Re; ADHD Are Drugs Working?

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Jan, Apr 8, 2004.

  1. Jan

    Jan Guest

    http://www.ivanhoe.com/channels/p_channelstory.cfm?storyid=8444

    Reported April 8, 2004

    ADHD Treatment: Are Drugs Working?
    (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Stimulant medications benefit children with ADHD, but the
    benefits may not last and could have side effects. Two current studies focus on
    this issue.

    One study shows drugs for ADHD are effective but may cause mild growth
    suppression in children. The second study shows taking stimulants has
    beneficial effects even after families pursue other treatments. However, that
    study also shows some children lose the initial benefits after two years.

    The research on ADHD is limited and has not looked at long-term outcomes in
    groups. These two studies from the National Institute of Mental Health
    Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD focus on follow-up data from patients after
    two years.

    The first study looked at overall symptoms and side effects on growth. The
    participants were part of four groups. One group took medication the entire two
    years, and another group did not take any medication at all. Another group took
    medications for 14 months and then went off it for 10 months while a fourth
    group did the exact opposite.

    Researchers found stopping medication after 14 months resulted in the biggest
    deterioration. The group on no medication showed modest deterioration. The
    group that started medication showed the most improvement in symptoms.
    Furthermore, the group that was on medication the entire time had a reduced
    height gain compared with the group never on medication.

    In the second study, researchers looked at benefits seen after 10 months on a
    stimulant to see if these benefits were still present 14 months later.
    Researchers report children who were initially on the drug maintained some
    benefits even if they went off the drug. However, some children lost some of
    the initial benefits over time.
     
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  2. "Jan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > http://www.ivanhoe.com/channels/p_channelstory.cfm?storyid=8444
    >
    > Reported April 8, 2004
    >
    > ADHD Treatment: Are Drugs Working?


    Based on the article Jan posted, they sure are. Note the emphasis I add:


    > (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Stimulant medications benefit children with ADHD,

    but the
    > benefits may not last and could have side effects. Two current studies

    focus on
    > this issue.
    >
    > One study shows drugs for ADHD are effective but may cause mild growth
    > suppression in children. The second study shows taking stimulants has
    > beneficial effects even after families pursue other treatments. However,

    that
    > study also shows some children lose the initial benefits after two years.
    >
    > The research on ADHD is limited and has not looked at long-term outcomes

    in
    > groups. These two studies from the National Institute of Mental Health
    > Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD focus on follow-up data from patients

    after
    > two years.
    >
    > The first study looked at overall symptoms and side effects on growth. The
    > participants were part of four groups. One group took medication the

    entire two
    > years, and another group did not take any medication at all. Another group

    took
    > medications for 14 months and then went off it for 10 months while a

    fourth
    > group did the exact opposite.
    >
    > Researchers found stopping medication after 14 months resulted in the

    biggest
    > deterioration. The group on no medication showed modest deterioration.


    ***************
    The
    > group that started medication showed the most improvement in symptoms.

    ***************

    > Furthermore, the group that was on medication the entire time had a

    reduced
    > height gain compared with the group never on medication.


    > In the second study, researchers looked at benefits seen after 10 months

    on a
    > stimulant to see if these benefits were still present 14 months later.
    > Researchers report children who were initially on the drug maintained some
    > benefits even if they went off the drug. However, some children lost some

    of
    > the initial benefits over time.


    Which is not uncommon in all areas of education. Those people who have use
    neurofeedback that I have spoken with report that they see an initial
    benefit which deteriorates with time, so they take refresher sessions.

    A rather normal response.
     
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