Race report: Mud Sweat & Tears 10k - Edmonton Canada

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Lorne, Sep 14, 2003.

  1. Lorne

    Lorne Guest

    Perfect running weather - 3 degrees, overcast skies, no wind. The first race of spring in these
    parts, but not at all a traditional road race. About 4k is on trails, 4k on paved paths and 2k on
    road. The trail part of the race starts out with a novelty - a drop down 65 stairs to get into a
    ravine. The ravine, then, is another novelty. Here in these parts of Canada, the snow is gone
    everywhere except in treed and shaded areas (such as ravines). So what we ran on for the first 1k
    was a dirt trail covered in (a) mud (b) snow and (c) ice. This ravine is also the means by which
    we get into the river valley, a 30m drop. So some of the last steep hills were treacherous to say
    the least.

    Roughly 200 runners in the 10k and a companion 5k. A lot of new runners, grads of the winter
    learn-to-run Running Room programs. And a lot of runners still figuring out how to dress for a race
    - lots of winter tights, wind pants, fleece, etc. In fact, gloves, shorts and a long sleeve shirt
    were just perfect once I was warmed up.

    I had an approximate goal for the race, but ultimately I threw it out once I saw the conditions of
    the course and the course profile.

    I mentioned the first 1k above. Once we exited a long slippery sheer ice hill (you take little baby
    stutter steps to avoid coasting down on your ass), we were onto the clear paved bike paths that form
    part of a 160km network in the Edmonton river valley. It's flat and comfortable and I was easily
    settled into my 6:45 goal pace.

    After about 2.5k it was back onto trails, this time squishy and muddy - too soft, giving several
    inches with every step. We hit a portion of road for the turnaround, then a water station, then back
    to the start. We didn't go back up the icy hills we came down, though. We used a goat path of some
    sort to get back up - narrow, pock-marked, muddy, several ups and downs including 3 that were so
    steep I walked them because they were ridiculously straight up.

    And then back onto to the roads to the finish, with mud up my legs and backside. I came in at 41:56
    and 8th overall. I am certain the course was short - that certainty comes from understanding that my
    pace on the flats was 42:00-ish and my pace on the trails at the start and end was nowhere near that
    fast. So the course had to be short by at least 500m. Ah well, no one was too worked up about it.
    Any course that starts on a stairway isn't likely to be taken seriously anways. So although the sub-
    42 result lops more than 2-1/2 minutes off my PR I'm not counting it.

    Post-race refreshments included the usual suspects - muffins, fruit and yogurt. Post race massage
    for 2 bucks. There were 20 draw prizes but I was not lucky this time. The finishing prizes were for
    the top 3 overall
    - the men's winner was in at 36:00.

    Next race is two weeks from now - a 10 miler which is held on the streets of the bedroom community I
    live in - the 8 mile mark is about 400m out my door. This is a hugely competitive race, one of
    several you can count on the best coming from all over the province. Over 800 runners, and I won't
    get close to the top 100, even. I'm thinking 70 minutes. If I can get close to that, then it helps
    confirm the 93:00-ish target for my spring goal race - the Red Deer Half in mid-May. At least I
    think it does.

    Thanks for reading.
    --
    Lorne Sundby
     
    Tags:


  2. "Lorne" <[email protected]> wrote...
    >
    > And then back onto to the roads to the finish, with mud up my legs and backside. I came in at
    > 41:56 and 8th overall.

    Christ, you are fast. The course sounds totally crazy. Did that frustrate you somewhat or did you
    enjoy the craziness of it? How about the other runners? I bet they're thinking that racing must sure
    be a very odd sport. :)

    Congrats and thanks for the great report - enjoyed reading it.

    cheers, nina
     
  3. Roger Hunter

    Roger Hunter Guest

  4. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    nice racing, Lorne! good time and placing, esp. considering the ice, snow and mud, and steps to slow
    one down. what's your PR, by the way? i only ask because i'd need the *perfect* day and course, plus
    some illegal substances, to give me a time like that.

    congrats,

    Cam

    In article <[email protected]>, Lorne <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Perfect running weather - 3 degrees, overcast skies, no wind. The first race of spring in these
    > parts, but not at all a traditional road race. About 4k is on trails, 4k on paved paths and 2k on
    > road. The trail part of the race starts out with a novelty - a drop down 65 stairs to get into a
    > ravine. The ravine, then, is another novelty. Here in these parts of Canada, the snow is gone
    > everywhere except in treed and shaded areas (such as ravines). So what we ran on for the first 1k
    > was a dirt trail covered in (a) mud (b) snow and (c) ice. This ravine is also the means by which
    > we get into the river valley, a 30m drop. So some of the last steep hills were treacherous to say
    > the least.
    >
    > Roughly 200 runners in the 10k and a companion 5k. A lot of new runners, grads of the winter
    > learn-to-run Running Room programs. And a lot of runners still figuring out how to dress for a
    > race - lots of winter tights, wind pants, fleece, etc. In fact, gloves, shorts and a long sleeve
    > shirt were just perfect once I was warmed up.
    >
    > I had an approximate goal for the race, but ultimately I threw it out once I saw the conditions of
    > the course and the course profile.
    >
    > I mentioned the first 1k above. Once we exited a long slippery sheer ice hill (you take little
    > baby stutter steps to avoid coasting down on your ass), we were onto the clear paved bike paths
    > that form part of a 160km network in the Edmonton river valley. It's flat and comfortable and I
    > was easily settled into my 6:45 goal pace.
    >
    > After about 2.5k it was back onto trails, this time squishy and muddy - too soft, giving several
    > inches with every step. We hit a portion of road for the turnaround, then a water station, then
    > back to the start. We didn't go back up the icy hills we came down, though. We used a goat path of
    > some sort to get back up - narrow, pock-marked, muddy, several ups and downs including 3 that were
    > so steep I walked them because they were ridiculously straight up.
    >
    > And then back onto to the roads to the finish, with mud up my legs and backside. I came in at
    > 41:56 and 8th overall. I am certain the course was short - that certainty comes from understanding
    > that my pace on the flats was 42:00-ish and my pace on the trails at the start and end was nowhere
    > near that fast. So the course had to be short by at least 500m. Ah well, no one was too worked up
    > about it. Any course that starts on a stairway isn't likely to be taken seriously anways. So
    > although the sub- 42 result lops more than 2-1/2 minutes off my PR I'm not counting it.
    >
    > Post-race refreshments included the usual suspects - muffins, fruit and yogurt. Post race massage
    > for 2 bucks. There were 20 draw prizes but I was not lucky this time. The finishing prizes were
    > for the top 3 overall
    > - the men's winner was in at 36:00.
    >
    > Next race is two weeks from now - a 10 miler which is held on the streets of the bedroom community
    > I live in - the 8 mile mark is about 400m out my door. This is a hugely competitive race, one of
    > several you can count on the best coming from all over the province. Over 800 runners, and I won't
    > get close to the top 100, even. I'm thinking 70 minutes. If I can get close to that, then it helps
    > confirm the 93:00-ish target for my spring goal race - the Red Deer Half in mid-May. At least I
    > think it does.
    >
    > Thanks for reading.
     
  5. Lorne

    Lorne Guest

    On 13 Apr 2003, "nina stoessinger" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Christ, you are fast. The course sounds totally crazy. Did that frustrate you somewhat or did you
    > enjoy the craziness of it? How about the other runners? I bet they're thinking that racing must
    > sure be a very odd sport. :)
    >
    > Congrats and thanks for the great report - enjoyed reading it.
    >

    Thanks Nina. I think you just enjoy the craziness of it. Most of the other runners seemed to be Ok
    with the challenge. Seems the trails at the end with the 3 straight-up sections were the main topic
    of conversation post-race. You wobble a little when you get to the top and start running on flat
    land again. Part of the challenge and the fun.

    Racing IS an odd sport - that's part of the charm!
    --
    Lorne Sundby
     
  6. >However, one bit intrigued me. What is "a bedroom community"?

    The kind of place that excludes people like you.

    Bill R.

    =============> - -- - (_!_)
    OO
     
  7. Sounds like fun! (of a sort, anyhoo.) Nice report, nice result.

    --
    Brian P. Baresch Fort Worth, Texas, USA Professional editing and proofreading

    If you're going through hell, keep going. --Winston Churchill
     
  8. Lorne

    Lorne Guest

    On 13 Apr 2003, Cam Wilson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > what's your PR, by the way? i only ask because i'd need the *perfect* day and course, plus some
    > illegal substances, to give me a time like that.
    >

    My PR on a course that I know to be a full 10k is 44:24. Since that run I've had a year of marathon
    training and 4 months of half marathon training so I expect I've improved but not to a sub-42 on a
    course like today - which is why I'm convinced it was short.

    --
    Lorne Sundby
     
  9. sounds like my kind of race - great, evocative report - thanks Jonathan "Lorne"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Perfect running weather - 3 degrees, overcast skies, no wind. The first race of spring in these
    > parts, but not at all a traditional road race. About 4k is on trails, 4k on paved paths and 2k on
    > road. The trail part of the race starts out with a novelty - a drop down 65 stairs to get into a
    > ravine. The ravine, then, is another novelty. Here in these parts of Canada, the snow is gone
    > everywhere except in treed and shaded areas (such as ravines). So what we ran on for the first 1k
    > was a dirt trail covered in (a) mud (b) snow and (c) ice. This ravine is also the means by which
    > we get into the river valley, a 30m drop. So some of the last steep hills were treacherous to say
    > the least.
    >
    > Roughly 200 runners in the 10k and a companion 5k. A lot of new runners, grads of the winter
    > learn-to-run Running Room programs. And a lot of runners still figuring out how to dress for a
    > race - lots of winter tights, wind pants, fleece, etc. In fact, gloves, shorts and a long sleeve
    > shirt were just perfect once I was warmed up.
    >
    > I had an approximate goal for the race, but ultimately I threw it out once I saw the conditions of
    > the course and the course profile.
    >
    > I mentioned the first 1k above. Once we exited a long slippery sheer ice hill (you take little
    > baby stutter steps to avoid coasting down on your ass), we were onto the clear paved bike paths
    > that form part of a 160km network in the Edmonton river valley. It's flat and comfortable and I
    > was easily settled into my 6:45 goal pace.
    >
    > After about 2.5k it was back onto trails, this time squishy and muddy - too soft, giving several
    > inches with every step. We hit a portion of road for the turnaround, then a water station, then
    > back to the start. We didn't go back up the icy hills we came down, though. We used a goat path of
    > some sort to get back up - narrow, pock-marked, muddy, several ups and downs including 3 that were
    > so steep I walked them because they were ridiculously straight up.
    >
    > And then back onto to the roads to the finish, with mud up my legs and backside. I came in at
    > 41:56 and 8th overall. I am certain the course was short - that certainty comes from understanding
    > that my pace on the flats was 42:00-ish and my pace on the trails at the start and end was nowhere
    > near that fast. So the course had to be short by at least 500m. Ah well, no one was too worked up
    > about it. Any course that starts on a stairway isn't likely to be taken seriously anways. So
    > although the sub- 42 result lops more than 2-1/2 minutes off my PR I'm not counting it.
    >
    > Post-race refreshments included the usual suspects - muffins, fruit and yogurt. Post race massage
    > for 2 bucks. There were 20 draw prizes but I was not lucky this time. The finishing prizes were
    > for the top 3 overall
    > - the men's winner was in at 36:00.
    >
    > Next race is two weeks from now - a 10 miler which is held on the streets of the bedroom community
    > I live in - the 8 mile mark is about 400m out my door. This is a hugely competitive race, one of
    > several you can count on the best coming from all over the province. Over 800 runners, and I won't
    > get close to the top 100, even. I'm thinking 70 minutes. If I can get close to that, then it helps
    > confirm the 93:00-ish target for my spring goal race - the Red Deer Half in mid-May. At least I
    > think it does.
    >
    > Thanks for reading.
    > --
    > Lorne Sundby
     
  10. Ed Prochak

    Ed Prochak Guest

    Roger Hunter wrote:
    > "Lorne" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Dull report, but then maybe it was a dull race? However, one bit intrigued me. What is "a bedroom
    > community"?

    A small town that has little or no industry.

    IOW, you live and sleep there but work elsewhere.

    --
    Ed Prochak running http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-faq/ netiquette http://www.psg.com/emily.html
    --
    "Two roads diverged in a wood and I I took the one less travelled by and that has made all the
    difference." robert frost
     
  11. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Lorne <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 13 Apr 2003, Cam Wilson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > what's your PR, by the way? i only ask because i'd need the *perfect* day and course, plus some
    > > illegal substances, to give me a time like that.
    > >
    >
    > My PR on a course that I know to be a full 10k is 44:24. Since that run I've had a year of
    > marathon training and 4 months of half marathon training so I expect I've improved but not to a
    > sub-42 on a course like today - which is why I'm convinced it was short.

    you are likely correct on this. your best is only about a minute faster than mine, and in those
    rough ground conditions, i can't see how one could improve their 10K time by so much.

    still an excellent race.

    Cam
     
  12. In article <[email protected]> Lorne <[email protected]> writes:
    >About 4k is on trails, 4k on paved paths and 2k on road. The trail part of the race starts out with
    >a novelty - a drop down 65 stairs to get into a ravine. The ravine, then, is another novelty. Here
    >in these parts of Canada, the snow is gone everywhere except in treed and shaded areas (such as
    >ravines). So what we ran on for the first 1k was a dirt trail covered in (a) mud (b) snow and (c)
    >ice. This ravine is also the means by which we get into the river valley, a 30m drop. So some of
    >the last steep hills were treacherous to say the least.
    >
    >And then back onto to the roads to the finish, with mud up my legs and backside. I came in at 41:56
    >and 8th overall. I am certain the course was short - that certainty comes from understanding that
    >my pace on the flats was 42:00-ish and my pace on the trails at the start and end was nowhere near
    >that fast. So the course had to be short by at least 500m. Ah well, no one was too worked up about
    >it. Any course that starts on a stairway isn't likely to be taken seriously anways. So although the
    >sub- 42 result lops more than 2-1/2 minutes off my PR I'm not counting it.
    >
    >Lorne Sundby

    Congrats, Lorne! 8th overall, wow! Thanks for the interesting report, that sounds like a truly
    unique run course. And quite difficult (but it sounds like fun).

    Teresa in AZ
     
  13. "Lorne" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Racing IS an odd sport - that's part of the charm!

    :eek:) so true.

    nina
     
Loading...
Loading...