Raised Seat Post - Cycling Position

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by aziraphale77, May 17, 2015.

  1. aziraphale77

    aziraphale77 New Member

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    When I bought my bike a while back, I followed all the measurements recommended by the manufacturer for frame size and positioning. When the bike arrived I tested these positions and found them mostly suitable - allowing me to go on long rides (40 miles +) without any discomfort.

    However I felt that my saddle was too low and raised it until I felt more comfortable - in total about an inch and a half.

    I justified this with my typical foot position - toes slightly pointing downwards as I pedal.

    My knees are still slightly bent when the pedal is fully extended to the bottom. When the feet are at level height, the forward leg is pretty much vertical, which I believe to be the correct position.

    Today someone told me, that my pelvis is rocking too much due to this setup and recommended I lower the saddle a bit. I don't notice this motion when I ride, but wonder if it is something I should take into consideration.

    I currently aim to cycle 100km a week, but hope to reach 200 by the end of the season, so am worried that something bad may be creeping in.
     
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  2. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    I can't tell for sure this is happening, because I'm not watching you ride the bike. But if your friend says he's seeing it, I'm sure he's seeing something that needs attention.

    That's why when I test fit saddle height, I have the rider extend one knee fully and drop the heel, while keeping the hips level. Then I can see very clearly if the hip is being dropped.

    The ideal saddle height is high enough to give you power on the downstroke but low enough to allow your legs to spin the cranks freely without the sensation of stretching or pointing the toe or rocking the hips to complete the downstroke. You should also not have the sensation of being suspended from the saddle inserted in your crotch. The saddle supports the pelvis, but it does not take all of its weight.

    On a related note, about spinning the cranks--at whatever your cruising cadence may be, if you can't squeeze a few more rpm out of your legs at will, your gear and/or your saddle are probably too high.

    Lower the saddle to where you can spin with level hips, get use to how it feels, then try raising it gradually to where the hips start rocking. Then lower it to where it was.
     
  3. Damien Lee

    Damien Lee Active Member

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    A mate of mine rides with his seat in a very raised position. But then again, he's a very tall fellow and finds that this position suits him just fine. As I'm shorter than him, I just can't ride with my seat raised so high, and it also feels quite uncomfortable.
     
  4. Corzhens

    Corzhens Well-Known Member

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    My rule in buying a bike or a saddle is to try it out for size. It is not just the height of the rider or even the weight that is a factor in a saddle. I think the strong factor is the posture and the style of riding. So the best way in getting a good saddle is to try it out, ride for a kilometer or so and it is better if there is a climb so you can get a feel of your saddle in that situation. Riding is best when you are comfortable with the saddle.
     
  5. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Goes without saying.

    The problem is about finding the right saddle height for ones leg and foot length. And if one needs to ride with pointed toes or rocking the hips to reach the pedals at the bottom of the stroke, then one's saddle is too high. A saddle too high can lead to discomfort, chafing, boils, loss of circulation, and pinched nerves in the crotch, and it can lead one into bad pedaling form that can lead to knee injury.

    On the other hand, a saddle that's a little (not a lot) too low, tempered with good pedaling form, is pretty benign.
     
  6. Hozybo

    Hozybo New Member

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    You can get someone else to watch you and give their recommendations. Or you could let them ride the bike and give you their sincere output.

    People have different ways if riding. Some rock their hips right to left. Some use their foot strength.
     
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