Re: Advice on MTB purchase

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simon Brooke, Sep 4, 2004.

  1. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, blackbat
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Thanks all for your replies, if my nascent cycling hobby does blossom
    > I can see me getting to know this group well.
    >
    > I found out that the Cyclone has 1.5 slick tyres, I didn't know they
    > were slicks. I also mentioned that if I opted for the Cyclone with
    > it's quick release wheels I could get another set of wheels with
    > gnarly tyres and have the best of both worlds. At this point the guy
    > said that he uses a Ridgeback (Nemesis?) for road use but has upgraded
    > it to disk brakes as that years model didn't have them as standard. To
    > do this he abandoned the original wheels as they didn't accept disk
    > brakes. He said they would have cost approx £140 new (his Ridgeback
    > was a better spec bike than the Cyclone) & offered to sell them for
    > £30 with used 2" gnarly tyres.
    >
    > What d'ya think? Seems like a good idea but I'd liked to have at least
    > seen the MX35.


    If you're happy with the bike, bite his hand off. That's a good price
    for a pair of wheels and tyres, and if they're coming from a reputable
    cycle shop owner they should be reasonably OK. The spec on the bike
    also looks not bad for the price.

    > Just a question on geometry - a MTB seems to have a more upright
    > set-up than the urban/road, the bars higher than the saddle. Is this
    > to generate more power by leaning forward on the road bikes or purely
    > for comfort on the MTB?


    No. Serious mountain bikes[1], like all serious diamond frame bikes,
    have the handlebars level with or lower than the saddle. They need to
    be both for aerodynamics and, I believe, also for power. What you're
    seeing is hardtail bikes with the suspension uncompressed. In use it
    will compress about 25% to 30% of its total travel just from the rider
    weight, and this will bring the front down. Also many modern mountain
    bikes have exceedingly 'compact' frame geometry and are designed to be
    ridden with a lot of seatpost showing.

    [1] Except specialist downhill bikes, which are not really intended to
    be pedalled very far anyway and are more like engineless motor bikes.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; better than your average performing pineapple
     
    Tags:


  2. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, blackbat
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > The guy in the shop said the cyclone had nine sprockets but the wheels
    > he might sell me have eight. He said it's not a prob as they are the
    > same size cassette - does this sound right?


    Yes. I have an eight speed shifter on my Mantra but a nine speed
    cassette. This of course means I can't select my highest gear but as
    it's mostly a messing about bike anyway it's not too much of a problem.
    If you put an eight speed cassette onto a bike that's set up for a nine
    speed one then you will have to set the limit screws on your rear
    deraileur to prevent selecting the gear that isn't there. This will be
    a hassle because it will mean either that you have to reset your
    deraileur every time you change between your road and off-road
    wheelsets, or else that you permanently lock out your topmost gear.

    Alternatively, a new 9 speed cassette would cost about £25 (Shimano
    HG50); this would make your two wheelsets interchangeable without
    problem.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; All in all you're just another hick in the mall
    -- Drink C'lloid
     
  3. Chris Davies

    Chris Davies Guest

    On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 22:05:06 GMT, Simon Brooke <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > in message <[email protected]>, blackbat
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >> The guy in the shop said the cyclone had nine sprockets but the wheels
    >> he might sell me have eight. He said it's not a prob as they are the
    >> same size cassette - does this sound right?

    >
    > Yes. I have an eight speed shifter on my Mantra but a nine speed
    > cassette. This of course means I can't select my highest gear but as
    > it's mostly a messing about bike anyway it's not too much of a problem.
    > If you put an eight speed cassette onto a bike that's set up for a nine
    > speed one then you will have to set the limit screws on your rear
    > deraileur to prevent selecting the gear that isn't there. This will be
    > a hassle because it will mean either that you have to reset your
    > deraileur every time you change between your road and off-road
    > wheelsets, or else that you permanently lock out your topmost gear.
    >
    > Alternatively, a new 9 speed cassette would cost about £25 (Shimano
    > HG50); this would make your two wheelsets interchangeable without
    > problem.
    >


    One thing to worry about, though, might be that casettes and chains are
    really meant to wear out as a unit. Swapping wheels without also swapping
    the chain might lead to problems with slipping gears.
    The Maxxis Xenith is a great tyre for tarmac, but pretty awful on gravel
    and mud (I have owned a Cyclone, and can tell you this from bitter
    experience). At the price of speed, you might find just running one set of
    wheels with gnarlies is a good idea.

    The wheelset the guy in the shop is offering you sounds excellent.
    Personally I would run it with gnarlies. They are not as fast (or IMO good
    looking) as slicks, but still perfectly rideable, but when you're
    offroading, you will find them much better. Or buy the wheels, a set of
    gnarlies, and slicks. Swapping tyres is nearly as quick as changing a
    wheel if you practise.


    --
    |C|H|R|I|S|@|T|R|I|N|I|T|Y|W|I|L|L|S|.|C|O|M|
    Remove the bars to contact me
     
  4. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Chris Davies wrote:


    > One thing to worry about, though, might be that casettes and chains are
    > really meant to wear out as a unit.


    eh? Using a badly worn chain will rapidly wear out a new cassette, but
    it wouldn't take much preventative maintenance to ... erm, prevent that
    problem arising.

    James
    --
    If I have seen further than others, it is
    by treading on the toes of giants.
    http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
     
  5. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "Chris Davies" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]
    > On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 22:05:06 GMT, Simon Brooke <[email protected]>
    > wrote:


    > One thing to worry about, though, might be that casettes and chains are
    > really meant to wear out as a unit. Swapping wheels without also swapping
    > the chain might lead to problems with slipping gears.


    Sorry but that's twaddle. Changing a chain when it's reached an acceptable
    wear limit will allow you to keep your cassette with a new chain.
     
  6. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Andy
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    >
    > "Chris Davies" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:eek:[email protected]
    >> On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 22:05:06 GMT, Simon Brooke <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:

    >
    >> One thing to worry about, though, might be that casettes and chains
    >> are really meant to wear out as a unit. Swapping wheels without also
    >> swapping the chain might lead to problems with slipping gears.

    >
    > Sorry but that's twaddle. Changing a chain when it's reached an
    > acceptable wear limit will allow you to keep your cassette with a new
    > chain.


    Attributions, please. I didn't write any of that, and I agree with you
    its twaddle.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; Usenet: like distance learning without the learning.
     
  7. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > in message <[email protected]>, Andy
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Chris Davies" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:eek:[email protected]
    >>> On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 22:05:06 GMT, Simon Brooke <[email protected]>
    >>> wrote:

    >>
    >>> One thing to worry about, though, might be that casettes and chains
    >>> are really meant to wear out as a unit. Swapping wheels without also
    >>> swapping the chain might lead to problems with slipping gears.

    >>
    >> Sorry but that's twaddle. Changing a chain when it's reached an
    >> acceptable wear limit will allow you to keep your cassette with a new
    >> chain.

    >
    > Attributions, please. I didn't write any of that, and I agree with you
    > its twaddle.
    >
    > --
    > [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    >
    > ;; Usenet: like distance learning without the learning.


    Sorry, missed out a line when trimming original :)
     
  8. Chris Davies <[email protected]> writes:

    > On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 22:05:06 GMT, Simon Brooke <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > in message <[email protected]>, blackbat
    > > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    > >
    > >> The guy in the shop said the cyclone had nine sprockets but the wheels
    > >> he might sell me have eight. He said it's not a prob as they are the
    > >> same size cassette - does this sound right?

    > >
    > > Yes. I have an eight speed shifter on my Mantra but a nine speed
    > > cassette. This of course means I can't select my highest gear but as
    > > it's mostly a messing about bike anyway it's not too much of a problem.
    > > If you put an eight speed cassette onto a bike that's set up for a nine
    > > speed one then you will have to set the limit screws on your rear
    > > deraileur to prevent selecting the gear that isn't there. This will be
    > > a hassle because it will mean either that you have to reset your
    > > deraileur every time you change between your road and off-road
    > > wheelsets, or else that you permanently lock out your topmost gear.
    > >
    > > Alternatively, a new 9 speed cassette would cost about £25 (Shimano
    > > HG50); this would make your two wheelsets interchangeable without
    > > problem.
    > >

    >
    > One thing to worry about, though, might be that casettes and chains
    > are really meant to wear out as a unit. Swapping wheels without also
    > swapping the chain might lead to problems with slipping gears.
    > The Maxxis Xenith is a great tyre for tarmac, but pretty awful on
    > gravel and mud (I have owned a Cyclone, and can tell you this from
    > bitter experience). At the price of speed, you might find just running
    > one set of wheels with gnarlies is a good idea.


    The Maxxis Xenith is by no stretch of the imagination a great tyre. It
    has higher rolling resistance than the knobblies on my mountain bike,
    yet is still very prone to picking up punctures.

    A
     
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