Racing and being a diabetic

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by cbb, Jan 27, 2004.

  1. cbb

    cbb New Member

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    I have been riding for over 10 years. I love to ride and compete as well as some long distance touring. Recently I was diagnosed as a diabetic. I am on medication and try to follow a low glycemic index diet, meaning you stay away from the high carbs. Before a race I eat a multi grain roll and banana, during the race I drink an energy drink. I even tried eating jelly beans during the only to find it was too hard to swallow. That is my problem I run out of energy during the race which effect performance. I am 51 I'm no Lance Armstrong (boy I wish I was) I just want to compete to the best of my ability. Any advice would grateful
     
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  2. worldgod

    worldgod New Member

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    NEW CLINICAL STUDY UNCOVERS MECHANISM BY WHICH CHROMIUM PICOLINATE MAY ENHANCE INSULIN SENSITIVITY

    IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Effective and Safe Complementary Nutrition Therapy
    Presented at 18th International Diabetes Federation Congress



    PARIS, France, August 28, 2003 (Nutrition 21, Inc. Nasdaq: NXXI) - The results of a new double-blind randomized placebo controlled human trial of people with type 2 diabetes revealed a potential mechanism that may explain the ability of chromium picolinate to improve insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle - the primary site for glucose metabolism. These data suggest that when chromium picolinate is added to the diet, insulin sensitivity improves for people with diabetes, a chronic disease that affects 194 million people worldwide. The findings were presented by Dr. William T. Cefalu from the University of Vermont College of Medicine, USA at the 18th International Diabetes Federation Congress.



    Research suggests that the potential in vivo mechanism of chromium picolinate on insulin action in human skeletal muscle may occur by increasing the activation of Akt phosphorylation -- an intracellular insulin dependent protein that facilitates the uptake of glucose into cells.



    "This study demonstrates that those individuals with type 2 diabetes who supplemented their diet with chromium picolinate had an enhanced activity of the protein compared to those who were on placebo," stated Dr. Cefalu. "As this intracellular pathway is implicated in contributing to insulin resistance, this represents a possible mechanism to explain chromium picolinate's beneficial effect on insulin sensitivity as observed in several clinical studies."



    The clinical trial
    The double-blind, placebo controlled trial, included two cohorts of subjects with type 2 diabetes who were treated with either sulfonylureas (a class of diabetic drugs that increase insulin secretion), or a diet program. Both groups were randomized to receive either chromium picolinate (1000 mcg) daily or placebo. The most accurate measure of insulin sensitivity, hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp studies, were used to assess the efficacy of glucose uptake on all subjects prior to randomization and at the end of the study. Of the 16 subjects, those randomized to chromium picolinate had a mean increase in insulin sensitivity of 8.9%, while the placebo group had a mean decrease of 3.6%. In addition, insulin-stimulated Akt activation was significantly increased at the end of the study compared to those subjects on placebo. No adverse events were reported.


    A Cost Effective Nutrition Therapy
    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that four to five percent of health budgets are spent on diabetes-related illnesses and that people with diabetes incur medical costs two to five times higher than people without diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), direct and indirect costs of diabetes are $132 billion a year in the United States.



    Chromium is an essential mineral that is a co-factor of insulin. "By applying rigorous science, we hope to show chromium's potential to improve the quality of patient care for people with diabetes and reduce cost of therapy," said James Komorowski, MS, Vice President of Technical Services and Scientific Affairs, Nutrition 21, Inc., which supplied Chromaxâ chromium picolinate for the study. Chromax chromium picolinate is the most clinically tested brand of chromium with proven efficacy for support of glucose metabolism. "This new research further supports the large body of scientific evidence showing chromium picolinate is a safe and effective addition to the diet for people with type 2 diabetes seeking optimal control of their blood sugar levels."
     
  3. patch70

    patch70 New Member

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    When you "run out of energy", do you do a fingerprick glucose test? It would help to know if you are getting hypoglycemic and therefore need to eat more before/during the race. Alternatively, is your glucose level fine and you are not yet fit enough?
     
  4. fabiosav

    fabiosav New Member

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    I would go with some close monitoring way before starting on chromium...
     
  5. oldnbusted

    oldnbusted New Member

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    Forget Potassium, fit a second bottle cage to your bike and fill it with an isotonic high glucose drink, it requires quite a few glucose checks before and after to find out how much to drink, but its about the simplest method. And remember, if you are taking insulin, then be careful in the hours following a ride, your body is more sensitive to insulin post exercise, so the risk of hypos is increased.
     
  6. scutty

    scutty New Member

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    As a Type 1 insulin-dependant diabetic on humalog and lantus, I've competed in a few endurance races, triathalons, adventure races. The longest to date has only been a 25 mile event. I'm currently training for a 70-miler May 21st.

    I can't agree enough with the quote above when it comes to testing during and after a race or training event. The little blood glucose testers they have now function in just seconds, and can save you from going low. Going low can cost you valuable time in a race, or much, much worse if you train alone.

    When training I've been able to establish a rate that I must consume of a high-carb sports drink. My camel-back has in it my blood tester and is full of gatorade. I've trained my self to suck on it almost constantly, and vary the concentration of mix in it in an effort to maintain a glucose level 100-150. Any higher and I have to stop and pee, and also feel kinda sick & lathargic. Any lower and I cannot concentrate, and worry about going even lower.

    I am still struggling, however, with adjusting my lantus dose as I get in better shape due to seasonal training. My doctor has suggested I leave the lantus alone and vary the humalog-to-carb ratio at meals. This is more difficult. What has anyone tried. I'd like any suggestions.
     
  7. martin_j001

    martin_j001 New Member

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    scutty, have you considered an insulin pump at all? It has been a life saver for me--such a great piece of technology and it really decreases the amount of time and effort you have to put into paying attention to your diabetes (it frees you a little bit of the disease, if you get what I mean).

    cbb, like the others said, testing your blood sugar is the best way to know what you need--food, or more training. Many diabetics forget that they will need to increase carbohydrate (both simple and complex) before and during a ride. I pretty much practice what the pros do--eat something with a decent amount of carbs in it one to two hours before a ride, carry gatorade in one of my bottles, along with gels (for a quick sugar boost), and bars for a more extended energy boost or when I'm just feeling tired--eating a powerbar or something similar is usually accompanied by 1/2 the amount of insulin I'd take to cover it without exercise (eg to eat one now I may take 3 units of insulin, while riding I would take only 1 or 1.5 units).

    Figuring out what your body needs during rides is very hard to do and takes lots of practice, and thankfully I've been practicing for over 20 years now and have got it down pretty well.

    Good luck. (and chromium is no wonder drug. been there, tried that, researched that to death....)
     
  8. Iankatz

    Iankatz New Member

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    Guys, I've been a type 1 for 17 years, riding for the last year. So far I think that being a type one gives me an advantage over anyone that rides. If you take lantis (sp?) you can adjust your dose so that you can consume food (energy) and USE IT FAST. This is the newest thing for weightlifters. They use it to enhance muscle growth and performance. I think that other non diabetic riders are using insulin for the same reason.

    If you think that I’m full of crap try this:

    Take no insulin and eat nothing, then go for a ride. You’ll feel like a little girl on your bike.

    Now take just some short acting insulin, eat and go for a ride: You’ll feel good at the start but after 30 miles, you’ll again fell like a little girl.

    Now eat and take some lantis (a little more than your use too) let your blood sugure go up and take some short acting insulin (1 to 2 units will do it) also your BS should be around 300, take some gel and energy drinks, and you’ll feel like a GOD on your bike.

    Just be sure you keep putting in fuel as you go.



    Insulin is a energy liberator, it allows your cells to use sugar, thus giving you god like power.
     
  9. martin_j001

    martin_j001 New Member

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    Not to sound like anyones mom or anything, but that whole post is horrible--inaccurate and downright stupid--especially in terms of taking care of yourself as a diabetic. Many many years of research (by people much, much smarter than yourself) tells you that if your blood sugar is higher (over the normal range of 80-120 or so), your perforamance will decrease. And using your poor blood sugar control like in this way is just as dangerous to your health as is using insulin in a non-diabetic.
     
  10. Iankatz

    Iankatz New Member

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    I guess you're not a type one. I am type one, and not as stupid as you are.

    Did I also tell you diabetics that my A1C are at 4.9 - 5.5 level, I must be doing some thing right.

    The next time someone wants to call BS on my post they better be a diabetic.
     
  11. martin_j001

    martin_j001 New Member

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    You are plenty as stupid as me, for your suggestions of someone not taking care of themself adequately (as you are not their doctor and are advising something that no diabetic should ever do), and you didn't bother to read the rest of the thread, because I have already provided you with the fact that I am a type 1 diabetic. Put on your thinking cap, use it, and then get back to the boards, and don't post worthless bullshit that could get someone hurt. If you want to injure yourself, go for it--it may actually help in your case. Don't ever come on here and advise people to do something that is dangerous to them though.

    As I said, if you would have read the previous statements, you would know that I am type 1, and have been for over 20 years now. I would also point to the fact that A1c, while a good way to predict your overall health status, is not THE determining factor in your care of your diabetes. Allowing your bloodsugar to reach any higher than normal will drastically reduce your ability to perform at anything--hence the reason it is dangerous in so many ways. This is, and has been, a well known and researched fact for quite some time now.

    Second of all, on your "hypothesis" about pros using insulin for performance benefits--how will that make their blood sugar higher? The body of a person without diabetes will produce its own insulin and regulate its own blood sugar, regardless of whether or not you give it extra insulin. Adding insulin to this equation will cause the blood sugar to go even lower than it normally should. In this case, the body will be readily looking for any available energy source, and will use up what it finds very quickly--fat, muscle and any form of simple sugar (gels, energy drinks, etc), and allow for an energy boost. This is very contrary to the information you post, where you recomend that you allow your blood sugar to get extremely high (keep in mind "normal" is 80-120, and you are recomending allowing it to reach 300?????), and then adding sugar to that by consuming gels or an energy drink. While your A1c may point to you being healthy, this behavior is extremely unhealthy, and you should know that if you have had diabetes for 15 or more years. There has been evidence over the past several years stating that allowing the blood sugar to move drastically up and down is what tends to cause most of the problems diabetics experience--hence the push in using insulin pumps for treating this disease best. Keeping the blood sugar from spiking, in either direction, is an important part of overall health with diabetes, HbA1c does not take blood sugar spiking into account at all.
     
  12. martin_j001

    martin_j001 New Member

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    http://www.ultrafit.com/library/Nutrition/diabetes.pdf

    http://www.physsportsmed.com/issues/1999/04_99/white.htm
    "Hyperglycemia. The opposite crisis, hyperglycemia, is a risk for patients who are in poor metabolic control. Without adequate insulin, muscle cells cannot utilize glucose during exercise, glucagon-induced production of glucose from the liver is unopposed, and fatty acids are mobilized to supply fuel. The result: increasing hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acidosis (16). This is one reason blood glucose monitoring before exercise is essential."

    Please, anyone who may be reading this thread, completely ignore this character that is advising that you let your blood sugar get very high, then advising you to ingest sugar and "you'll feel like a god". You will not, please, if you don't want to believe either or us, please go talk to your doctor, or find a diabetes support group. You can always visit www.insulin-pumpers.org if you would like to ask for advice, as they are very helpful people when it comes to all topics, but please, whatever you do, I am begging you not to take this guys advice, please.
     
  13. fabiosav

    fabiosav New Member

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    I 100% join Martin on this one: even if his suggestions work (which I doubt are not mostly in his head) they are maddness. If they do work they are a form of cheating as well.
     
  14. martin_j001

    martin_j001 New Member

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    Thank you very much fabiosav. I really hope everyone who has read this thread, especially those with diabetes, are checking their resources and getting advice from their doctors before attempting anything like what was posted earlier.
     
  15. tingland

    tingland New Member

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    I am Hypoglycemic and have to watch that I do not over do it on the sugars and carbs. I race mountain bikes and love to road ride, as well. I do not want to get into the debate over jacking up insulin...I am not qualified. But, I can lend a tip. Visit http://www.lavagel.com They make a gel that is not made with simple sugars. I love them and they work great...they don't even upset my stomach. I highly recommend them.
     
  16. martin_j001

    martin_j001 New Member

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    Do you mean to say you are hypERglycemic (you have high blood sugar)? If you were hypoglycemic, you would always need to have something around that does have simple sugars, in case you blood sugar went too low....

    The reccomendation for Lava Gel is a good one though for anyone who is racing, let alone diabetics. Super quick, high blood sugar spikes don't help many people when they are racing (or training), so the complex carbs in this product will help to eliminate the high blood sugar spikes.
     
  17. tingland

    tingland New Member

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    Nope...I am hypOglycemic. I over-produce insulin causing my blood sugar to dip pretty low (if my blood sugar spikes up pretty high). So, I have to regulate my blood sugar through diet (the same as a diabetic). Basically, I stay away from simple sugars to keep my sugar levels on an even plane. If I eat something that jacks my blood sugar up...my insulin kicks in and then my sugar goes way down. I really don't have much trouble with it unless I go for quite some time without eating (or eating good food). I also have to be careful when riding and not take in too much sugar or carbs. I end up not using them properly and store them (resulting in high triglycerides and elevated cholesterol). But, that is another story for another topic.

    The LavaGels are great. They work really well and taste great. They have a thinner consitancy than GU or other gels out there so they go down real easy and don't hang around in your mouth. I highly recommend them....
     
  18. Iankatz

    Iankatz New Member

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    you're a fool if you think you should ride with a BS of 120 or lower, and yes you should let it reach 300 if you're going to burn more than 700 cal. an hour. I'm simply stating that if you're going to ride hard you need to be high or you'll bottom out so fast it will make your head spin. My bs mean is < 120 and I don't think that you could ride with me.

    You're all missing my point. E = (Bs)+(insulin) without that you cannot perform. Any diabetic that rides as hard as I do will agree.

    As for insulin and cycling, I was speaking about recovrey.
     
  19. martin_j001

    martin_j001 New Member

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    Sorry about the confusion on my part, and thanks for clearing it up.
    :)



    And anyone reading this, once again, do the research on your own and speak to your doctor. IanKatz may be doing what works for him, but this is still not advisable regardless of how hard you ride. Yes, you need to keep your blood sugar from going too low, but jacking it up to 300 over and over again is going to do much more harm than good. Overall, you will be far healthier if you can maintain a constant blood sugar level of 80-120 (which I am fully aware is not very easy to do while riding long distances or races).

    And, I'm sorry you had to bring it up to make you feel better about yourself (also shows your insecurity in all issues), but this has nothing to do with whether or not I can keep up with you or ride farther, IanKatz--its about facts of being a diabetic and how to exercise in a healthy manner. If you want to keep doing things the way you have been, by all means do it. I wouldn't suggest it for anyone else though, and as I've said before, please everyone, please talk to your doctors and do your own research first.
     
  20. elswhere15

    elswhere15 New Member

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    On the support group front for anyone in the UK you may already be aware of Diabetes UK but if not we found them very helpful http://www.diabetes.org.uk

    I apologise if you think the rest of this post is inappropriate - I most sincerely do not wish to offend anyone. I've just been reading through this thread, and was concerned by this debate. I don't profess to be an expert at all so pease don't jump on me(!) My understanding (and as I said I'm not an expert) is that often it's not just the Diabetes it'self that's the problem but the associated complications, eg sight lost, difficulty fighting infection etc that can arise from poor diabetes control and persistently high blood sugars, sometimes further down the line.

    My Dad was diagnosed two years ago with Type 2 Diabetes and even with good control he still wound up in hospital last week with Pneumonia & heart complications from being unable to properly fend off a chest infection. I hate dress shopping with an unsurpassed passion - but believe me, I like it a whole lot more than being interupted in the middle of the changing room with a call to let me know he was going in 100+ miles away which is what happened. I guess everyone knows what is best for them, but I would ask them to think about future implications of bizarre control methods now, I'm with Martin, talk to your GP and research on your own too - I would hate for the people who love you to see what I & mum had to last week. I'm sorry to harp on here, I too do not want to sound
    :eek:

    (BTW, he's out and much improved now).

    Take care:)
     
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