Re: dry run to the markets

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by bob syr, Jun 20, 2008.

  1. bob syr

    bob syr Guest

    > > a used bike for exercise and fun riding.  I like the 3-speed but maybe
    > > I’ll try a 5-speed to get used to the up-to-date bike gears.

    >
    > Up-to-date?
    >

    Hey, that's what the salesman told me as he tried to sell me a 25-gear
    $1,800 special today only.
    You gotta get up to date.
     
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  2. In article
    <[email protected]>,
    bob syr <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > > a used bike for exercise and fun riding.  I like the 3-speed but maybe
    > > > I¹ll try a 5-speed to get used to the up-to-date bike gears.

    > >
    > > Up-to-date?
    > >

    > Hey, that's what the salesman told me as he tried to sell me a 25-gear
    > $1,800 special today only.
    > You gotta get up to date.


    25? I'd like to see photos of that drivetrain.

    More confusingly, bikes priced in the $1800 (new) range tend to be
    nominal 27-speeds (for MTBs) or 20/30 speeds (for double- and
    triple-equipped road bikes).

    My newest drivetrain has 8 speeds,

    --
    Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
    "In other newsgroups, they killfile trolls."
    "In rec.bicycles.racing, we coach them."
     
  3. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    "bob syr" <[email protected]> wrote

    > > a used bike for exercise and fun riding. I like the 3-speed but maybe
    > > I’ll try a 5-speed to get used to the up-to-date bike gears.

    >
    > Up-to-date?
    >

    :Hey, that's what the salesman told me as he tried to sell me a 25-gear
    :$1,800 special today only.
    :You gotta get up to date.

    I don't know if you really need an $1800 25-gear bike or not, but you can
    get some much less expensive 27-speed bikes with much better gear options
    than is likely on a 3 or 5 speed.
     
  4. On Jun 20, 10:28 pm, bob syr <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > a used bike for exercise and fun riding. I like the 3-speed but maybe
    > > > I’ll try a 5-speed to get used to the up-to-date bike gears.

    >
    > > Up-to-date?

    >
    > Hey, that's what the salesman told me as he tried to sell me a 25-gear
    > $1,800 special today only.
    > You gotta get up to date.


    I'm not sure that you need a new bike as much as a new salesman.
    Me, I like having a wide range of gears. But I think I could get a
    nice bike (with low gears for climbing with a load and big gears
    deadheading) by spending a lot less than $1800.

    $1800 seems pretty pricey for a commuter bike - that's the kind of
    dough that them recreational weight weenies spend on their bikes. It
    may be a very good deal, but I suspect that it's something that the
    store would like to get rid of rather than something that other
    customers have been asking for and they are having trouble stocking
    due to high demand.

    Here is a bike sold by REI - who are generally NOT known as a discount
    retailer - It may not be the bike of your dreams but it does seem to
    have a wide range of gears (but still only 8 speeds) and luggage
    carrying capabilities for about half the price you mentioned:
    http://www.rei.com/product/744803?c...-5041-DD11-98CA-001422107090&mr:referralID=NA
    Plus it comes with lights and a dyno-hub to generate juice for the
    lights, a pretty utilitarian setup in my book. If you have an REI
    store near you it might behoove you to look at the plethora of bikes
    there before you plunk down more than a grand.

    Kona doesn't publish a MSR on their web site:
    http://www.konaworld.com/08_ute_w.htm
    But their Ute looks like it could be used to bring home some bacon,
    even though it doesn't really have the big ring for the empty side of
    the trip.

    Google for utility bike and I'm certain you'll find lots of reading
    material.
     
  5. On Jun 24, 11:41 am, DennisTheBald <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Jun 20, 10:28 pm, bob syr <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > > > a used bike for exercise and fun riding.  I like the 3-speed but maybe
    > > > > I’ll try a 5-speed to get used to the up-to-date bike gears.

    >
    > > > Up-to-date?

    >
    > > Hey, that's what the salesman told me as he tried to sell me a 25-gear
    > > $1,800 special today only.
    > > You gotta get up to date.

    >
    > I'm not sure that you need a new bike as much as a new salesman.
    > Me, I like having a wide range of gears. But I think I could get a
    > nice bike (with low gears for climbing with a load and big gears
    > deadheading) by spending a lot less than $1800.
    >
    > $1800 seems pretty pricey for a commuter bike - that's the kind of
    > dough that them recreational weight weenies spend on their bikes.  It
    > may be a very good deal, but I suspect that it's something that the
    > store would like to get rid of rather than something that other
    > customers have been asking for and they are having trouble stocking
    > due to high demand.
    >
    > Here is a bike sold by REI - who are generally NOT known as a discount
    > retailer - It may not be the bike of your dreams but it does seem to
    > have a wide range of gears (but still only 8 speeds) and luggage
    > carrying capabilities for about half the price you mentioned:http://www.rei.com/product/744803?cm_mmc=cse_froogle-_-datafeed-_-pro...
    > Plus it comes with lights and a dyno-hub to generate juice for the
    > lights, a pretty utilitarian setup in my book.  If you have an REI
    > store near you it might behoove you to look at the plethora of bikes
    > there before you plunk down more than a grand.


    Wow, that's pretty cool. If I wasn't so hooked on "drops" and making
    the best time I can on the unloaded side of the trip I'd seriously
    consider one. I just don't see myself being happy on a bike that
    weighs 34lbs, though that is acceptable for what the bike is intended
    as.
     
  6. On Jun 25, 12:27 pm, "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Wow, that's pretty cool. If I wasn't so hooked on "drops" and making
    > the best time I can on the unloaded side of the trip I'd seriously
    > consider one. I just don't see myself being happy on a bike that
    > weighs 34lbs, though that is acceptable for what the bike is intended
    > as.


    Yeah, well this is more of an upgrade path for Bob Syr than for
    you...
    and so we start with name calling - you sound like one of them weight
    weenies that would spend $1800 on a bike that didn't even have
    fenders.

    In Bob's case neither the Novara nor the Kona is the low cost
    provider... grab a mountain bike and add an extra cycle (http://
    www.xtracycle.com/) to it. Use a trailer, even one that was designed
    to haul a toddler... There are a number of options that allow us to
    use our bikes for our regular errands.

    But unless you like going shopping everyday, or every other day, a
    pair of "townie" panniers on the luggage rack that is common to most
    touring setups just won't hold enough to do a weeks worth of grocery
    shopping. You're gonna have to get long, you will want at least two
    of those townies on each side. (four bags of groceries, twice a week -
    yeah, if you don't drink soda pop or beer - three times a week if you
    do). Look at how the people that do all their hauling with a bike
    load theirs up, them Dutch people ride some heavy bikes. If you're
    just commuting you can get by with a regular touring setup or even
    half that, but once you start hauling groceries home you need some
    truckular wheels.
     
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