Re: Cornstarch substitute?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Sheldon, Mar 29, 2005.

  1. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Rusty wrote:

    >
    > Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?


    Argh!!! Cornstarch is the worst.
     


  2. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Rusty wrote:

    >
    > Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?


    Argh!!! Cornstarch is the worst.
     
  3. On 30 Mar 2005 13:55:44 -0800, Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > So you claim to have learned from relatives, and cookbooks with no
    > name, so your citations are better than mine? NOT Your replying after
    > the fact with pure garbage can't trump me... if you really knew the
    > answer to the OP's problem you had more than enough time and
    > opportunity to reply with your what you think is your superiour wisdom
    > prior to my response... you're a day late and a nickle short.
    >
    > Eggs are probably the most revered ingredient in Chinese cusine, eggs
    > play a very important part in all aspects of Chinese culture. The
    > Chinese are extremely particular in all the various machinations
    > pertaining to egg usage in their cusine and they do in fact pay very
    > careful attention to the proportion of white and yolk used.
    >


    Citation? You asserted that Chinese people only use yolk in fried
    rice. Perhaps I missed your "citation", but so far two people of Chinese
    ancestry and lots of Chinese relatives have piped up to say that none of
    their family does it that way and it's certainly not an exclusive practice.
    Your case doesn't look good, and you're not really helping yourself any with
    posts like the above.

    I also don't know where you get that idea about eggs being "the most
    revered ingedient in Chinese cuisine". I'm guessing you got it from the same
    place as "only yolk is used in fried rice" and "few procedures in Asian
    cuisine take longer than 3 minutes". With a track record like that, people
    would do well to take your helpful advice about Chinese cooking with a huge
    grain of MSG.

    Ariane
    --
    Stupidity: Quitters never win, winners never quit, but those who never win
    and never quit are idiots.
    http://www.despair.com/stup24x30pri.html
     
  4. On 30 Mar 2005 11:26:41 -0800, aem <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Tastes better, I think. I push the rice away from the bottom of the
    > wok and break the egg(s) in there, season with s&p and a few drops of
    > sesame oil, scramble it in place until set but still soft, then stir it
    > into the rice. Doing it the 'garnish omelet' way almost always gets
    > you overly cooked, dry results. -aem


    Yeah, the egg ends up being drier. Some people prefer the
    texture better that way, I could go either way. But if it's just us,
    I don't go through the extra trouble. We rarely make fried rice at home in
    any case, I'm not that crazy about it.

    Ariane
    --
    Dysfunction: The only consistent feature of all your dissatisfying
    relationships is you.
    http://www.despair.com/demotivators/dysfunction.html
     
  5. Dave Smith <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >Rusty wrote:
    >
    >> Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?

    >
    >Argh!!! Cornstarch is the worst.


    It's a pain in the butt, trying to work around that inner bag. But! It
    makes cool sounds when you squeeze the box. Back in the days of radio,
    when they needed the sound of someone walking through snow, they squeezed
    the box once for each footstep. Try it .. .it's fun!

    Carol
    --
    Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
     
  6. Dave Smith <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >Rusty wrote:
    >
    >> Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?

    >
    >Argh!!! Cornstarch is the worst.


    Oh, I just thought of this. You can get Tone's cornstarch, in a large
    plastic container, at Sam's (and probably Coscto). I have a container
    somewhere. Still haven't finished unpacking.

    Carol
    --
    Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
     
  7. Ariane Jenkins <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >With a track record like that, people would do well to take your
    >helpful advice about Chinese cooking with a huge grain of MSG.


    ROFLMAO!

    Carol
    --
    Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
     
  8. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Ariane wrote:

    > I also don't know where you get that idea about eggs being "the most
    > revered ingedient in Chinese cuisine". I'm guessing you got it from the
    > same place as "only yolk is used in fried rice" and "few procedures in
    > Asian cuisine take longer than 3 minutes".



    Same place he gets most of the misbegotten bizarrerie he posts as if they
    were facts: His ass.

    (Hey, here's a question: Since when is there a unified "Asian" cuisine?)

    Bob
     
  9. On 31 Mar 2005 00:21:03 -0600, Bob <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote:
    > Ariane wrote:
    >
    >> I also don't know where you get that idea about eggs being "the most
    >> revered ingedient in Chinese cuisine". I'm guessing you got it from the
    >> same place as "only yolk is used in fried rice" and "few procedures in
    >> Asian cuisine take longer than 3 minutes".

    >
    >
    > Same place he gets most of the misbegotten bizarrerie he posts as if they
    > were facts: His ass.


    That would seem to be the case... ;D

    > (Hey, here's a question: Since when is there a unified "Asian" cuisine?)


    LOL, there isn't, of course. But I don't know of any single Asian
    cuisine where Sheldon's claim applies, and it certainly doesn't apply to Asian
    cuisines in general. But perhaps we should consider the source, as mentioned
    above. <g>

    Ariane
    --
    Dysfunction: The only consistent feature of all your dissatisfying
    relationships is you.
    http://www.despair.com/demotivators/dysfunction.html
     
  10. One time on Usenet, "jmcquown" <[email protected]> said:
    > "Ariane Jenkins" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > On 29 Mar 2005 19:13:00 -0800, Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > aem wrote:
    > > >> Sheldon wrote:
    > > >> [snip preceding]
    > > >> >
    > > >> > You're not making fried rice. In fried rice the whole egg is first
    > > >> > fried like an omelet and then used in bits as a garnish, raw egg is
    > > >> > not blended into anything... in fact in Chinese fried rice only the
    > > >> > yolk is fried


    > > > Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL


    > > But I am. And this is the first I've heard of using only the yolk in
    > > fried rice. Most people I know use the whole egg in fried rice, hot and
    > > sour soup, etc. including myself. And it can be stir-fried separately from
    > > the rice OR stir-fried with it, it varies according to who's making
    > > it. An aunt
    > > of mine does it the omelet way--cooking it into a thin pancake and then
    > > cooling it before julienning it for a garnish. Other aunts of mine simply
    > > scramble it with the rice so that it forms small chunks mixed in with
    > > everything else. Less elegant, perhaps, but it's faster and it tastes
    > > just as good.


    <snip>

    > Thanks, Ariane. I don't know that my recipe is "authentic", just that
    > mother was given it in Thailand and I've been enjoying it for over 30 years
    > and making it myself for over 20. I definitely use whole egg in fried rice
    > and in these dumplings.


    I also use whole eggs in fried rice -- once the rice is ready, I push
    it over and make a spot to quickly cook and cut the scrambled egg. Then
    I mix the chunks of egg back into the rice. It looks like the stuff I
    get at Chinese restaurants, so I must be doing something right... :)

    --
    J.J. in WA ~ mom, vid gamer, novice cook ~
    "You still haven't explained why the pool is
    filled with elf blood." - Frylock, ATHF
     
  11. aem

    aem Guest

    Rusty wrote:
    > So why don't the cornstarch vendors package it in wide- mouth
    > screwtop jars to beging with? Most food products (I didn't say
    > "all") are used from the container they are sold in. If you have
    > to move it to a different container to use it, then I don't
    > believe it's packaged correctly.


    Sorry 'bout that, but it's probably because most people don't spray
    cornstarch all over the kitchen. Therefore, Kingsford et al. don't get
    a lot of complaints about their packaging. I'm not saying you're
    clumsy <g> but it appears that you don't pay quite enough attention....
    -aem
     
  12. Rusty

    Rusty Guest

    On 31 Mar 2005 16:15:06 -0800, "aem" <[email protected]> wrote:


    >
    >Sorry 'bout that, but it's probably because most people don't spray
    >cornstarch all over the kitchen. Therefore, Kingsford et al. don't get
    >a lot of complaints about their packaging. I'm not saying you're
    >clumsy <g> but it appears that you don't pay quite enough attention....
    > -aem


    Yea, that's probably why Betty Crocker is offering cornstarch in a
    cardboard cylinder with a shaker top. They just didn't take it a step
    further and make an opening large enough to fit a measuring tablespoon
    into.

    Or why Clabber Girl offers it in a steel can with a plastic snap on
    top with large letters saying, "Easier to use and store. No Mess!".

    http://images.packworld.com/issues/05.04/images/Departments/cornstarch1.jpg

    I must be the only person that ever complained.


    Rusty
     
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