Racing 'must have' list

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Kbh, May 12, 2003.

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  1. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    Hola,

    My wife just got into bike racing, is doing quite well, and is planning on racing a lot more. For
    her upcoming brithday, I would like to assemble of kit of bike racing 'must haves' for her. You can
    assume she has the bike, various jersey's, helmet, etc... I'm just looking for some ideas that are
    specific to preparing for, or riding in, a race.

    Thanks,

    Kyle
     
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  2. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hola,
    >
    > My wife just got into bike racing, is doing quite well, and is planning on racing a lot more. For
    > her upcoming brithday, I would like to assemble of kit of bike racing 'must haves' for her. You
    > can assume she has the bike, various jersey's, helmet, etc... I'm just looking for some ideas that
    > are specific to preparing for, or riding in, a race.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Kyle
    >
    >
    All you really need is the same things you take on a ride: helmet, shoes, glasses, etc.

    If you really wanna get technical, bring a trainer to warm up on, some wipes to clean up afterwards,
    two of everything (you never know when you've forgotten something!), a floor pump, tools, and a
    cooler with refreshments in it.

    Most of the stuff isn't tough to figure out. Bring the things you think you'll need 'cause
    eventually, you will.

    Mike
     
  3. "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Hola,
    >
    > My wife just got into bike racing, is doing quite well, and is planning on racing a lot more. For
    > her upcoming brithday, I would like to assemble of kit of bike racing 'must haves' for her. You
    > can assume she has the bike, various jersey's, helmet, etc... I'm just looking for some ideas that
    > are specific to preparing for, or riding in, a race.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Kyle

    Must haves:
    1) A racing license from USA Cycling.
    2) A signed release form.
    3) Money for entry fees. Paying in advance saves a late entry fee, but has some risk
    associated with it.
    4) A properly adjusted, pumped up, lubricated, and tested bicycle*.
    5) A suitcase of courage** =]

    Nice to haves (some specific to the hot Florida weather I race in):
    6) Extra safety pins for pinning racing number to jersey***.
    7) A trainer for warming up and cooling down.
    8) Sun screen****.
    9) A fold-up chair.
    10) A tent or umbrella for shade.
    11) Plenty to eat and drink pre, during, and post race. Bring a cooler if there is room.
    12) A towel to change with.
    13) A plastic bag to put your nasty, sweaty racing clothes in post race.
    14) Some loot for whatever else you may need.
    15) If staying overnight, an overnight kit with toothbrush, toothpaste, etc.
    16) Clipless pedals and shoes.
    17) If she is planning on sprinting, brifters (Shimano or Campy).
    18) A extra set of light race-only wheels with a tight cogset.
    19) A nice set of sunglasses.
    20) A set of post race clothes, including a hat to cover up your helmet hair.
    21) Some water to wash off post race.
    22) Black socks and rain coat if it looks like rain (look at the weather on the weather channel or
    internet before you leave). Having the proper clothing can be the difference between having a
    great and terrible time.

    Hope this helps.

    - Boyd S.

    * Don't wait until the night before a race to do this stuff. ** Credit to Paul Sherwin *** I have
    a "lucky" set of stainless steel safety pins which won't leave a rust stain on my jersey if I
    forget to take them out for a while. **** Use a waterproof, sweatproof SPF 30-45 sunscreen
    which protects for both UVA and UVB.
     
  4. Kyle Legate

    Kyle Legate Guest

    Mike S. wrote:
    >
    > If you really wanna get technical, bring a trainer to warm up on, some wipes to clean up
    > afterwards, two of everything (you never know when you've forgotten something!), a floor pump,
    > tools, and a cooler with refreshments in it.
    >
    A floor pump and a cooler is a good idea. Maybe a great big tub of Bag Balm. Spare tubes and tires
    cause you can never have enough. Tagaderm because although you hope you'll never have to use it,
    you'll be glad to have it on hand if you need it.
     
  5. Jeff Potter

    Jeff Potter Guest

    Warm-up trainer seems overkill. Unless you also have a little sun-tent to go with it. : ) How many
    places don't have ROADS to do a bit of warm-up on? The others are good tips, tho. First-aid: yeah.

    Kyle Legate wrote:

    > Mike S. wrote:
    > >
    > > If you really wanna get technical, bring a trainer to warm up on,

    --

    Jeff Potter [email protected] http://OutYourBackdoor.com -- a friendly ezine of modern
    folkways and culture revival...offering a line of alternative books and a world of bikes, boats,
    skis...plus shops for great sleeper books, videos and music ...plus nationwide "Off the Beaten Path"
    travel forums for local fun, bumperstickers and a new social magnet stickers! ...Holy Smokes!!!
     
  6. Bob McBreen

    Bob McBreen Guest

    I would add a bike computer & heart rate monitor. Great for training, and knowing what is going on
    with your body during a race.

    "Boyd Speerschneider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > Hola,
    > >
    > > My wife just got into bike racing, is doing quite well, and is planning on racing a lot more.
    > > For her upcoming brithday, I would like to assemble of kit of bike racing 'must haves' for her.
    > > You can assume she has the bike, various jersey's, helmet, etc... I'm just looking for some
    > > ideas that are specific to preparing for, or riding in, a race.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Kyle
    >
    > Must haves:
    > 1) A racing license from USA Cycling.
    > 2) A signed release form.
    > 3) Money for entry fees. Paying in advance saves a late entry fee, but has some risk associated
    > with it.
    > 4) A properly adjusted, pumped up, lubricated, and tested bicycle*.
    > 5) A suitcase of courage** =]
    >
    > Nice to haves (some specific to the hot Florida weather I race in):
    > 1) Extra safety pins for pinning racing number to jersey***.
    > 2) A trainer for warming up and cooling down.
    > 3) Sun screen****.
    > 4) A fold-up chair.
    > 5) A tent or umbrella for shade.
    > 6) Plenty to eat and drink pre, during, and post race. Bring a cooler if there is room.
    > 7) A towel to change with.
    > 8) A plastic bag to put your nasty, sweaty racing clothes in post race.
    > 9) Some loot for whatever else you may need.
    > 10) If staying overnight, an overnight kit with toothbrush, toothpaste, etc.
    > 11) Clipless pedals and shoes.
    > 12) If she is planning on sprinting, brifters (Shimano or Campy).
    > 13) A extra set of light race-only wheels with a tight cogset.
    > 14) A nice set of sunglasses.
    > 15) A set of post race clothes, including a hat to cover up your helmet hair.
    > 16) Some water to wash off post race.
    > 17) Black socks and rain coat if it looks like rain (look at the weather on the weather channel or
    > internet before you leave). Having the proper clothing can be the difference between having a
    > great and terrible time.
    >
    > Hope this helps.
    >
    > - Boyd S.
    >
    > * Don't wait until the night before a race to do this stuff. ** Credit to Paul Sherwin *** I
    > have a "lucky" set of stainless steel safety pins which won't leave a rust stain on my jersey
    > if I forget to take them out for a while. **** Use a waterproof, sweatproof SPF 30-45
    > sunscreen which protects for both UVA and UVB.
     
  7. Jeff Potter <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Warm-up trainer seems overkill. Unless you also have a little sun-tent to go with it. : ) How many
    > places don't have ROADS to do a bit of warm-up on? The others are good tips, tho. First-aid: yeah.

    Sometimes useful, since at some races, urban or rural, roads can be inconvenient or closed or full
    of bad-tempered detoured drivers. There are some races around here where the race announcement says

    To the OP, read this: http://bikerace.ahc.umn.edu/firstrace.html
     
  8. Chas.

    Chas. Guest

    Kyle,

    I have found the "Topo USA" to be nice for scoping out course profiles etc -- assuming your wife is
    racing in the US.

    REgards, Chas.

    "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hola,
    >
    > My wife just got into bike racing, is doing quite well, and is planning on racing a lot more. For
    > her upcoming brithday, I would like to assemble of kit of bike racing 'must haves' for her. You
    > can assume she has the bike, various jersey's, helmet, etc... I'm just looking for some ideas that
    > are specific to preparing for, or riding in, a race.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Kyle
     
  9. "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hola,
    >
    > My wife just got into bike racing, is doing quite well, and is planning on racing a lot more. For
    > her upcoming brithday, I would like to assemble of kit of bike racing 'must haves' for her. You
    > can assume she has the bike, various jersey's, helmet, etc... I'm just looking for some ideas that
    > are specific to preparing for, or riding in, a race.

    If you really want to get 'pro', don't forget:

    1) lightweight 2-way radios so you, acting as DS, can bark out race strategy to her
    2) a syringe of liquid amphetamine
    3) a condom full of 'clean' urine, if it's a UCI race and the piss test issue arises
    4) an extra black book for the phone #'s of desperate master's cyclists making passes (see thread:
    "Probably a masters cyclist")

    you're welcome, in advance.

    Kurgan Gringioni rbr masters national champion
     
  10. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    Always have:

    Spare wheelset, Spare shoes, Spare helmet, Spare sunglasses, Spare gloves.

    There is nothing crappier than getting to a race feeling really good to find out that you forgot
    your shoes. The spare stuff goes in a racing bax that always goes in the trunk for racing.

    A trainer to warmup on is nice but not really necessary if you get there early enough.

    Spare time is a big plus. If you do some of the housework then she can spend more time on the bike.
    That makes a huge difference in performance.

    Find her a local girls racing team. Girls are different than guys. We have fun training in a
    gourp and all that but we can train alone and be fine. Women train much better in groups with a
    group goal.

    If your wife is serious a nice present is a year of coaching. This does make a big difference if
    you're serious and will take the trouble to follow the advice. Otherwise it's just a waste of money.

    "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hola,
    >
    > My wife just got into bike racing, is doing quite well, and is
    planning on
    > racing a lot more. For her upcoming brithday, I would like to
    assemble of
    > kit of bike racing 'must haves' for her. You can assume she has the
    bike,
    > various jersey's, helmet, etc... I'm just looking for some ideas
    that are
    > specific to preparing for, or riding in, a race.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Kyle
     
  11. Jeff Potter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Warm-up trainer seems overkill. Unless you also have a little sun-tent to go with it. : ) How many
    > places don't have ROADS to do a bit of warm-up on?

    Jeff, were you ever a good rider? That is coming close to your potential in terms of the amount of
    time you had to train. Or have you ever coached another cyclist to come close to his/her potential?
    Or coached beginners with advice they didn't have to unlearn later in order to improve?

    From what I've read from you over the years, the answer to all those questions is probably
    "no." I hope I'm mistaken, but unless I am you should really just shut up about giving
    racing/training advice.

    To the OP, the list from the link below is perhaps overkill, but it's useful in thinking about what
    is appropriate to bring to the race. The key elements for me are lots of clothes for warming up,
    racing and cooling down so the rider can be properly dressed in any likely weather, lots of food and
    drink for before, during and after the race, and a reliable bike.

    http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&safe=off&selm=W_cf7
    .556%24Vi.197937%40nntp1.onemain.com

    There are other informative things in that thread too.

    To me, it's really important to have a plan of roughly when to arrive, how long to warm up,
    how/when to survey the course, etc. Developing that sort of plan takes time -- so for starter make
    sure your wife is not rushed -- that adds too much stress. Getting to the race 1.5 to 2 hours early
    is wise I think.

    JT

    --
    *******************************************
    NB: reply-to address is munged

    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    *******************************************
     
  12. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    The problem with a heart rate monitor is that it scares hell out of you in a race. Heart rate
    monitors are training devices that are used to measure how EASY you're riding, not how hard. You
    automatically ride at your LT by trying to climb as fast as you can without blowing up. But riding
    easy requires some sort of instrument to convince you how easy 'easy' really is.

    In a race you're normally at or above your LT for the entire race. It's pretty disconcerting to see
    your heart rate 10 beats above LT on the fourth lap of a 45 minute crit. But without that heart rate
    monitor you can always think that you're below your LT.Sometimes ignornance is bliss.

    "Bob McBreen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I would add a bike computer & heart rate monitor. Great for
    training, and
    > knowing what is going on with your body during a race.
    >
    > "Boyd Speerschneider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > >
    > > > Hola,
    > > >
    > > > My wife just got into bike racing, is doing quite well, and is planning on racing a lot more.
    > > > For her upcoming brithday, I
    would
    > > > like to assemble of kit of bike racing 'must haves' for her.
    You can
    > > > assume she has the bike, various jersey's, helmet, etc... I'm
    just
    > > > looking for some ideas that are specific to preparing for, or
    riding
    > > > in, a race.
    > > >
    > > > Thanks,
    > > >
    > > > Kyle
    > >
    > > Must haves:
    > > 1) A racing license from USA Cycling.
    > > 2) A signed release form.
    > > 3) Money for entry fees. Paying in advance saves a late entry
    fee, but
    > > has some risk associated with it.
    > > 4) A properly adjusted, pumped up, lubricated, and tested
    bicycle*.
    > > 5) A suitcase of courage** =]
    > >
    > > Nice to haves (some specific to the hot Florida weather I race
    in):
    > > 1) Extra safety pins for pinning racing number to jersey***.
    > > 2) A trainer for warming up and cooling down.
    > > 3) Sun screen****.
    > > 4) A fold-up chair.
    > > 5) A tent or umbrella for shade.
    > > 6) Plenty to eat and drink pre, during, and post race. Bring a
    cooler if
    > > there is room.
    > > 7) A towel to change with.
    > > 8) A plastic bag to put your nasty, sweaty racing clothes in post
    race.
    > > 9) Some loot for whatever else you may need.
    > > 10) If staying overnight, an overnight kit with toothbrush,
    toothpaste,
    > > etc.
    > > 11) Clipless pedals and shoes.
    > > 12) If she is planning on sprinting, brifters (Shimano or Campy).
    > > 13) A extra set of light race-only wheels with a tight cogset.
    > > 14) A nice set of sunglasses.
    > > 15) A set of post race clothes, including a hat to cover up your
    helmet
    > > hair.
    > > 16) Some water to wash off post race.
    > > 17) Black socks and rain coat if it looks like rain (look at the
    weather
    > > on the weather channel or internet before you leave). Having the
    proper
    > > clothing can be the difference between having a great and terrible
    time.
    > >
    > > Hope this helps.
    > >
    > > - Boyd S.
    > >
    > > * Don't wait until the night before a race to do this stuff. ** Credit to Paul Sherwin *** I
    > > have a "lucky" set of stainless steel safety pins which
    won't
    > > leave a rust stain on my jersey if I forget to take them out for a
    while.
    > > **** Use a waterproof, sweatproof SPF 30-45 sunscreen which
    protects for
    > > both UVA and UVB.
    > >
     
  13. Mark Lee

    Mark Lee Guest

    "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hola,
    >
    > My wife just got into bike racing, is doing quite well, and is planning on racing a lot more. For
    > her upcoming brithday, I would like to assemble of kit of bike racing 'must haves' for her. You
    > can assume she has the bike, various jersey's, helmet, etc... I'm just looking for some ideas that
    > are specific to preparing for, or riding in, a race.
    >

    Slip-in sandals for walking around before and after. Cooler bag for water bottles. Small sports bag
    (or knapsack) for shoes, food, change of clothes, licence card. Rollers or wind trainer for warming
    up. Track pump (floor pump) with gauge. Tool box and kit. Spare wheels and tyres. Safety pins for
    when there aren't enough supplied with number. Mark Lee
     
  14. "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in news:0hVva.67547$ey1.6105132
    @newsread1.prod.itd.earthlink.net:

    > The problem with a heart rate monitor is that it scares hell out of you in a race. Heart rate
    > monitors are training devices that are used to measure how EASY you're riding, not how hard. You
    > automatically ride at your LT by trying to climb as fast as you can without blowing up. But riding
    > easy requires some sort of instrument to convince you how easy 'easy' really is.
    >
    > In a race you're normally at or above your LT for the entire race. It's pretty disconcerting to
    > see your heart rate 10 beats above LT on the fourth lap of a 45 minute crit. But without that
    > heart rate monitor you can always think that you're below your LT.Sometimes ignornance is bliss.

    <snip>

    For me, a heart rate monitor is a training tool only. I will wear it in a race, but I don't look at
    it or my computer. On the occassion that I'm in a break away, I might glance at my speed every once
    in a while just to make sure it isn't dropping off. Other than that, my eyes are to focused on the
    road and the riders in front of me to have time to look at this stuff during the race. I will look
    at it afterwards to see my max hr, speed, etc.

    Just my $0.02

    - Boyd S.
     
  15. "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in news:q4Vva.67517
    [email protected]:

    > Always have:
    >
    > Spare wheelset,

    Yup, for punctures.

    > Spare shoes,

    Do you have 4 feet?

    > Spare helmet,

    For your other head (no penis jokes please ;)?

    > Spare sunglasses,

    Do you have 4 eyes? Bring a set of sun glasses and a set of clear glasses for rainy or overcast
    conditions.

    > Spare gloves.

    I don't even have a non-spare set. I can't feel or grip the bars nearly as well with gloves; I guess
    its a personal preference.

    > There is nothing crappier than getting to a race feeling really good to find out that you forgot
    > your shoes. The spare stuff goes in a racing bax that always goes in the trunk for racing.

    That's why you have a checklist and pack your car on the eve of the race.

    > A trainer to warmup on is nice but not really necessary if you get there early enough.

    Sometimes it is necessary if there is no where to warm up.

    > Spare time is a big plus. If you do some of the housework then she can spend more time on the
    > bike. That makes a huge difference in performance.

    Yup.

    > Find her a local girls racing team. Girls are different than guys. We have fun training in a
    > gourp and all that but we can train alone and be fine. Women train much better in groups with a
    > group goal.

    I just love those "gourp" rides ;)

    > If your wife is serious a nice present is a year of coaching. This does make a big difference
    > if you're serious and will take the trouble to follow the advice. Otherwise it's just a waste
    > of money.

    If you yourself are a racer, you might save some loot by coaching her yourself. At least for
    the first season. Then if she likes it and sticks with it, a professional coach might help both
    you and her.

    - Boyd S.
     
  16. I just have to chime in here. In all the time I've been lurking in this newsgroup, this would have
    to be the most informative and useful thread I've experienced. Thanks everyone for the excellent
    contributions.

    Cheerz, Lynzz
     
  17. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The problem with a heart rate monitor is that it scares hell out of you in a race. Heart rate
    > monitors are training devices that are used to measure how EASY you're riding, not how hard. You
    > automatically ride at your LT by trying to climb as fast as you can without blowing up. But riding
    > easy requires some sort of instrument to convince you how easy 'easy' really is.
    >
    > In a race you're normally at or above your LT for the entire race. It's pretty disconcerting to
    > see your heart rate 10 beats above LT on the fourth lap of a 45 minute crit. But without that
    > heart rate monitor you can always think that you're below your LT.Sometimes ignornance is bliss.
    >
    >
    >
    I'll second the "ignorance is bliss" argument. What are you gonna do? Tell the pack, "Hey, y'all
    wait a minute, I'm over my LT?"

    Before I broke my HR monitor, I'd have it on, but turned upside down on the bars. At least then I
    could say after: "Hey, look I spent X min. over my LT!"

    Mike
     
  18. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Jeff Potter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Warm-up trainer seems overkill. Unless you also have a little sun-tent to
    go
    > with it. : ) How many places don't have ROADS to do a bit of warm-up on?
    The
    > others are good tips, tho. First-aid: yeah.
    >
    >
    I've done it both ways: with and without a trainer. When I've had a trainer to warm up on, I always
    end up warming up better than if I'm riding around the course. Usually, I'll do both. Warm up for
    45-60min on the trainer, then ride around on the road and do some out of the saddle jumps.

    When/if you're track racing, its almost mandatory to have some kind of trainer to warm up on.
    Often the "warmup tracks" are just for getting moving again after sitting around waiting for your
    next race.

    Seems to work well for me. The trainer doesn't have to be anything fancy. A fan unit's fine.

    Mike
     
  19. J999w

    J999w Guest

    >> Hola,
    >>
    >> My wife just got into bike racing, is doing quite well, and is planning on racing a lot more. For
    >> her upcoming brithday, I would like to assemble of kit of bike racing 'must haves' for her. You
    >> can assume she has the bike, various jersey's, helmet, etc... I'm just looking for some ideas
    >> that are specific to preparing for, or riding in, a race.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Kyle

    Life Support Pack:

    Bunch O'pins. Sun Screen. Massage oil. Maps. Packets of Gatorade or similar Few Cliff Bars or
    similar. M&M's, Oreos, similar for those 'bad race' days. Extra coin for an emergency soda.
    Disposable camera for those long drives or road races. Portable CD case. Rain jacket, arm warmers,
    leg warmers.

    Tool box items: Old beer six pack container for storing water bottles. Few toe straps for
    'strapping' stuff. Roll of electrical tape taping stuff. Spoke wrench! Chain tool. Mini mag light
    for map reading.

    First Aid Kit: "Spandage" = that stretchy net stuff to hold bandages on with. Don't ask me where to
    get it though, I have to 'borrow' mine from work. "Tegaderm" -get the big ones. It's like 'Sheet
    tape'. Very thin, very sticky. Handy wipes for post race or grease clean up. Hydrogen Peroxide for
    cleaning those scrapes.

    jw milwaukee

    jw milwaukee
     
  20. Mike Murray

    Mike Murray Guest

    "Boyd Speerschneider" <[email protected]> wrote
    > Must haves:
    > 1) A racing license from USA Cycling.

    Only if you are in an area that has no other alternative. Not needed here in Oregon.

    Boyd furhter writes:
    > Nice to haves (some specific to the hot Florida weather I race in):....
    > 3) Sun screen****.

    Unfortunately also not often needed here in Oregon.

    --
    Mike Murray
     
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