Re: Finally fixed (me too! thread)

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by sothach, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. sothach

    sothach Guest

    OK, couldn't fit it and me ion the kitchen, but this is quite close:
    http://my.opera.com/Velo-City/homes/albums/49101/fixed2.JPG

    Gotta agree with most of what Bob Downie said about riding fixed for
    the first time, but he should have mentioned stopping: seriously weird
    experiance, like being puched in the soles of your feet. I guess I'll
    get used to it, but I'm glad I didn'f fit toe-clips or spuds yet, cuz
    on a couple of hills it was a case ot just bottling it, and holding my
    feet in the air as the pedals span. I think I'll fit a rear brake.
     
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  2. Bob Downie

    Bob Downie Guest

    In message <[email protected]>,
    sothach <[email protected]> writes
    >OK, couldn't fit it and me ion the kitchen, but this is quite close:
    >http://my.opera.com/Velo-City/homes/albums/49101/fixed2.JPG
    >
    >Gotta agree with most of what Bob Downie said about riding fixed for
    >the first time, but he should have mentioned stopping: seriously weird
    >experiance, like being puched in the soles of your feet. I guess I'll
    >get used to it, but I'm glad I didn'f fit toe-clips or spuds yet, cuz
    >on a couple of hills it was a case ot just bottling it, and holding my
    >feet in the air as the pedals span. I think I'll fit a rear brake.
    >

    Like those bars. What do you call them?

    Sorry, I should have said about the stopping. See Sheldon for seriously
    cool dismounting.

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/fixed.html#mounting

    Cheers and shame about the kitchen
    --
    Bob Downie
    Downie GeoScience Ltd.
    please remove #n0spam# to reply directly
     
  3. sothach

    sothach Guest

    Bob Downie wrote:
    > In message <[email protected]>,
    > sothach <[email protected]> writes
    > >OK, couldn't fit it and me ion the kitchen, but this is quite close:
    > >http://my.opera.com/Velo-City/homes/albums/49101/fixed2.JPG


    I should add some techie info, for anyone thinking of treading this
    path.

    Frame is a NYCBikes in black, costs about 90quid (plus some 30quid of
    shipping costs), most parts were from my cellar (front wheel, saddle,
    brakes, mtb crank,
    got a Suze cheapo hub + 14 tooth sprocket, using the smallest chainring
    (30 tooth),
    giving slightly taller than 2:1 (its hilly round here), weighs in at
    about 9kg,
    which feels like nothing after my steel, rohloff, magura, racks, etc.,
    equipped
    commuter, but the wheels and forks could be swapped at a later date.

    > Like those bars. What do you call them?


    They are supposed to be Nitto moustache-handlebar copies, but the ends
    are straight rather than curved. I think they are just normal
    Dutch-bike bars that I've fitted upside down. Feel good though, and
    nice for mashing up the hills.

    > Sorry, I should have said about the stopping. See Sheldon for seriously
    > cool dismounting.
    >
    > http://www.sheldonbrown.com/fixed.html#mounting


    Can you do that? Sounds wierd, anyone got a training video?

    > Cheers and shame about the kitchen


    It's a fine kitchen, the best that our Ikea did sell.... just not a
    good bike workshop.
     
  4. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>,
    sothach ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > OK, couldn't fit it and me ion the kitchen, but this is quite close:
    > http://my.opera.com/Velo-City/homes/albums/49101/fixed2.JPG


    Very pretty. Very minimalist. The small chainwheel and sprocket will be
    marginally less efficient than bigger ones with the same ratio, but they
    make the bike look very cool.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; Madness takes its toll. Please have exact change.
     
  5. LSMike

    LSMike Guest

    sothach wrote:
    > OK, couldn't fit it and me ion the kitchen, but this is quite close:
    > http://my.opera.com/Velo-City/homes/albums/49101/fixed2.JPG
    >
    > Gotta agree with most of what Bob Downie said about riding fixed for
    > the first time, but he should have mentioned stopping: seriously weird
    > experiance, like being puched in the soles of your feet. I guess I'll
    > get used to it, but I'm glad I didn'f fit toe-clips or spuds yet, cuz
    > on a couple of hills it was a case ot just bottling it, and holding my
    > feet in the air as the pedals span. I think I'll fit a rear brake.


    Ooh, cool looking bike! You must be very chuffed. :)

    I went straight with clipless pedals, that worked well for me.
    Preferred that to letting a foot slip off the pedals and then taking
    one in the calf.
     
  6. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall Guest

    On 28 Mar 2006 00:14:29 -0800, "sothach" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >OK, couldn't fit it and me ion the kitchen, but this is quite close:
    >http://my.opera.com/Velo-City/homes/albums/49101/fixed2.JPG



    Smooth. Low ratio though.
    >
    >Gotta agree with most of what Bob Downie said about riding fixed for
    >the first time, but he should have mentioned stopping: seriously weird
    >experiance, like being puched in the soles of your feet. I guess I'll
    >get used to it, but I'm glad I didn'f fit toe-clips or spuds yet, cuz
    >on a couple of hills it was a case ot just bottling it, and holding my
    >feet in the air as the pedals span.


    Don't delay fitting the spuds, it makes the whole thing a lot easier.

    >I think I'll fit a rear brake.



    Good move.


    Tim
     
  7. LSMike

    LSMike Guest

    Tim Hall wrote:
    > On 28 Mar 2006 00:14:29 -0800, "sothach" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    > >I think I'll fit a rear brake.

    >
    >
    > Good move.


    Quote from the page linked above: "Most fixed-gear riders only use a
    front brake--a rear brake is quite unnecessary on a fixed-gear
    machine."

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/fixed.html
     
  8. Simon D

    Simon D Guest

    LSMike expressed precisely :
    > Tim Hall wrote:
    >> On 28 Mar 2006 00:14:29 -0800, "sothach" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>> I think I'll fit a rear brake.

    >>
    >>
    >> Good move.

    >
    > Quote from the page linked above: "Most fixed-gear riders only use a
    > front brake--a rear brake is quite unnecessary on a fixed-gear
    > machine."
    >
    > http://www.sheldonbrown.com/fixed.html


    I think I'd add, "until your brake cable snaps as you're descending a
    steep hill."

    Some may think this unlikely, but it once very nearly happened to me.
    Luckily (incredibly, really) I just happened to need to brake hard at
    the top of the descent - where I'd have needed brakes for sure - and
    the cable snapped. I did actually continued to ride down the hill, but
    *very* carefully and *very* slowly, so that I was able to keep the bike
    under control.

    Having said that, I've not had a cable snap on me for about fifteen
    years, so the risk is pretty low, I suppose. The brake lever in
    question was an old Campag Super Record (so hardly low quality), and
    broke a number of (quality) cables. I imagine that there was some
    defect with it, but I could never spot it. Eventually I ditched it, as
    you can imagine!

    Anyway, I still use front and rear brakes on my old hack.

    --
    Simon
    www.simondaw.freeserve.co.uk
     
  9. sothach

    sothach Guest

    sothach wrote:
    > got a Suze cheapo hub

    Big mistake... I'd heard the cheapo Suzue Basic was made of cheese, but
    I thought, Cheddar or Appenzeller or something. Wrong, it was Brie.
    The sprocket was tighted on with a chain whip, and the lock ring with
    the correct park tools C-spanner, but I was able
    to strip the thread purely by pedalling forwards.

    So, what hub do I want to buy for the wheel re-build? Are Ambrosio any
    good (cuz they're black you see....)?
     
  10. Simon D

    Simon D Guest

    sothach submitted this idea :
    > sothach wrote:
    >> got a Suze cheapo hub

    > Big mistake... I'd heard the cheapo Suzue Basic was made of cheese, but
    > I thought, Cheddar or Appenzeller or something. Wrong, it was Brie.
    > The sprocket was tighted on with a chain whip, and the lock ring with
    > the correct park tools C-spanner, but I was able
    > to strip the thread purely by pedalling forwards.
    >
    > So, what hub do I want to buy for the wheel re-build? Are Ambrosio any
    > good (cuz they're black you see....)?


    ad luck.

    Are you sure that your hub was the problem, and not the sprocket,
    though? There are some awful fixed sprockets out there, and it wouldn't
    be great to buy a better hub and find that your sprocket strips that,
    too. Be particularly wary of Cyclo sprockets (I doubt they're still
    made - at least, I hope they're not - but there's not telling what
    might appear from the murky depths of a shop's drawers).

    Sorry, I'm very out of touch when it comes to product availability /
    quality. Ambrosio are usually a decent enough brand, though. I use a
    Dura-Ace hub on my old hack; although others here have commented on the
    lack of seals (they're a track hub, after all) I've found mine to be
    very weatherproof.

    --
    Simon
    www.simondaw.freeserve.co.uk
     
  11. sothach

    sothach Guest

    Simon D wrote:
    > ... Be particularly wary of Cyclo sprockets (I doubt they're still
    > made - at least, I hope they're not - but there's not telling what
    > might appear from the murky depths of a shop's drawers).


    Thanks for the heads-up - it looks like a cheap Cyclo sprocket, sort of
    pressed-out
    biscuit tin. I'm going to order up one of SJS's own-brand hubs, along
    with a Dura-ace sprocket & lock-ring. Pricey enough, so should be
    good...?
     
  12. Simon D

    Simon D Guest

    on 04/04/2006, sothach supposed :
    > Simon D wrote:
    >> ... Be particularly wary of Cyclo sprockets (I doubt they're still
    >> made - at least, I hope they're not - but there's not telling what
    >> might appear from the murky depths of a shop's drawers).

    >
    > Thanks for the heads-up - it looks like a cheap Cyclo sprocket, sort of
    > pressed-out
    > biscuit tin. I'm going to order up one of SJS's own-brand hubs, along
    > with a Dura-ace sprocket & lock-ring. Pricey enough, so should be
    > good...?


    I'm not familiar with the hub, but the Dura-Ace sprockets are (were?)
    excellent, and well worth the price.

    I used to be a trackie, and have known those useless Cyclo sprockets
    strip top quality hubs - they're really not a good buy!

    --
    Simon
    www.simondaw.freeserve.co.uk
     
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