Radio Transmitter for frame??? or silent alarm? or something?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Anders, Feb 28, 2004.

  1. Anders

    Anders Guest

    HEY

    Isn't there a product like that somewhere on the market? Place a radiotransmitter inside the frame
    or some where on the bike, and then IF someone steals it, you can track the bike VIA the
    transmitter?

    That is off course if the bike hasn't already been shipped to eastern europe or somewhere...

    But isn't there something like that? or what about a silent alarm, that sends a signal to you when
    somebody tries to steal your bike? You could place the device on the bike or the lock or something,
    and when something happens, then the alarm sends a signal to a mobil device that buzzez or beeps,
    and then you can run to your bike and beat the hell outta that thief!

    Smart devices taht work, anyone?!?!

    Sincerely Anders
     
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  2. Anders says:

    >and then you can run to your bike and beat the hell outta that thief!

    Assuming you are bigger and faster and nastier than he is. ;-)
     
  3. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    There would be a market for such a device, if it was cheap enough. LoJack for cars has a monthly
    fee, though, and I'm sure it's quite expensive to install. The problem that I see is that there
    aren't many places on a bike to hide a radio transmitter, and the thief would probably be able to
    find it and disable it before you could track down the bike.

    OTOH, if you were able to install it deep within the frame's tubing, you could probably make it
    work. Even a better idea is for custom frame builders to offer the installation of such a device as
    an option to their customers... they could install the transmitter in the tubes before brazing or
    welding and make it extremely difficult to remove.

    Your bike still wouldn't be safe from parts stripping, but I think most thieves would prefer to
    quickly take the whole bike than waste time unbolting the bits.

    -John Morgan
     
  4. Westie

    Westie Guest

    Things to consider would be battery life of the transmitter, and consequently access to the battery,
    and the potential for disabling it. Range would be another. it'd need to be fairly powerful to reach
    a dedicated antenna but then it could use GPS and/or cellphone technology and phone home! If it uses
    GPS there is the problem of where and how to mount the antenna array.
    --
    Westie (Replace 'invalid' with 'yahoo' when replying.)
     
  5. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >But isn't there something like that? or what about a silent alarm, that

    I prefer the saddle-mounted device that causes anal electrocution of unauthorized riders.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  6. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    > http://www.bicyclealarm.com/

    I think that device, combined with a lock or two, would deter the average thief. Once they got
    through the lock they would have a bike chirping at them at 100 dB.

    OTOH, people don't pay attention to alarms. When you have heard a car alarm and actually looked to
    see what was happening? Worse still, if someone saw a thief riding on a chirping bicycle, would they
    do anything about it? They might just look the other way.

    -John Morgan
     
  7. Tetsuo Shima

    Tetsuo Shima Guest

    "John Morgan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > http://www.bicyclealarm.com/
    >
    > I think that device, combined with a lock or two, would deter the average thief. Once they got
    > through the lock they would have a bike chirping at them at 100 dB.
    >
    > OTOH, people don't pay attention to alarms. When you have heard a car alarm and actually looked to
    > see what was happening? Worse still, if someone saw a thief riding on a chirping bicycle, would
    > they do anything about it? They might just look the other way.
    >
    > -John Morgan
    >
    >
    But if they're still in reasonable close proximity, you'd be able to hear them which
    matters more. :)
     
  8. On 2004-02-29, John Morgan penned:
    >> http://www.bicyclealarm.com/
    >
    > I think that device, combined with a lock or two, would deter the average thief. Once they got
    > through the lock they would have a bike chirping at them at 100 dB.
    >
    > OTOH, people don't pay attention to alarms. When you have heard a car alarm and actually looked to
    > see what was happening? Worse still, if someone saw a thief riding on a chirping bicycle, would
    > they do anything about it? They might just look the other way.
    >

    I agree ... car alarms go off all the time because someone bumped the car, or came within its
    comfort zone, or whatever. My only reaction on hearing a car alarm these days is, "Someone shut that
    goddamn thing OFF!"

    --
    monique
     
  9. Jjg

    Jjg Guest

    On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 11:28:56 +1300, "Westie"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Things to consider would be battery life of the transmitter, and consequently access to the
    >battery, and the potential for disabling it. Range would be another. it'd need to be fairly
    >powerful to reach a dedicated antenna but then it could use GPS and/or cellphone technology and
    >phone home! If it uses GPS there is the problem of where and how to mount the antenna array.

    One small problem , If you put a radio reciever/transmitter inside a Metal Frame , it will be unbale
    to send or recieve signals , because it will be insdie what is called faraday Cage, one of the laws
    of physics regauridng electromagnitism.

    JJG
     
  10. nckies

    nckies Guest

    It's been done. I saw a news show where they left this bike in various places and filmed it being
    stolen. They used a transmitter to track it when it got away from them. One thing they said is the
    transmitter had a limited range.

    That means you run into a secondary problem. IF you don't discover your bike is stolen soom enough
    you may not find it or at least have to do a lot of driving to find it.

    On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 10:45:22 +0100, "Anders" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >HEY
    >
    >Isn't there a product like that somewhere on the market? Place a radiotransmitter inside the frame
    >or some where on the bike, and then IF someone steals it, you can track the bike VIA the
    >transmitter?
    >
    >That is off course if the bike hasn't already been shipped to eastern europe or somewhere...
    >
    >But isn't there something like that? or what about a silent alarm, that sends a signal to you when
    >somebody tries to steal your bike? You could place the device on the bike or the lock or something,
    >and when something happens, then the alarm sends a signal to a mobil device that buzzez or beeps,
    >and then you can run to your bike and beat the hell outta that thief!
    >
    >Smart devices taht work, anyone?!?!
    >
    >Sincerely Anders
     
  11. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    "JJG" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 11:28:56 +1300, "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Things to consider would be battery life of the transmitter, and consequently access to the
    > >battery, and the potential for disabling it. Range would be another. it'd need to be fairly
    > >powerful to reach a dedicated antenna but then it could use GPS and/or cellphone technology
    and
    > >phone home! If it uses GPS there is the problem of where and how to
    mount
    > >the antenna array.
    >
    > One small problem , If you put a radio reciever/transmitter inside a Metal Frame , it will be
    > unbale to send or recieve signals , because it will be insdie what is called faraday Cage, one of
    > the laws of physics regauridng electromagnitism.

    Should be able to get away with that by creating a virtual ground, then using the frame as antenna
    live (since it's not at earth).

    Shaun aRe
     
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