Re: 99% of cyclists do not ride in the bike lane so

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Hayvern, Jan 14, 2006.

  1. Hayvern

    Hayvern Guest

    Hey, come on man, I don't go to your job and kick the shovel out of
    your hands, or to your wife's work and jump on the bed!
     
    Tags:


  2. Hayvern wrote:
    > Hey, come on man, I don't go to your job and kick the shovel out of
    > your hands, or jump on your wife in bed.


    vforvivictory
     
  3. Misàjourle wrote:
    > Hayvern wrote:
    > > Hey, come on man, I don't go to your job and kick the shovel out of
    > > your hands, or jump on your wife in bed.

    >
    > vforvivictory


    Have you thought of being a speech writer for our president? I think
    the way your mind works and your style is right up his ally.
    Miller
     
  4. Nuckin' Futz

    Nuckin' Futz Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Have you thought of being a speech writer for our president? I think
    > the way your mind works and your style is right up his ally.


    As opposed to, say, Ted Kennedy? Elmer Fundt meets Foster Brooks. (He
    could mix paints with those shaky hands.)

    "MaryJo unavailable for comment"... NF
     
  5. Nuckin' Futz wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > Have you thought of being a speech writer for our president? I think
    > > the way your mind works and your style is right up his ally.

    >
    > As opposed to, say, Ted Kennedy? Elmer Fundt meets Foster Brooks. (He
    > could mix paints with those shaky hands.)
    >
    > "MaryJo unavailable for comment"... NF


    Michael Douglas of Midland, Texas unavailable for comment:
    <http://www.snopes.com/politics/bush/laura.asp>.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
     
  6. Nuckin' Futz

    Nuckin' Futz Guest

    Johnny Sunset wrote:
    > Nuckin' Futz wrote:
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>> Have you thought of being a speech writer for our president? I think
    >>> the way your mind works and your style is right up his ally.

    >>
    >> As opposed to, say, Ted Kennedy? Elmer Fundt meets Foster Brooks.
    >> (He could mix paints with those shaky hands.)
    >>
    >> "MaryJo unavailable for comment"... NF

    >
    > Michael Douglas of Midland, Texas unavailable for comment:
    > <http://www.snopes.com/politics/bush/laura.asp>.



    So you equate a tragic accident (at age 17) with being blind drunk AND
    trying to cover up your crime? http://www.ytedk.com/

    His performance in the Alito hearing was ALMOST as shameful. Reading some
    obscure article (which turned out to be /satire/ by the way) and trying to
    link it to the nominee. Why is it that Democrats can practice "guilt by
    (nonexistent) association", call African American conservatives names like
    Uncle Tom, House N*gg*r, etc., and get a total pass; while a Republican says
    one thing and is pilloried unmercifully (e.g., Trent Lott). And of course
    there's always KKK Byrd...

    THROW THE HYPOCRITES OUT! (A la doltish D'ohBoy.)

    NF

    PS: "Kennedy earned C grades at the private Milton Academy, but was
    admitted to Harvard as a "legacy" -- his father and older brothers had
    attended there, so the younger and dimmer Kennedy's admission was virtually
    assured. While attending, he was expelled twice, once for cheating on a
    test, and once for paying a classmate to cheat for him." (From
    http://www.nndb.com/people/623/000023554/)

    PSS: Hillary and Harry Belafonte! Think anyone will associate THEM?!?
    (And if the Bush US is such a fascist state, why the hell is he even allowed
    back in the country?)
     
  7. Nuckin' Futz

    Nuckin' Futz Guest

    Nuckin' Futz wrote:
    > PS: "Kennedy earned C grades at the private Milton Academy, but was
    > admitted to Harvard as a "legacy" -- his father and older brothers had
    > attended there, so the younger and dimmer Kennedy's admission was
    > virtually assured. While attending, he was expelled twice, once for
    > cheating on a test, and once for paying a classmate to cheat for
    > him." (From http://www.nndb.com/people/623/000023554/)


    Heck, the rest of it is a pretty fun read, too:
    "While expelled, Kennedy enlisted in the Army, but mistakenly signed up for
    four years instead of two. His father, Joseph P. Kennedy, then U.S.
    Ambassador to England, pulled the necessary strings to have his enlistment
    shortened to two years, and to ensure that he served in Europe, not Korea,
    where a war was raging. Kennedy was assigned to Paris, never advanced beyond
    the rank of Private, and returned to Harvard upon being discharged.

    While attending law school at the University of Virginia, he was cited for
    reckless driving four times, including once when he was clocked driving 90
    miles per hour in a residential neighborhood with his headlights off after
    dark. Yet his Virginia driver's license was never revoked. He passed the bar
    exam in 1959, and two years later was appointed an Assistant to the District
    Attorney in Massachusetts' Suffolk County.

    In 1962, at age 30 (Constitutionally, the minimum age to hold a Senate seat)
    he ran for the Senate. His timing was perfect -- his brother John had given
    up the seat to become President, and Kennedy easily won the office. He was
    re-elected in 1964, 1970, 1976, 1982, 1988, 1994, and 2000.

    In 1964, he was seriously injured in a plane crash, and hospitalized for
    several months. His sister Kathleen and nephew "John John" were killed in
    separate plane crashes.

    On July 19, 1969, Kennedy attended a party on Chappaquiddick Island in
    Massachusetts. At about 11:00 PM, he borrowed his chauffeur's keys to his
    Oldsmobile limousine, and offered to give a ride home to Mary Jo Kopechne, a
    campaign worker. Leaving the island via an unlit, narrow, rickety wooden
    bridge, Kennedy steered the car off the bridge and into Poucha Pond.

    He swam to shore and walked back to the party -- passing several houses and
    a fire station -- and two friends returned with him to the scene of the
    accident. According to their later testimony, they told him what he already
    knew, that he was required by law to immediately report the accident to the
    authorities. Instead Kennedy made his way to his hotel, called his lawyer,
    and went to sleep.

    Kennedy called the police the next morning. By then the wreck had already
    been discovered. Before dying, Kopechne had scratched at the upholstered
    floor above her head in the upside-down car. The Kennedy family began
    pulling strings, ensuring that any inquiry would be contained. Her corpse
    was whisked out-of-state to her family, before an autopsy could be
    conducted.

    Further details are uncertain, but after the accident Kennedy says he
    repeatedly dove under the water trying to rescue Kopechne, and he didn't
    call police because he was in a state of shock. In versions not so kind, it
    is widely assumed Kennedy was drunk, that he was having an affair with
    Kopechne, and/or that he held off calling police in hopes that his family
    could fix the problem overnight.

    Since the accident, Kennedy's political enemies have referred to him as the
    distinguished Senator from Chappaquiddick, or worse. He pled guilty to
    leaving the scene of an accident, and was given a suspended sentence of two
    months. Kopechne's family received a small payout from the Kennedy's
    insurance policy, and never sued. There was later an effort to have her body
    exhumed and autopsied, but her family successfully fought against this in
    court, and Kennedy's family paid their attorney's bills.

    In 1973, at the height of Nixon's Watergate scandal, Kennedy thundered from
    the Senate floor, "Do we operate under a system of equal justice under law?
    Or is there one system for the average citizen and another for the high and
    mighty?"

    In 1980, Kennedy challenged Carter, his own party's sitting President, for
    the Democratic nomination. Kennedy's bid was hampered by questions of
    Chappaquiddick and by an interview with CBS Newsman Roger Mudd, who asked
    the straightforward question, "Why do you want to be President?" Kennedy
    couldn't come up with a straightforward answer. Carter was nominated for
    re-election, but the party's divisions contributed to the victory won by
    Reagan.

    In a late-1980s media profile, Kennedy was succinctly described as someone
    who "grew to manhood without learning to be an adult." He is rumored to have
    had several affairs while married to his first wife, and had often been seen
    in public while thoroughly tanked and/or behaving obnoxiously. In 1987 he
    was caught in flagrante delicto with an unidentified woman on the floor of a
    restaurant. His public image since the early 1990s and during his second
    marriage has been more conservative and restrained."

    Some would say "shaky".

    NF
     
  8. HH

    HH Guest

    "Nuckin' Futz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Nuckin' Futz wrote:
    >> PS: "Kennedy earned C grades at the private Milton Academy, but was
    >> admitted to Harvard as a "legacy" -- his father and older brothers had
    >> attended there, so the younger and dimmer Kennedy's admission was
    >> virtually assured. While attending, he was expelled twice, once for
    >> cheating on a test, and once for paying a classmate to cheat for
    >> him." (From http://www.nndb.com/people/623/000023554/)

    >
    > Heck, the rest of it is a pretty fun read, too:
    > "While expelled, Kennedy enlisted in the Army, but mistakenly signed up
    > for four years instead of two. His father, Joseph P. Kennedy, then U.S.
    > Ambassador to England, pulled the necessary strings to have his enlistment
    > shortened to two years, and to ensure that he served in Europe, not Korea,
    > where a war was raging. Kennedy was assigned to Paris, never advanced
    > beyond the rank of Private, and returned to Harvard upon being discharged.
    >
    > While attending law school at the University of Virginia, he was cited for
    > reckless driving four times, including once when he was clocked driving 90
    > miles per hour in a residential neighborhood with his headlights off after
    > dark. Yet his Virginia driver's license was never revoked. He passed the
    > bar exam in 1959, and two years later was appointed an Assistant to the
    > District Attorney in Massachusetts' Suffolk County.
    >
    > In 1962, at age 30 (Constitutionally, the minimum age to hold a Senate
    > seat) he ran for the Senate. His timing was perfect -- his brother John
    > had given up the seat to become President, and Kennedy easily won the
    > office. He was re-elected in 1964, 1970, 1976, 1982, 1988, 1994, and 2000.
    >
    > In 1964, he was seriously injured in a plane crash, and hospitalized for
    > several months. His sister Kathleen and nephew "John John" were killed in
    > separate plane crashes.
    >
    > On July 19, 1969, Kennedy attended a party on Chappaquiddick Island in
    > Massachusetts. At about 11:00 PM, he borrowed his chauffeur's keys to his
    > Oldsmobile limousine, and offered to give a ride home to Mary Jo Kopechne,
    > a campaign worker. Leaving the island via an unlit, narrow, rickety wooden
    > bridge, Kennedy steered the car off the bridge and into Poucha Pond.
    >
    > He swam to shore and walked back to the party -- passing several houses
    > and a fire station -- and two friends returned with him to the scene of
    > the accident. According to their later testimony, they told him what he
    > already knew, that he was required by law to immediately report the
    > accident to the authorities. Instead Kennedy made his way to his hotel,
    > called his lawyer, and went to sleep.
    >
    > Kennedy called the police the next morning. By then the wreck had already
    > been discovered. Before dying, Kopechne had scratched at the upholstered
    > floor above her head in the upside-down car. The Kennedy family began
    > pulling strings, ensuring that any inquiry would be contained. Her corpse
    > was whisked out-of-state to her family, before an autopsy could be
    > conducted.
    >
    > Further details are uncertain, but after the accident Kennedy says he
    > repeatedly dove under the water trying to rescue Kopechne, and he didn't
    > call police because he was in a state of shock. In versions not so kind,
    > it is widely assumed Kennedy was drunk, that he was having an affair with
    > Kopechne, and/or that he held off calling police in hopes that his family
    > could fix the problem overnight.
    >
    > Since the accident, Kennedy's political enemies have referred to him as
    > the distinguished Senator from Chappaquiddick, or worse. He pled guilty to
    > leaving the scene of an accident, and was given a suspended sentence of
    > two months. Kopechne's family received a small payout from the Kennedy's
    > insurance policy, and never sued. There was later an effort to have her
    > body exhumed and autopsied, but her family successfully fought against
    > this in court, and Kennedy's family paid their attorney's bills.
    >
    > In 1973, at the height of Nixon's Watergate scandal, Kennedy thundered
    > from the Senate floor, "Do we operate under a system of equal justice
    > under law? Or is there one system for the average citizen and another for
    > the high and mighty?"
    >
    > In 1980, Kennedy challenged Carter, his own party's sitting President, for
    > the Democratic nomination. Kennedy's bid was hampered by questions of
    > Chappaquiddick and by an interview with CBS Newsman Roger Mudd, who asked
    > the straightforward question, "Why do you want to be President?" Kennedy
    > couldn't come up with a straightforward answer. Carter was nominated for
    > re-election, but the party's divisions contributed to the victory won by
    > Reagan.
    >
    > In a late-1980s media profile, Kennedy was succinctly described as someone
    > who "grew to manhood without learning to be an adult." He is rumored to
    > have had several affairs while married to his first wife, and had often
    > been seen in public while thoroughly tanked and/or behaving obnoxiously.
    > In 1987 he was caught in flagrante delicto with an unidentified woman on
    > the floor of a restaurant. His public image since the early 1990s and
    > during his second marriage has been more conservative and restrained."
    >
    > Some would say "shaky".
    >
    > NF
    >
    >


    Just the other night I heard on cable TV that Teddy is considered to be a
    Lion of the Democratic Party. Somehow Teddy the Lion doesn't sound quite
    right. But if he really was a lion we could just take him to a vet and have
    him put to sleep. That way we would not have to listen to one of his
    morality lectures ever again. Wouldn't that be nice.
     
  9. HH wrote:
    > "Nuckin' Futz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Nuckin' Futz wrote:
    > >> PS: "Kennedy earned C grades at the private Milton Academy, but was
    > >> admitted to Harvard as a "legacy" -- his father and older brothers had
    > >> attended there, so the younger and dimmer Kennedy's admission was
    > >> virtually assured. While attending, he was expelled twice, once for
    > >> cheating on a test, and once for paying a classmate to cheat for
    > >> him." (From http://www.nndb.com/people/623/000023554/)

    > >
    > > Heck, the rest of it is a pretty fun read, too:
    > > "While expelled, Kennedy enlisted in the Army, but mistakenly signed up
    > > for four years instead of two. His father, Joseph P. Kennedy, then U.S.
    > > Ambassador to England, pulled the necessary strings to have his enlistment
    > > shortened to two years, and to ensure that he served in Europe, not Korea,
    > > where a war was raging. Kennedy was assigned to Paris, never advanced
    > > beyond the rank of Private, and returned to Harvard upon being discharged.
    > >
    > > While attending law school at the University of Virginia, he was cited for
    > > reckless driving four times, including once when he was clocked driving 90
    > > miles per hour in a residential neighborhood with his headlights off after
    > > dark. Yet his Virginia driver's license was never revoked. He passed the
    > > bar exam in 1959, and two years later was appointed an Assistant to the
    > > District Attorney in Massachusetts' Suffolk County.
    > >
    > > In 1962, at age 30 (Constitutionally, the minimum age to hold a Senate
    > > seat) he ran for the Senate. His timing was perfect -- his brother John
    > > had given up the seat to become President, and Kennedy easily won the
    > > office. He was re-elected in 1964, 1970, 1976, 1982, 1988, 1994, and 2000.
    > >
    > > In 1964, he was seriously injured in a plane crash, and hospitalized for
    > > several months. His sister Kathleen and nephew "John John" were killed in
    > > separate plane crashes.
    > >
    > > On July 19, 1969, Kennedy attended a party on Chappaquiddick Island in
    > > Massachusetts. At about 11:00 PM, he borrowed his chauffeur's keys to his
    > > Oldsmobile limousine, and offered to give a ride home to Mary Jo Kopechne,
    > > a campaign worker. Leaving the island via an unlit, narrow, rickety wooden
    > > bridge, Kennedy steered the car off the bridge and into Poucha Pond.
    > >
    > > He swam to shore and walked back to the party -- passing several houses
    > > and a fire station -- and two friends returned with him to the scene of
    > > the accident. According to their later testimony, they told him what he
    > > already knew, that he was required by law to immediately report the
    > > accident to the authorities. Instead Kennedy made his way to his hotel,
    > > called his lawyer, and went to sleep.
    > >
    > > Kennedy called the police the next morning. By then the wreck had already
    > > been discovered. Before dying, Kopechne had scratched at the upholstered
    > > floor above her head in the upside-down car. The Kennedy family began
    > > pulling strings, ensuring that any inquiry would be contained. Her corpse
    > > was whisked out-of-state to her family, before an autopsy could be
    > > conducted.
    > >
    > > Further details are uncertain, but after the accident Kennedy says he
    > > repeatedly dove under the water trying to rescue Kopechne, and he didn't
    > > call police because he was in a state of shock. In versions not so kind,
    > > it is widely assumed Kennedy was drunk, that he was having an affair with
    > > Kopechne, and/or that he held off calling police in hopes that his family
    > > could fix the problem overnight.
    > >
    > > Since the accident, Kennedy's political enemies have referred to him as
    > > the distinguished Senator from Chappaquiddick, or worse. He pled guilty to
    > > leaving the scene of an accident, and was given a suspended sentence of
    > > two months. Kopechne's family received a small payout from the Kennedy's
    > > insurance policy, and never sued. There was later an effort to have her
    > > body exhumed and autopsied, but her family successfully fought against
    > > this in court, and Kennedy's family paid their attorney's bills.
    > >
    > > In 1973, at the height of Nixon's Watergate scandal, Kennedy thundered
    > > from the Senate floor, "Do we operate under a system of equal justice
    > > under law? Or is there one system for the average citizen and another for
    > > the high and mighty?"
    > >
    > > In 1980, Kennedy challenged Carter, his own party's sitting President, for
    > > the Democratic nomination. Kennedy's bid was hampered by questions of
    > > Chappaquiddick and by an interview with CBS Newsman Roger Mudd, who asked
    > > the straightforward question, "Why do you want to be President?" Kennedy
    > > couldn't come up with a straightforward answer. Carter was nominated for
    > > re-election, but the party's divisions contributed to the victory won by
    > > Reagan.
    > >
    > > In a late-1980s media profile, Kennedy was succinctly described as someone
    > > who "grew to manhood without learning to be an adult." He is rumored to
    > > have had several affairs while married to his first wife, and had often
    > > been seen in public while thoroughly tanked and/or behaving obnoxiously.
    > > In 1987 he was caught in flagrante delicto with an unidentified woman on
    > > the floor of a restaurant. His public image since the early 1990s and
    > > during his second marriage has been more conservative and restrained."
    > >
    > > Some would say "shaky".
    > >
    > > NF
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Just the other night I heard on cable TV that Teddy is considered to be a
    > Lion of the Democratic Party.


    and in the water - he swims in the nude.
     
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