned to my wife that they had just returned home
> > | from getting some rabbits. My wife was kind of surprised that they
> > | would buy their kids multiple rabbits as pets. Maybe one, but
> > | several? S explained the rabbits weren't pets for the kids... The
> > | rabbits were for eating. Yeah, like rabbit stew, and stuff.
> > |
> > | Not shocked?
> > |
> > | I think my wife did her best to hide the shock she was feeling, but
> > | sometime's our faces just don't remember to lie for us. [...]
> >
> >
> > But then, someone replied:
> > | Plenty of people raise rabbits and then kill and eat them,
> >
> >
> > What about hares?
> > What about the English and other peoples?
> >
> > Thinking of it, I probably wouldn't eat rabbit meat any longer if I
> > had a pet rabbit, as I would grow fond of it, and of all rabbits in
> > general!
> > Still, I don't have a rabbit. So I eat rabbit meat, once in a while.
> > In Italy, as you probably know, eating rabbits is absolutely normal,
> > though not so frequent as eating chicken or beef.
> >
> >
> > --
> > Enrico C
> >
> > * cut the ending "cut-togli.invalid" string when replying by email *

>
> I grew up eating the odd bush rabbit. It was a good pastime for us boys
> to go out and set snares in the fall and winter in the Maritimes in
> Canada. Lots of fun running around the bush. Bush rabbits will have
> dark slightly stringy meat. Good for stews or pot pies.
>
> If you buy rabbit in the store, it will probably be grain fed farmed
> rabbits and will have light coloured meat that will taste and look very
> much like chicken.
>
> Rabbit, especially wild rabbit, is very very lean. People who have had
> to survive off of rabbit meat alone have not fared very well. Way too
> little fat. There is a type of nutritional deficiency associated with
> that, but I can't recall the name.
>
> But, a bit of it would be a fine addition to the diet.
>
> TC


Here is a bit of info:

http://www.ourcivilisation.com/fat/chap5.htm

"Primitive people who are forced by adverse circumstances to live on
lean meat-e.g. rabbit meat-with no fat from other sources, develop
diarrhoea within a week with headache, lassitude and vague discomfort.
If they continue for long on lean meat they become incapable of
working. They can eat until their stomaches are distended but still
feel unsatisfied-they suffer from fat-hunger. Introduction of fat into
their diet rapidly relieves all the unpleasant symptoms."

TC