Re: Cornstarch substitute?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Sheldon, Mar 29, 2005.

  1. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Sheldon volleyed:

    >>> Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL

    >>
    >> And you are? I'm not, but my mother and aunts and uncles were, and
    >> they all cooked Chinese meals at home. I learned some from them and
    >> some from a wide variety of Chinese cookbooks. None of them would
    >> agree with what you posted about eggs. -aem

    >
    > So you claim to have learned from relatives, and cookbooks with no
    > name, so your citations are better than mine? NOT Your replying after
    > the fact with pure garbage can't trump me... if you really knew the
    > answer to the OP's problem you had more than enough time and
    > opportunity to reply with your what you think is your superiour wisdom
    > prior to my response... you're a day late and a nickle short.


    Please, Sheldon, regale us with tales of your Chinese heritage and your
    lengthy apprenticeship under an unremittingly traditional chef in a
    professional kitchen in China. Or please provide some authoritative
    source -- not some bullshit web site; we all know that web sites can be
    found to support all kinds of idiocy -- which backs up your statements.

    Don't have any?

    Then STFU.

    Bob
    P.S.: Your spell-checker isn't working, and your native spelling
    deficiencies are showing.
     


  2. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Sheldon volleyed:

    >>> Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL

    >>
    >> And you are? I'm not, but my mother and aunts and uncles were, and
    >> they all cooked Chinese meals at home. I learned some from them and
    >> some from a wide variety of Chinese cookbooks. None of them would
    >> agree with what you posted about eggs. -aem

    >
    > So you claim to have learned from relatives, and cookbooks with no
    > name, so your citations are better than mine? NOT Your replying after
    > the fact with pure garbage can't trump me... if you really knew the
    > answer to the OP's problem you had more than enough time and
    > opportunity to reply with your what you think is your superiour wisdom
    > prior to my response... you're a day late and a nickle short.


    Please, Sheldon, regale us with tales of your Chinese heritage and your
    lengthy apprenticeship under an unremittingly traditional chef in a
    professional kitchen in China. Or please provide some authoritative
    source -- not some bullshit web site; we all know that web sites can be
    found to support all kinds of idiocy -- which backs up your statements.

    Don't have any?

    Then STFU.

    Bob
    P.S.: Your spell-checker isn't working, and your native spelling
    deficiencies are showing.
     
  3. Bob wrote:
    > Sheldon volleyed:
    >
    >
    >>>>Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL
    >>>
    >>>And you are? I'm not, but my mother and aunts and uncles were, and
    >>>they all cooked Chinese meals at home. I learned some from them and
    >>>some from a wide variety of Chinese cookbooks. None of them would
    >>>agree with what you posted about eggs. -aem

    >>
    >>So you claim to have learned from relatives, and cookbooks with no
    >>name, so your citations are better than mine? NOT Your replying after
    >>the fact with pure garbage can't trump me... if you really knew the
    >>answer to the OP's problem you had more than enough time and
    >>opportunity to reply with your what you think is your superiour wisdom
    >>prior to my response... you're a day late and a nickle short.

    >
    >
    > Please, Sheldon, regale us with tales of your Chinese heritage and your
    > lengthy apprenticeship under an unremittingly traditional chef in a
    > professional kitchen in China. Or please provide some authoritative
    > source -- not some bullshit web site; we all know that web sites can be
    > found to support all kinds of idiocy -- which backs up your statements.
    >
    > Don't have any?
    >
    > Then STFU.
    >
    > Bob
    > P.S.: Your spell-checker isn't working, and your native spelling
    > deficiencies are showing.


    Apparently the content and IQ checkers are equally dead.

    Pastorio
     
  4. Bob wrote:
    > Sheldon volleyed:
    >
    >
    >>>>Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL
    >>>
    >>>And you are? I'm not, but my mother and aunts and uncles were, and
    >>>they all cooked Chinese meals at home. I learned some from them and
    >>>some from a wide variety of Chinese cookbooks. None of them would
    >>>agree with what you posted about eggs. -aem

    >>
    >>So you claim to have learned from relatives, and cookbooks with no
    >>name, so your citations are better than mine? NOT Your replying after
    >>the fact with pure garbage can't trump me... if you really knew the
    >>answer to the OP's problem you had more than enough time and
    >>opportunity to reply with your what you think is your superiour wisdom
    >>prior to my response... you're a day late and a nickle short.

    >
    >
    > Please, Sheldon, regale us with tales of your Chinese heritage and your
    > lengthy apprenticeship under an unremittingly traditional chef in a
    > professional kitchen in China. Or please provide some authoritative
    > source -- not some bullshit web site; we all know that web sites can be
    > found to support all kinds of idiocy -- which backs up your statements.
    >
    > Don't have any?
    >
    > Then STFU.
    >
    > Bob
    > P.S.: Your spell-checker isn't working, and your native spelling
    > deficiencies are showing.


    Apparently the content and IQ checkers are equally dead.

    Pastorio
     
  5. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    "Ariane Jenkins" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 29 Mar 2005 19:13:00 -0800, Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > aem wrote:
    > >> Sheldon wrote:
    > >> [snip preceding]
    > >> >
    > >> > You're not making fried rice. In fried rice the whole egg is first
    > >> > fried like an omelet and then used in bits as a garnish, raw egg is
    > >> > not blended into anything... in fact in Chinese fried rice only the
    > >> > yolk is fried

    > > Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL
    > >

    >
    > But I am. And this is the first I've heard of using only the yolk in
    > fried rice. Most people I know use the whole egg in fried rice, hot and

    sour
    > soup, etc. including myself. And it can be stir-fried separately from the
    > rice OR stir-fried with it, it varies according to who's making it. An

    aunt
    > of mine does it the omelet way--cooking it into a thin pancake and then
    > cooling it before julienning it for a garnish. Other aunts of mine simply
    > scramble it with the rice so that it forms small chunks mixed in with
    > everything else. Less elegant, perhaps, but it's faster and it tastes

    just as
    > good.
    >
    > Then again, you're also the same person who claimed few procedures

    in
    > Asian cuisine takes longer than 3 minutes and that wasn't true, either.
    >
    > Ariane
    > --
    > Dysfunction: The only consistent feature of all your dissatisfying
    > relationships is you.
    > http://www.despair.com/demotivators/dysfunction.html
    >

    Thanks, Ariane. I don't know that my recipe is "authentic", just that
    mother was given it in Thailand and I've been enjoying it for over 30 years
    and making it myself for over 20. I definitely use whole egg in fried rice
    and in these dumplings.

    Jill
     
  6. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    "Ariane Jenkins" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 29 Mar 2005 19:13:00 -0800, Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > aem wrote:
    > >> Sheldon wrote:
    > >> [snip preceding]
    > >> >
    > >> > You're not making fried rice. In fried rice the whole egg is first
    > >> > fried like an omelet and then used in bits as a garnish, raw egg is
    > >> > not blended into anything... in fact in Chinese fried rice only the
    > >> > yolk is fried

    > > Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL
    > >

    >
    > But I am. And this is the first I've heard of using only the yolk in
    > fried rice. Most people I know use the whole egg in fried rice, hot and

    sour
    > soup, etc. including myself. And it can be stir-fried separately from the
    > rice OR stir-fried with it, it varies according to who's making it. An

    aunt
    > of mine does it the omelet way--cooking it into a thin pancake and then
    > cooling it before julienning it for a garnish. Other aunts of mine simply
    > scramble it with the rice so that it forms small chunks mixed in with
    > everything else. Less elegant, perhaps, but it's faster and it tastes

    just as
    > good.
    >
    > Then again, you're also the same person who claimed few procedures

    in
    > Asian cuisine takes longer than 3 minutes and that wasn't true, either.
    >
    > Ariane
    > --
    > Dysfunction: The only consistent feature of all your dissatisfying
    > relationships is you.
    > http://www.despair.com/demotivators/dysfunction.html
    >

    Thanks, Ariane. I don't know that my recipe is "authentic", just that
    mother was given it in Thailand and I've been enjoying it for over 30 years
    and making it myself for over 20. I definitely use whole egg in fried rice
    and in these dumplings.

    Jill
     
  7. aem

    aem Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    > aem wrote:
    > > Sheldon wrote:
    > > >
    > > > Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL

    > >
    > > And you are? I'm not, but my mother and aunts and uncles were, and
    > > they all cooked Chinese meals at home. I learned some from them
    > > and some from a wide variety of Chinese cookbooks. None of them
    > > would agree with what you posted about eggs. -aem

    >
    > So you claim to have learned from relatives, and cookbooks with no
    > name, so your citations are better than mine? NOT


    I didn't make any citations, just corrected your false statement about
    my ancestry. Why you think it's relevant is beyond me.

    > Your replying after
    > the fact with pure garbage can't trump me... if you really knew the
    > answer to the OP's problem you had more than enough time and
    > opportunity to reply with your what you think is your superiour
    > wisdom prior to my response... you're a day late and a nickle short.


    Actually, I replied the same day to the original post with a suggestion
    which, as it happens, she followed with a good result.
    >
    > Eggs are probably the most revered ingredient in Chinese cusine, eggs
    > play a very important part in all aspects of Chinese culture. The
    > Chinese are extremely particular in all the various machinations
    > pertaining to egg usage in their cusine and they do in fact pay very
    > careful attention to the proportion of white and yolk used.


    The Rule of Holes might help you out: When you're in over your head,
    stop digging. -aem
     
  8. aem

    aem Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    > aem wrote:
    > > Sheldon wrote:
    > > >
    > > > Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL

    > >
    > > And you are? I'm not, but my mother and aunts and uncles were, and
    > > they all cooked Chinese meals at home. I learned some from them
    > > and some from a wide variety of Chinese cookbooks. None of them
    > > would agree with what you posted about eggs. -aem

    >
    > So you claim to have learned from relatives, and cookbooks with no
    > name, so your citations are better than mine? NOT


    I didn't make any citations, just corrected your false statement about
    my ancestry. Why you think it's relevant is beyond me.

    > Your replying after
    > the fact with pure garbage can't trump me... if you really knew the
    > answer to the OP's problem you had more than enough time and
    > opportunity to reply with your what you think is your superiour
    > wisdom prior to my response... you're a day late and a nickle short.


    Actually, I replied the same day to the original post with a suggestion
    which, as it happens, she followed with a good result.
    >
    > Eggs are probably the most revered ingredient in Chinese cusine, eggs
    > play a very important part in all aspects of Chinese culture. The
    > Chinese are extremely particular in all the various machinations
    > pertaining to egg usage in their cusine and they do in fact pay very
    > careful attention to the proportion of white and yolk used.


    The Rule of Holes might help you out: When you're in over your head,
    stop digging. -aem
     
  9. Rusty

    Rusty Guest

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 14:14:21 -0600, "jmcquown"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >


    >>

    >I used just a couple of pinches of flour and mixed it all up. The filling
    >turned out fine. However, by the time I got around to doing that, I wound
    >up just covering it tightly in a bowl. I'll fill and steam the dumplings
    >today. I also thought I'd take about 1/2 of the mixture and add some
    >chopped water chestnuts for something a little different with a bit of
    >crunch.
    >
    >Jill
    >


    Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?

    The Kingsford's comes in a box with a plastic inner liner. After
    scooping out several tablespoons of cornstarch, the liner has bumped
    the measuring spoon and flipped cornstarch everywhere.

    I've tried the Betty Crocker cornstarch that comes in a cylinder. The
    plastic top rotates open and closed. Of course the slot that opens is
    too narrow to get the measuring spoon into. When trying to shake the
    cornstarch into the measuring spoon it either cakes up and won't come
    out of the container or big globs come out and go everywhere.

    Does anyone make a workable container that allows you to use
    cornstarch without spreading it everywhere?


    Rusty
     
  10. Rusty

    Rusty Guest

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 14:14:21 -0600, "jmcquown"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >


    >>

    >I used just a couple of pinches of flour and mixed it all up. The filling
    >turned out fine. However, by the time I got around to doing that, I wound
    >up just covering it tightly in a bowl. I'll fill and steam the dumplings
    >today. I also thought I'd take about 1/2 of the mixture and add some
    >chopped water chestnuts for something a little different with a bit of
    >crunch.
    >
    >Jill
    >


    Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?

    The Kingsford's comes in a box with a plastic inner liner. After
    scooping out several tablespoons of cornstarch, the liner has bumped
    the measuring spoon and flipped cornstarch everywhere.

    I've tried the Betty Crocker cornstarch that comes in a cylinder. The
    plastic top rotates open and closed. Of course the slot that opens is
    too narrow to get the measuring spoon into. When trying to shake the
    cornstarch into the measuring spoon it either cakes up and won't come
    out of the container or big globs come out and go everywhere.

    Does anyone make a workable container that allows you to use
    cornstarch without spreading it everywhere?


    Rusty
     
  11. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Rusty wrote:
    >
    > Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?
    >
    > The Kingsford's comes in a box with a plastic inner liner. After
    > scooping out several tablespoons of cornstarch, the liner has bumped
    > the measuring spoon and flipped cornstarch everywhere.
    >
    > I've tried the Betty Crocker cornstarch that comes in a cylinder. The
    > plastic top rotates open and closed. Of course the slot that opens is
    > too narrow to get the measuring spoon into. When trying to shake the
    > cornstarch into the measuring spoon it either cakes up and won't come
    > out of the container or big globs come out and go everywhere.
    >
    > Does anyone make a workable container that allows you to use
    > cornstarch without spreading it everywhere?


    Dump your corn starch into a different container... a jelly jar works
    for me.

    Btw, those shaker holes are for powdering a babie's b-hind.

    Sheldon
     
  12. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Rusty wrote:
    >
    > Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?
    >
    > The Kingsford's comes in a box with a plastic inner liner. After
    > scooping out several tablespoons of cornstarch, the liner has bumped
    > the measuring spoon and flipped cornstarch everywhere.
    >
    > I've tried the Betty Crocker cornstarch that comes in a cylinder. The
    > plastic top rotates open and closed. Of course the slot that opens is
    > too narrow to get the measuring spoon into. When trying to shake the
    > cornstarch into the measuring spoon it either cakes up and won't come
    > out of the container or big globs come out and go everywhere.
    >
    > Does anyone make a workable container that allows you to use
    > cornstarch without spreading it everywhere?


    Dump your corn starch into a different container... a jelly jar works
    for me.

    Btw, those shaker holes are for powdering a babie's b-hind.

    Sheldon
     
  13. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Rusty wrote:
    >
    > On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 14:14:21 -0600, "jmcquown"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >

    >
    > >>

    > >I used just a couple of pinches of flour and mixed it all up. The filling
    > >turned out fine. However, by the time I got around to doing that, I wound
    > >up just covering it tightly in a bowl. I'll fill and steam the dumplings
    > >today. I also thought I'd take about 1/2 of the mixture and add some
    > >chopped water chestnuts for something a little different with a bit of
    > >crunch.
    > >
    > >Jill
    > >

    >
    > Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?



    LOL not especially. We remove it from the box and put it into a clean
    wide-mouth screwtop jar. Easy to measure out and easy to clean for the
    next box.




    >
    > The Kingsford's comes in a box with a plastic inner liner. After
    > scooping out several tablespoons of cornstarch, the liner has bumped
    > the measuring spoon and flipped cornstarch everywhere.
    >
    > I've tried the Betty Crocker cornstarch that comes in a cylinder. The
    > plastic top rotates open and closed. Of course the slot that opens is
    > too narrow to get the measuring spoon into. When trying to shake the
    > cornstarch into the measuring spoon it either cakes up and won't come
    > out of the container or big globs come out and go everywhere.
    >
    > Does anyone make a workable container that allows you to use
    > cornstarch without spreading it everywhere?
    >
    > Rusty
     
  14. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Rusty wrote:
    >
    > On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 14:14:21 -0600, "jmcquown"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >

    >
    > >>

    > >I used just a couple of pinches of flour and mixed it all up. The filling
    > >turned out fine. However, by the time I got around to doing that, I wound
    > >up just covering it tightly in a bowl. I'll fill and steam the dumplings
    > >today. I also thought I'd take about 1/2 of the mixture and add some
    > >chopped water chestnuts for something a little different with a bit of
    > >crunch.
    > >
    > >Jill
    > >

    >
    > Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?



    LOL not especially. We remove it from the box and put it into a clean
    wide-mouth screwtop jar. Easy to measure out and easy to clean for the
    next box.




    >
    > The Kingsford's comes in a box with a plastic inner liner. After
    > scooping out several tablespoons of cornstarch, the liner has bumped
    > the measuring spoon and flipped cornstarch everywhere.
    >
    > I've tried the Betty Crocker cornstarch that comes in a cylinder. The
    > plastic top rotates open and closed. Of course the slot that opens is
    > too narrow to get the measuring spoon into. When trying to shake the
    > cornstarch into the measuring spoon it either cakes up and won't come
    > out of the container or big globs come out and go everywhere.
    >
    > Does anyone make a workable container that allows you to use
    > cornstarch without spreading it everywhere?
    >
    > Rusty
     
  15. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    "Rusty" <[email protected]_spam_y_a_h_o_o_.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 14:14:21 -0600, "jmcquown"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >

    >
    > >>

    > >I used just a couple of pinches of flour and mixed it all up.> >Jill
    > >

    >
    > Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?
    >

    Not particularly. I use that stuff in the yellow box wth a woman dressed
    like she's a corn cob on the box.
    (snippage)
    > Rusty


    Here's my finished first batch of Thai dumplings. Absolutely delicious.

    http://community.webshots.com/photo/74365720/309920234pghZGS

    Tomorrow I'll chop the remaining water chestnuts and add them to the
    remaining mixture before steaming.

    Jill
     
  16. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    "Rusty" <[email protected]_spam_y_a_h_o_o_.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 14:14:21 -0600, "jmcquown"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >

    >
    > >>

    > >I used just a couple of pinches of flour and mixed it all up.> >Jill
    > >

    >
    > Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?
    >

    Not particularly. I use that stuff in the yellow box wth a woman dressed
    like she's a corn cob on the box.
    (snippage)
    > Rusty


    Here's my finished first batch of Thai dumplings. Absolutely delicious.

    http://community.webshots.com/photo/74365720/309920234pghZGS

    Tomorrow I'll chop the remaining water chestnuts and add them to the
    remaining mixture before steaming.

    Jill
     
  17. Rusty

    Rusty Guest

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 17:45:28 -0700, Arri London <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >>
    >> Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?

    >
    >
    >LOL not especially. We remove it from the box and put it into a clean
    >wide-mouth screwtop jar. Easy to measure out and easy to clean for the
    >next box.
    >
    >
    >


    That's my gripe.

    So why don't the cornstarch vendors package it in wide- mouth screwtop
    jars to beging with? Most food products (I didn't say "all") are used
    from the container they are sold in. If you have to move it to a
    different container to use it, then I don't believe it's packaged
    correctly.


    Rusty
     
  18. Rusty

    Rusty Guest

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 17:45:28 -0700, Arri London <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >>
    >> Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?

    >
    >
    >LOL not especially. We remove it from the box and put it into a clean
    >wide-mouth screwtop jar. Easy to measure out and easy to clean for the
    >next box.
    >
    >
    >


    That's my gripe.

    So why don't the cornstarch vendors package it in wide- mouth screwtop
    jars to beging with? Most food products (I didn't say "all") are used
    from the container they are sold in. If you have to move it to a
    different container to use it, then I don't believe it's packaged
    correctly.


    Rusty
     
  19. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Jill wrote:

    > Here's my finished first batch of Thai dumplings. Absolutely delicious.
    >
    > http://community.webshots.com/photo/74365720/309920234pghZGS


    (Jill, I profusely apologize for what I'm about to write.)

    One of the offices at work has a TV going nonstop. In theory, it's so that
    the military folks there can keep an eye on the news of the world, and react
    to notify senior officials if anything potentially threatening happens. In
    practice, the guys on duty watch whatever they want to watch, and when I
    came into their office last week, they were watching a rerun of a Fear
    Factor Christmas episode. The contestants were told to eat raw reindeer
    testicles, and those testicles bore a VERY strong resemblance to that photo
    of your Thai dumplings!

    Bob
     
  20. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Jill wrote:

    > Here's my finished first batch of Thai dumplings. Absolutely delicious.
    >
    > http://community.webshots.com/photo/74365720/309920234pghZGS


    (Jill, I profusely apologize for what I'm about to write.)

    One of the offices at work has a TV going nonstop. In theory, it's so that
    the military folks there can keep an eye on the news of the world, and react
    to notify senior officials if anything potentially threatening happens. In
    practice, the guys on duty watch whatever they want to watch, and when I
    came into their office last week, they were watching a rerun of a Fear
    Factor Christmas episode. The contestants were told to eat raw reindeer
    testicles, and those testicles bore a VERY strong resemblance to that photo
    of your Thai dumplings!

    Bob
     
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