Raised junctions



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Lardy Ninja

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This is slightly off topic but does anyone know why when side roads meet a main road, the junctions
are sometimes raised to the same level as the pavement? This is supposed to be a safety feature but
I have no idea what makes it safer than a normal junction where the road stays below the the
pavement level. Any ideas or links to research?

LN
 
G

Geraint Jones

Guest
[email protected] (lardy ninja) wrote: ( This is slightly off topic but does anyone know why when
side roads ) meet a main road, the junctions are sometimes raised to the same level ( as the
pavement? This is supposed to be a safety feature but I have no ) idea what makes it safer than a
normal junction where the road stays ( below the the pavement level. Any ideas or links to research?

The intention is apparently both the psychological effect of a gate, and the speed limiting effect
of what I am old enough to know as a sleeping policeman. The technical term for this traffic
calming is an "entry treatment", and what you have is a raised entry treatment. See "vertical
deflections" at:

http://www.roads.dft.gov.uk/roadnetwork/ditm/tal/traffic/02_94/index.htm#vertical
 
I

Ianb

Guest
"lardy ninja" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> This is slightly off topic but does anyone know why when side roads meet a main road, the
> junctions are sometimes raised to the same level as the pavement? This is supposed to be a safety
> feature but I have no idea what makes it safer than a normal junction where the road stays below
> the the pavement level. Any ideas or links to research?
>
> LN

Yes it is "safety" for when the car driver swerves to avoid that stealth cyclist he will not damage
his cars suspension on the council owned Kerb!

Ian B
 
L

-Lsqnot Respond

Guest
On 11 Mar 2003 05:08:41 -0800, [email protected] (lardy ninja) wrote:

>This is slightly off topic but does anyone know why when side roads meet a main road, the junctions
>are sometimes raised to the same level as the pavement? This is supposed to be a safety feature but
>I have no idea what makes it safer than a normal junction where the road stays below the the
>pavement level. Any ideas or links to research?
>
>LN

It's known as a plateau junction. The idea is that perceived priority and convenience is returned to
pedestrians. ie No bumping up and down at each junction. Safety benefit derives from the
driver/cyclist/road user feeling he/she is moving into ped territory rather than peds feeling
intimidated by having to move into car territory.
 
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