Re: Bad bicycle reporting on Channel 5 in Kansas City

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Jym Dyer, Feb 20, 2005.

  1. Jym Dyer

    Jym Dyer Guest

    > ... it is both polite and legally required to single up when
    > a car approaches to pass.


    =v= That's a statement that needs qualifiers. There are times
    when bicyclists should take the lane, and "around a curve" is
    pretty much a classic example of that. To "single up" in such
    a situation sends out a dangerous message. It is not impolite.

    =v= There is widespread expectation that if a motorist in front
    of you slows down, there could well be a valid reason, even if
    you can't tell what it is from your perspective. Bicyclists
    should be given the same consideration, and not an iota less.
    <_Jym_>
     
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  2. jj

    jj Guest

    On 20 Feb 2005 06:02:31 -0800, Jym Dyer <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> ... it is both polite and legally required to single up when
    >> a car approaches to pass.

    >
    >=v= That's a statement that needs qualifiers. There are times
    >when bicyclists should take the lane, and "around a curve" is
    >pretty much a classic example of that. To "single up" in such
    >a situation sends out a dangerous message. It is not impolite.
    >
    >=v= There is widespread expectation that if a motorist in front
    >of you slows down, there could well be a valid reason, even if
    >you can't tell what it is from your perspective. Bicyclists
    >should be given the same consideration, and not an iota less.
    > <_Jym_>


    The perception of the cops is important as well. Too often they seem to
    consider bikes as 'being in the way' or not belonging on the road as their
    first reaction and then, if at all they seem to dimly recall 'oh, yeah,
    bikes are 'vehicles' too'. But when it comes to applying the law there
    seems to be a 'nod' to the drivers - like 'dumbass bikers should have known
    not to go there, or do that', and they get some kind of pay-off from
    blaming the biker - a sort of 'blame the victim' mentality.

    As a driver, I sort of understand this - too often we see pedestrians in
    the same light - with a 'get the hell off my street' mentality. I mentioned
    previously how last week a driver started gesticulating and honking at me
    when I was limping across the street in a cross-walk right in front of the
    court-house and he noticeably exaggeratedly swerved to go around me. OK the
    'don't walk light' was on, but turned after I started across and he was too
    far away to see what that light said.

    Driver anxiety goes way up when they are stopped or sitting still in
    traffic, and dramatically decreases when they start moving again. Try it,
    noticing how there's an impulse to 'get moving' especially if you have
    somewhere to go or are in a hurry.

    So perhaps we have this free-floating anxiety and when it's a biker we
    attach it to them as though they're purposely -causing- us to be delayed,
    to slow or stop, when intellectually we know they're not intentionally
    doing anything to us specifically.

    jj
     
  3. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Sun, 20 Feb 2005 10:41:55 -0500,
    <[email protected]>,
    jj <[email protected]> wrote, in part:

    >
    >Driver anxiety goes way up when they are stopped or sitting still in
    >traffic, and dramatically decreases when they start moving again. Try it,
    >noticing how there's an impulse to 'get moving' especially if you have
    >somewhere to go or are in a hurry.


    Like our tolerance for noise, I believe it's also linked to the
    perception of the activity's economic importance. Somebody on a
    bicycle is "playing" in the street. A truck-load of spilled lumber is
    "serious business".
    The truck can cause them hours of delay but they can understand it.
    They find it much harder to accept cyclists rights as legitimate road
    users when the activity is seen as sport or recreation.
    --
    zk
     
  4. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "Zoot Katz" wrote: (clip) when the activity is seen as sport or recreation.
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    I think you have identified a real problem. And it occurs on a subconscious
    level, so the person can feel resentment, even approaching "road rage,"
    without even knowing that it is based on bias. I can cite from my own
    experience: I often drive by a major horserace track. The traffic
    conjestion in that area can be horrible, and I find myself feeling
    resentment toward "those people," because I feel that I am being hindered in
    my "legitimate" travel by their indulgence is a slightly "unsavory" pastime.
     
  5. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Jym Dyer wrote:

    > =v= There is widespread expectation that if a motorist in front
    > of you slows down, there could well be a valid reason, even if
    > you can't tell what it is from your perspective. Bicyclists
    > should be given the same consideration, and not an iota less.
    > <_Jym_>


    Agreed. The flip side though is that, except for the special
    considerations the law grants, we shouldn't be given *more*
    consideration either. Too often in this NG guilt and innocence is
    ascribed solely on the basis of whether the act is performed by a
    cyclist or a driver. For instance, many here seem to believe that a
    cyclist "filtering" through motor vehicle traffic stopped at a red
    light is not passing illegally though in fact, in Illinois anyway, they
    are. Let that filtering cyclist get doored and there are more than a
    few in this group that will call for a public hanging. ;-)

    Regards,
    Bob Hunt
     
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